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Full text of "Southern Missionary College Catalog 1972-73 (1973)"

SOUTHERN 

MISSIONARY 

COLLEGE 



72-1973 CATALOG 



5101 
„S367 
.A16 
1973 



COLiEGEDALE 
TENNESSEE 



Jkt QJou/i Sewfee . . . 

Inquiries by mail or telephone should be directed as follows: 

SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Collegedale, Tennessee 37315 
Telephone 615 396-2111 

ADMISSIONS and REGISTRATION— To the Director of Admissions 
and Records, Extension 312 



MATTERS OF GENERAL INTEREST— To the President, Extension 
222 



MATTERS OF RESIDENCE HALL LIVING— To the Dean of Stu- 
dents, Extension 232 
Women's Residence Hall 
Men's Residence Hall 



PUBLIC RELATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT— To the Director of 
Public Relations and Development, Extension 252 



SCHOLASTIC MATTERS— To the Academic Dean, Extension 212 



STUDENT FINANCE— To the Director of Student Finance, Extension 
322 



Although overnight accommodations are limited, parents and other 
friends of Southern Missionary College are cordially invited to visit the 
campus. The Public Relations Office will gladly arrange for you to see 
the college facilities and visit classes or other activities. Administrative 
offices are open from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, Sunday through Friday 
and 1:00-5:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday. 



BULLETIN OF 
SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

COLLESEDALE, TENNESSEE 37315 




Volume XXII 



"S.M.C." Second Quarter, 1972 



Published quarterly by Southern Missionary College, Collegedale, Tennessee. 
Entered as second class matter February 12, 1951, at Collegedale, Tennessee, under 
act of Congress August 24, 1912. 



Southern Missionary College 
1972-73 



SUMMER SESSION, 1972 

MAY 

31 Registration 

JUNE 

1 Classes Begin 

JULY 

5 Second Session Begins 

AUGUST 

10 Commencement 

FALL SEMESTER, 1972 

AUGUST 

27-28 Noon Faculty Colloquium 

27 Freshmen Arrive. Orientation 7:30 p.m. 

28 Freshman Orientation 

29 Freshman and Juniors Registration 

30 Sophomore and Seniors Registration 

31 Classes Begin 

SEPTEMBER 

9-11 MV Weekend 

OCTOBER 

21-28 Week of Religious Emphasis 

11 Field Day 

22,23 Alumni Homecoming 

28-30 College Bible Conference 

NOVEMBER 

22 Thanksgiving Vacation Begins (After classes or labs) 

26 Thanksgiving Vacation Ends (10:30 p.m.) 

DECEMBER 

22 Christmas Vacation Begins (After Exams) 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1973 

JANUARY 

8-9 Second Semester Registration 
10 Classes Begin 

FEBRUARY 

Week of Religious Emphasis 



MARCH 



7 Spring Vacation Begins (After classes or labs) 
13 Spring Vacation Ends (10:30 p.m.) 



APRIL 

15-16 College Days 

MAY 

6 Commencement 



SUMMER SESSION, 1973 

MAY 

30 Registration 

31 Classes Begin 

JULY 

5 Second Session Begins 

AUGUST 

9 Commencement 



in 



Contents 



At Your Service inside front cover 

Academic Calendar for 1972-1973 ii 

This Is Southern Missionary College — 1 

Student Life and Services 8 

Admission to SMC — .. 13 

Programs of Study — Degrees and Curricula _ 17 

Academic Information - - 23 

Departments and Courses of Instruction 31 

Pre-Professional Curricula 98 

Financial Information 103 

SMC Trustees 116 

Administration 117 

Superintendents of Auxiliary and Vocational Services 118 

Faculty Directory 119 

Faculty Committees 129 



IV 



THIS IS SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

I. DESCRIPTION 

Southern Missionary College is a private four-year multi-purpose 
coeducational college, owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church,* providing education in liberal arts, professional, and vocational 
curricula. Through a series of opportunities provided within and outside 
the classroom, Southern Missionary College seeks to encourage the acqui- 
sition of many additional values held by the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church. 

II. STATEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY 

Seventh-day Adventists recognize that God is not only the Creator 
and Sustainer of the earth and the entire universe, but also the source of 
knowledge and wisdom. Although many values common to classical and 
modern humanism are accepted at Southern Missionary College, it is held 
that these secular values are reflections of the mind of the Creator, the 
Author of all truth, transcending both space and time. 

In His image God created man perfect — sufficient to have stood, 
though free to fall. Because of sin, this man who bore a likeness to his 
Creator in his physical, mental, and spiritual nature has become sepa- 
rated from God, losing most of his similarity to his Maker. 

To restore in man the image of his Creator — to promote the devel- 
opment of body, mind, and soul that the divine purpose in his creation 
might be realized — is the object of Christian education, the great object 
of life. 

Believing man to be God's crowning act of creation, Seventh-day 
Adventists accept as reality the Biblical concept of man's body as the 
temple of God. Consequently, principles of health are emphasized that 
the student may more effectively carry out God's purpose, that he may 
respect the paramount work of the Creator, and that he may live the 
rewarding and abundant life promised in the Scriptures to those who 
do His will. 

Another aspect of having been created in the image of God is that 
every human being is endowed with a power akin to that of the Creator — 
individuality, the power to think and to do. It is the work of true educa- 
tion to develop this power, to train youth to be thinkers and not mere 
reflectors of other men's thoughts; it is the purpose of this college to send 
forth men and women who possess breadth of mind, clearness of thought, 
and courage of conviction. 

Seventh-day Adventists believe that knowledge of a personal God 
can never be derived by human reason alone, but that God has com- 



*The college is operated by the Southern Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists 
which is comprised of the churches in the states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Ken- 
tucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee, 



THIS IS SMC 

municated His nature, purposes, and plans through divine revelation. 
They further believe that the Bible — both Old and New Testaments — 
was given by inspiration of God, contains a revelation of His will to men, 
and constitutes the only unerring rule of faith and practice. The purpose 
of Christian education is to assist the students in knowing and doing, 
with Christ's help, the will of God more perfectly. Only through Christ 
can man be restored fully as he was created in the image of God. 

Our educational philosophy is, then, that true education means more 
than the pursual of a certain course of study or a preparation for the life 
that is now. It encompasses the whole being and the whole period of 
existence possible to man. It is the harmonious development of the 
physical, mental, social and spiritual powers, preparing the student for 
the joy of service in this world and in the world to come. 

III. STATEMENT OF OBJECTIVES 

A. It is the objective of Southern Missionary College to provide 
curricular and co-curricular activities to prepare creative and dedicated 
leaders to advance the program of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

B. It is the objective of Southern Missionary College to provide 
experiences which will enable the student to: 

Become a balanced individual through the harmonious development 
of his physical, social, mental, and spiritual faculties. 

Determine the basic purpose for his life. 

Determine his goals and values and to establish his priorities. 

Appreciate himself as a unique person while cultivating a sensitivity 
for the dignity and rights of others. 

Acquire a sense of individual responsibility and resourcefulness. 

Adopt principles of healthful living, including a balance in diet, 
physical exercise, adequate rest, and the abstinence from alcohol, 
tobacco, amphetamines, barbiturates, hallucinogens, narcotics, and 
other substances or practices harmful to his well being. 

Develop emotional maturity as well as physical health in an atmos- 
phere of Christian fellowship and security marked by acceptance, 
personal concern, and love. 

Prepare for contributions to mankind through employment in one 
or more of the various occupational pursuits. 

Learn the value of and receive satisfaction from service to others. 

Recognize and accept the principle that value in service be given in 
exchange for wages. 

Learn respect for the dignity of manual labor. 



THIS IS SMC 

Augment formal instruction with on-the-job training and actual 
supervised work experience in order to prepare for service in occu- 
pational fields as well as to provide means of financial support. 

Learn to work well with other people. 

Develop wholesome social relationships from the casual and tem- 
porary to the close and permanent. 

Gain respect for the democratic decision-making processes. 

Acquire knowledge and skills — through listening, reading, observ- 
ing, and discussing for effective participation in democratic pro- 
cesses — to participate constructively in civic and community 
activities. 

Understand and appreciate the world in which he lives through the 
acquisition of information pertaining to the common heritage in the 
arts and sciences. 

Develop intellectual curiosity, reflective thinking, and the desire to 
achieve his potential in the search for truth. 

Foster an appreciation for that which is elevating and beautiful — 
particularly God's handiwork in nature and the best in the fine arts. 

Gain an understanding of our natural environment, realize the 
dangers threatening this environment, and assist in its preservation. 
Develop and exercise creativity in thought and action. 

Gain a knowledge of, appreciation of, and opportunity for commit- 
ment to God's redemptive plan for man through Jesus Christ as 
taught from the Bible by Seventh-day Adventists. 

Understand and appreciate a Christian value system, allowing it to 
so permeate his life as to form the primary basis for decision making 
under any circumstances at any time. 

Participate actively as a responsible Christian citizen in the program 
of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

C. It is the objective of Southern Missionary College to provide 
cultural, informational, instructional, and religious resources and 
services for the community. 

HISTORY 

In 1892 the educational venture that developed into Southern 
Missionary College had its beginning in the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church in the small village of Graysville, Tennessee. The school 
became known as Graysville Academy. In 1896 the name was 
changed to Southern Industrial School and five years later to Southern 
Training School. 



THIS IS SMC 

In 1916, because of limited acreage available for further expan- 
sion of plant facilities, the school was moved to the Thatcher farm 
in Hamilton County, Tennessee. The name "Collegedale" was given 
to the anticipated community. At its new location the school opened 
as Southern Junior College and continued as such until 1944 when 
it achieved senior college status and the name was changed to South- 
ern Missionary College. Through the ensuing years the College has 
become known to its alumni and friends as SMC. 

SETTING 

SMC is unique in its location. The main campus is nestled in 
the pleasing Collegedale valley, surrounded by some seven hundred 
acres of school property. The quietness and beauty of its peaceful 
surroundings is in keeping with the educational philosophy of its 
governing organization. 

The community and campus post office address is Collegedale 
which is located eighteen miles east of Chattanooga and three miles 
from Ooltewah off Interstate Highway 75 (formerly U. S. 11 and 64). 
The Southern Railway line passes through the north side of the campus. 
A bus service operated by the Cherokee Lines serves the college campus. 

The Orlando campus situated in Florida's "City Beautiful" at the 
Florida Sanitarium and Hospital provides additional clinical facilities 
for the baccalaureate program of the Division of Nursing. The Madison 
campus at Madison, Tennessee, offers many of the clinical facilities used 
in the Associate in Science program in nursing and the Medical Record 
Technology program. 

ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS 

SMC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools and is approved oy the Tennessee State Board of Education 
for the preparation of secondary and elementary teachers. 

The curriculum of the Division of Nursing, including Public 
Health Nursing, is accredited by the National League of Nursing 
as surveyed by the Collegiate Board of Review. It is an agency 
member of the Department of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Pro- 
grams of the Division of Nursing Education of the National League for 
Nursing. It is also accredited t>y the Tennessee Board of Nursing, 
and recognized by the Florida State Board of Nursing. 

The College is a member of the Association of aeventh-day Ad- 
ventist Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Association of American 
Colleges, the American Council on Education, the Tennessee College 
Association, and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Edu- 
cation, the National Council of Accreditation for Teacher Education, 
and the National Association for Schools of Music. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

The academic program consists of twenty-one departments offering 
twenty-six majors and twenty-six minors in which students may 



THIS IS SMC 

qualify for the baccalaureate degree. Students may pursue programs 
of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science and Bach- 
elor of Music degrees. Various pre-professional and terminal curricula 
are available to students wishing to qualify for admission to profes- 
sional schools and to those wishing to take a two-year terminal pro- 
gram of a technical or vocational nature. 

THE FACULTY 

The faculty determines the quality of the academic program. A 
commitment to learning enables SMC teachers to keep abreast of new 
knowledge in their respective fields, and through research discover the 
pleasure of exploring those areas of knowledge yet unknown. 

The aim of the College is to achieve a closeness of teacher and 
student which will encourage the student to expand his interests and 
deepen his learning experiences by chatting informally with his instruc- 
tors in the offices or on the campus. The faculty consists of well-trained 
men and women devoted to teaching and academic advising in their 
areas of specialization. 

SMC STUDENTS 

Approximately sixty percent of the students of SMC come from 
the eight states comprising the Southern Union Conference of Seventh- 
day Adventists. However, many additional states and eight to ten 
overseas countries are also represented in the college community. Gen- 
erally the student group is fairly equally divided between men and 
women. 

It is significant to note that in recent years SMC freshmen stu- 
dents scored above the national average on the Scholastic College Ability 
Test. Even more noteworthy is the observation that over forty per 
cent of SMC graduates are sufficiently motivated to take graduate or 
professional training. In anticipation of advanced training, a number 
of graduates have qualified for scholarships and fellowships, including 
awards from the National Science Foundation, the National Defense 
Graduate Fellowship program, and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. 

Former SMC students are now serving in the ministerial, teach- 
ing, medical, and other services of the Seventh-day Adventist Church 
at home and abroad. Others are engaged in business pursuits, gov- 
ernment service, research activities, private and institutional medical 
services, and in the teaching professions on all levels. 

FACILITIES 

Wright Hall — Completed in the spring of 1967, this facility 
houses all the major administrative offices. Academic, business, and 
student personnel offices are located in the two story colonial structure. 
The third floor will be completed at a later date as part of the second 
phase of the building program. 



THIS IS SMC 

Lynn Wood Hall — The instructional building, named in honor 
of Dr. Lynn Wood, president of the College from 1918-1922, is a 
three-story structure housing teachers' offices and classroom facilities. 

Hackman Hall — Earl F. Hackman Hall, modern in arrangement 
and appointment, a commodious, two-story, fireproof building, con- 
tains various well-equipped lecture rooms and laboratories of the 
Chemistry and the Biology Departments. The first phase of this building 
was completed in 1951. An addition, comparable in size to the first unit, 
was completed in 1961. 

Miller Hall— The Harold A. Miller Hall, completed in 1953, 
houses the music department. This two-story, fireproof building pro- 
vides studios, practice rooms, and an auditorium equipped with a 
Baldwin grand piano and a Schantz pipe organ installed in 1962. The 
building was named in honor of Harold A. Miller, who for many 
years headed the Music Department. 

Thatcher Hall — Recently completed, Thatcher Hall provides fa- 
cilities for 510 women. This three-story building is carpeted and air 
conditioned throughout with a bath between each two student rooms. 

Talge Hall — Formerly the women's residence hall, this building 
has been converted to accommodate approximately 400 men. This mod- 
ern, fireproof structure was completed in 1961 to house 275 students. 
In 1964 a new wing was completed to house an additional 125 students. 
The spacious and beautiful chapel with adjoining prayer rooms, the 
parlors, the kitchenette, and the infirmary facilities are but a few of the 
attractive features which provide for enjoyable and comfortable living. 

McKee Library — Completed in 1970, the McKee Library embodies 
the spirit of culture and learning. It is built to accommodate 300,000 
volumes and will seat more than 600 students, most of them in individual 
carrels. 

Daniells Hall — Formerly the college library, Daniells Hall was 
renovated in 1970 to accommodate the departments of Physics, Mathe- 
matics and Computer Science. 

College Auditorium — This building serves as a temporary cafeteria. 
It also houses the orchestra and band equipment. 

Spalding Elementary School — This modern one-story elementary 
school is named for Arthur W. Spalding. The eleven classrooms, audito- 
rium, and recreation room serve as a vital part of the teacher-training 
program and in the education of the boys and girls residing in Collegedale. 

Home Arts Center — This modern two-story structure was completed 
in the fall of 1971. The complex houses the entire Home Economics 
facility and includes a foods lab, sewing lab, crafts lab, interior design 
classroom, child development observation room, other classrooms, and 
an auditorium seating 126. 

Ledford Hall — This modern, well-equipped Industrial Arts facility 



THIS IS SMC 

completed in the summer of 1964, was a gift of the McKee Baking Co. 
The one-story brick structure contains teacher offices, a classroom, and 
auto mechanics, welding, drafting, machine shop and printing labs. 

Physical Education Building — This new facility, made possible by 
the Committee of 100 for the development of Southern Missionary 
College, incorporates the latest advancements in design and equipment. 
It contains a large gymnasium with three basketball courts, a classroom, 
teacher offices, shower facilities, and a fully enclosed Olympic size 
swimming pool. The pool was contributed by the students who raised 
$30,000 in a special campaign to finance the project. 

Collegedale Church — The new Collegedale church, completed in the 
fall of 1965, is the spiritual home of the students and faculty of Southern 
Missionary College and the residents of the local community. Of modern 
architecture, the church seats approximately 1,800 in the main sanc- 
tuary, in addition to Sabbath School rooms and offices for the pastor and 
assistant pastor. 

Collegedale Academy — This building contains all the facilities for 
operating the day program of the secondary laboratory school. The 
academy serves commuting students from Hamilton and Bradley 
counties. 

College Plaza — The beautiful College Plaza shopping center com- 
pleted in the spring of 1963 contains the Village Market, South- 
ern Mercantile, Collegedale Distributors, Campus Kitchen, Georgia- 
Cumberland Conference Branch Book and Bible House, Washateria, 
Barber Shop, Beauty Parlor, Collegedale Credit Union, Collegedale 
Insurance, U.S. Post Office, a modern service station, and a bank. 

Auxiliary and Vocational Buildings — The auxiliary and voca- 
tional buildings include the College Press, Laundry, Cabinet Shop, 
Broom Shop, Bakery, Bindery, Collegedale Interiors, and Central Plant. 

StufLent Apartments — The college maintains a number of housing 
units as well as a trailer park for married students. Additional facilities 
are available in the community. 



STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 

A college is not only classroom instruction but also a mode of asso- 
ciation. The effectiveness of the college program is enhanced if stu- 
dents choose to develop their particular interests and to meet then- 
needs through significant participation in the non-academic activities 
provided. Advisers are available to give counsel and direction in plan- 
ning the total college program. Students are encouraged to take ad- 
vantage of the facilities and opportunities planned for their cultural, 
social, and spiritual growth. 

RESIDENCE HALL LIVING 

Living in a college residence hall with its daily and inevitable 
"give and take" prepares the student to meet the vicissitudes of life 
with equanimity, teaches respect for the rights and opinions of others, 
and affords a first hand experience in adjusting to a social group. 

To assure students this beneficial experience, the College requires 
those unmarried and not living with their parents in the vicinity to 
reside in one of the residence halls. 

DINING 

For the promotion of student health and simultaneous cultural 
development, SMC provides a complete cafeteria service, organized to 
serve the student's schedule with utmost consideration. Service by the 
cafeteria staff is available for the many student and faculty social func- 
tions of the school year. 

The modern decor of the spacious dining hall makes it an inviting 
center of the social and cultural life of the College. An auxiliary dining 
room is available for meetings of various student or faculty organizations. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The Health Service is administered by the Director of Health 
Service in cooperation with the College Physician. Regular office hours 
are maintained by the service director. The College Physician is on call 
at the Clinic which is located on the campus. 

The room rental charge for residence hall students covers the 
cost of routine services and non-prescription medications, and infirmary 
care, as provided under the College group plan. In case of major illness, 
students may be referred to off-campus hospital facilities. Students when 
accepted will be supplied with a brochure in which complete information 
is given concerning the benefits of the health and accident insurance 
group plan. The College is not responsible for injuries sustained on or off 
the campus, but is prepared to render first aid assistance as needed. 

It is required that all new students submit to a medical examina- 
tion before coming to SMC. The medical examination form sent out 
with the acceptance letter must be used by the examining physician 
and returned to the College. 

8 



STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICE 

During registration each student is assigned a curriculum adviser 
to assist in program planning. Throughout the school year the curricu- 
lum adviser will be available for advice and guidance on academic 
questions. 

Although curriculum advisers may be consulted on questions 
and problems other than academic ones, students are invited to seek 
counsel from any member of the faculty. Personal problems will be 
given thoughtful consideration. , Members of the faculty deem it a privi- 
lege to discuss with the student great principles, concepts, and ideas in 
an atmosphere of informality and friendliness. Students are urged 
to become personally acquainted with as many members of the fac- 
ulty as possible. 

Students with personal problems who wish assistance from a pro- 
fessional counselor should consult the Dean of Students or Director of 
Counseling Services. Personnel trained in psychology and counseling are 
available to those with serious social and personal problems. 

The testing service works in close cooperation with the counsel- 
ing service in providing guidance information to both students and 
counselors. Students are urged to take advantage of the testing serv- 
ice as a means of obtaining information useful in choosing a profession 
or occupation. 

ORIENTATION PROGRAM 

SMC has a personal interest in the success of the student de- 
siring a college education. There is much that the student must do 
for himself in getting acquainted with the academic, social, and re- 
ligious life of the College by perusing this bulletin and the SMC Student 
Handbook. Instruction and counsel is given which will help the student 
better understand the college program and what is expected of him as a 
citizen of the college community. 

Orientation for new students is held prior to the opening week of 
the fall term. It includes examinations and instruction helpful in 
course planning. The student is introduced to the facilities, purposes, 
and functions of the college. Social occasions are also provided when 
students may meet faculty* members and fellow students. All new 
and transfer students are required to attend the orientation program. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

The College operates a variety of auxiliary and vocational serv- 
ices and enterprises where students may obtain part-time employment 
to defray a portion of their school expenses. Opportunities to engage 
in productive and useful labor can help to develop character traits of 
industry, dependability, initiative and thrift. Students may also take 
advantage of these employment opportunities to acquire vocational 
skills by contacting The Director of Student Finance. 



STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 

Students who accept employment assignments are expected to meet 
all work appointments with punctuality. To be absent from work ap- 
pointments without cause or previous arrangement, or notification of ill- 
ness is sufficient reason for disciplinary action or discharge. Students 
accepting employment by the College are required to maintain their work 
schedule during the entire semester including examination week. 

Residence hall students may not secure off-campus employment 
without permission of the Dean of Students. 

SENIOR PLACEMENT SERVICE 

One of the personnel services of the College is that of assisting 
graduates in securing appointments for service. The Placement Serv- 
ice distributes information concerning each senior student to a wide 
list of prospective employers. The Dean of Students serves as the liaison 
officer in bringing graduate and employer together. 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

Every student at SMC who is taking 8 or more semester hours 
of classwork is a member of the Student Association, with voting 
privileges in the election of officers. Opportunities for leadership 
development and for cooperation in achieving the objectives of SMC are 
afforded by the Association. The Association assists the College ad- 
ministration and faculty in the implementation of policies and assumes 
responsibility in giving direction to campus activities entrusted to it. 

The Association's activities are coordinated and communicated 
through the Student Senate and Cabinet and their several committees. 
The activities include the publishing of the weekly newspaper, Southern 
Accent; the yearbook, Southern Memories; the announcement sheet, 
Campus Accent; and the student-faculty directory. 

The activities and responsibilities of officers and the detailed or- 
ganization of the Student Association are outlined in the Student Asso- 
ciation Constitution and By-laws. 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Aside from the Student Association and its committees, more 
than thirty campus organizations provide opportunity for leadership 
training. They may be classified under four divisions: church-relatecl 
organizations, social clubs, professional clubs, and special interest or 
hooby clubs. 

The church-related organizations are the Missionary Volunteer 
Society, Ministerial Seminar, American Temperance Society, and the 
Colporteur Club. 

The professional clubs are organized by the instructional de- 
partments of the College under the sponsorship of department heads. 

10 



STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 

The social clubs are organized according to place of residence. 
These are the Married Couples' Forum; Upsilon Delta Phi, the men's 
club; and Sigma Theta Chi, the women's club. 

CONCERT-LECTURE SERIES 

Each year students have the privilege of attending a concert-lecture 
series featuring distinguished artists, lecturers, and film travelogues. 
These programs are generally scheduled for Saturday or Sunday nights. 
The cost of season tickets issued to students at the beginning of each year 
is included in the tuition. 

FINE ARTS SERIES 

To cultivate an appreciation for that which is elevating and beau- 
tiful in the fine arts, evening concerts by visiting musicians are 
sponsored by the Fine Arts Department. (Season tickets are provided 
without charge to all students.) Art exhibits by prominent artists are 
displayed in the McKee Library and are opened to the public. 

STANDARD OF CONDUCT 

In harmony with the objectives of the College, high standards 
of behavior are maintained to encourage the development of genuine 
Christian character. Mature Christian students of sound spiritual and 
social integrity delight in standards that elevate and ennoble. Admis- 
sion to SMC is a privilege that requires the acceptance of and com- 
pliance with published and announced regulations. Only those whose 
principles and interests are in harmony with the ideals of the College 
and who willingly subscribe to the social program as ordered are 
welcomed. 

A student who finds himself out of harmony with the social 
policies of the College, who is uncooperative, and whose attitudes give 
evidence of an unresponsive nature may be advised to withdraw 
without specific charge. The use of tobacco or alcoholic beverages, 
theatre attendance, card playing, dancing, profane or vulgar language, 
hazing, and improper associations are not tolerated. 

Each student is expected to acquaint himself with the standard 
of conduct published in the SMC Student Handbook. A copy may be 
obtained from the Dean of Student Affairs. Interim announcements of 
policies adopted by the faculty are of equal force with those listed in 
official publications. 

CHAPEL AND WORSHIP SERVICES 

In private parochial education it has been well known that elimina- 
tion of residence halls convocation and all school convocations is the first 
step toward the separation of the school from its sponsoring church. Con- 
vocation exercises in the residence halls and for the combination student 



11 



STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 

body serve educational and religious purposes. They also provide an ele- 
ment of unity which is one of the most desirable features of private 
education such as found at Southern Missionary College. 

The religious emphasis weeks and the weekend church services assist 
the spiritual growth of the students comprising the college community. 
Students are expected to attend these services regularly. Failure to do so 
will jeopardize the student's current status and readmission privileges. 

MARRIAGES 

Student marriages are not permitted while a school semester or 
session is in progress. 



12 



ADMISSION TO SMC 

SMC welcomes applications from young people regardless of race, 
color, or national origin whose principles and interests are in harmony 
with the ideals and traditions of the college as expressed in its objectives 
and policies. To qualify, applicants must give evidence of Christian 
character, intelligence, health, and a will to pursue the program out- 
lined in this bulletin and the SMC Student Handbook. Although 
religious affiliation is not a requirement for admission, all students are ex- 
pected to live by the policies and standards of the college as a church- 
related institution. Only those who by their conduct and attitudes respect 
the total program may have the privilege of student citizenship on the 
SMC campus. 

PREPARATION FOR FRESHMAN STANDING 

Applicants for admission as freshmen must submit evidence accord- 
ing to one of the following patterns: 

A. Regular students: 

1. Graduation from an approved secondary school with at least 
2.00 GPA on major subjects, and a minimum of 15 standard 
score in English and composite on ACT. 

B. Students without graduation from secondary school: 

1. At least 18 units, including 12 Carnegie units. 

2. At least 3.00 GPA. 

3. A minimum of 20 standard score in English and composite 
on ACT. 

4. Must have recommendation of secondary school staff. 

5. Must be socially mature. 

C. Students over 21 but without secondary school diploma: 

1. G.E.D. with an average standard score of 50 and no single 
test less than 45. Must have at least 8 units of secondary 
school work. 

D. Students under 21 who transfer from a college which accepted 
them on a G.E.D.: 

1. The student must have at least 15 semester hours of accept- 
able grades at the other university. 
Applicants not meeting the requirements for regular admission 
will be given individual consideration. 

While the College does not recommend specific subjects for admis- 
sion, the following minimum preparation, with quality performance 
in evidence, is required: 

^ Four units of English, excluding courses in Journalism and 
Speech. 

13 



ADMISSION TO SMC 

► Two or more units of mathematics including algebra — algebra 
and geometry preferred. For those wishing to pursue any cur- 
riculum in science or science-related fields, the second unit must 
be either algebra II or geometry. 

► Two units of science — laboratory experience required in at 
least one unit. Students planning to enter the Associate in 
Science Program in Nursing must have taken high school 
chemistry. Students planning to take any paramedical or science 
curriculum must include either physics or chemistry. 

► Two units of social studies. 

Two units of one foreign language, and a course in typing are 
strongly recommended. Students admitted with less than three units of 
religion and two units of one foreign language will be required to com- 
plete additional courses in these areas oeyond the general education 
requirements for the baccalaureate degrees. An exception to the policy 
involving foreign language study may be noted in certain curricula 
leading to the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Music degrees. 

Other deficiencies revealed by transcript and entrance exam- 
inations will be given individual attention. Make-up work involving 
remedial non-credit courses and college level courses intended to 
satisfy secondary unit deficiencies may be assigned as part of the 
academic program during the freshman year. 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students wishing to transfer to SMC from another accredited college 
or university must follow the same application procedure as other stu- 
dents. Transfer credits may be applied toward the requirements for 
a degree when the student has satisfactorily completed a mini- 
mum of twelve semester hours in residence. A maximum of seventy- 
two semester hours may be accepted from a junior college. Background 
deficiencies revealed by transcripts and entrance examinations will be 
given individual attention. Students transferring from non-accredited 
institutions of higher education are given conditional status until the level 
of their academic performance in residence warrants promotion to regu- 
lar status. Grades of less than "C" from such institutions will not be 
accepted toward meeting graduation requirements. A student who has 
been dismissed from another institution because of poor scholarship or 
citizenship, or who is on probation from that institution, is not generally 
eligible for admission until he can qualify for readmission to the institu- 
tion from which he has been dismissed. 

TRANSFER FROM PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AND DIPLOMA SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Students transferring from professional schools and diploma schools 
of nursing may receive up to 60 hours of college credit or waiver by 
validation examinations covering previous courses equivalent to certain 
requirements including electives as approved by the Academic Dean 

14 



ADMISSION TO SMC 

in counsel with the departmental chairman. A student must achieve 
at least a "C" on a validation examination. Validation tests may not be 
repeated. The following rules of procedure apply: 

1. Application in writing to the departmental chairman of the 
major field. 

2. Payment to the accounting office in advance of a special examin- 
ation fee of $25 for each separate validation examination for 
credit, or $5 for a validation examination for waiver. If a 
student registers to audit a course satisfactorily taken previously 
to prepare for a validation test, no special validation fee will be 
charged if the test is the usual end of course examination. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Students who are 21 years of age or older and who are unable 
to provide evidence of having completed the requirements for sec- 
ondary school graduation are encouraged to seek admission if personal 
qualifications for success in college are in evidence. The results of 
college entrance examinations as advised by the College and the edu- 
cational background of the applicant will be considered necessary 
criteria for admission. 

ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature individuals who do not meet the above college admission 
requirements and who do not wish to become degree candidates, or 
otherwise-qualified students who may desire limited credit for trans- 
fer to another institution of higher learning, may register as special 

students. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

^ Request application forms from the Office of Admissions and 
Records. 

^ Return the completed application budget sheet and medical form 
to the Office of Admissions and Records with the application fee 
of $5. This fee is $5 if the application is received at least six 
weeks before the beginning of the semester. After that the fee 
will be $10. 

^ It is the student's responsibility to request his former school to 
forward his transcript to the Office of Admissions in support of 
his application. This will become the property of the college. NO 
TRANSCRIPT WILL BE ACCEPTED DIRECTLY FROM AN 
APPLICANT. 

^ To permit a more effective program of counseling for admis- 
sion, applicants must submit scores from the American College 
Testing Program (ACT). Test scores are valuable in deter- 

15 



ADMISSION TO SMC 

mining ability to pursue a college program, and in discovering 
areas in which the student may be deficient. 

^ Upon receipt of the application, transcripts of credits, recom- 
mendations and test scores, the Admissions Committee will 
notify the applicant of the action taken. 

WHEN TO APPLY OR REAPPLY 

New students are urged to submit applications not later than the 
last term of the senior year of high school. Applications submitted 
at the beginning of the senior year will sometimes enable the College 
to suggest ways of strengthening the student's preparation. Because 
of the difficulty sometimes encountered during the summer months 
in obtaining necessary transcripts, test scores, and recommendations, 
more time will be necessary for processing late applications. 

Students in residence may submit re-applications without charge 
until April 30. Thereafter the regular application fee of $5 will be 
required until July 31, after which the fee becomes $10. 



16 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 
DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

As a Christian liberal arts college, SMC intends that God be 
placed at the center of all learning experience. Through classroom 
instruction, the spiritual emphasis on college life, and the organized social 
program for the student, an effort is made to assist students in arriving 
at a realistic and a satisfying perspective of the universe. 

A Christian liberal education at SMC is primarily concerned with 
character and intelligence, neither of which it can create. It attempts to 
provide the atmosphere and conditions under which both can be discov- 
ered and nurturea to maturity. In essence, it seeks to: 

^ Engender a considered sense of judgment and values involving 
commitments to moral positions based on Christian philosophy, 
religion and experience. 

^ Liberate the individual human mind as essential to the dis- 
covery and acquisition of truth. 

^ Reveal that education is both discipline and delight, and that 
meaningful, lasting benefits flow from men and women who 
have become involved in the pleasures of learning. 

^ Provide knowledge of classified facts pertaining to man's re- 
lationship to his physical and social universe. 

► Develop basic abilities and skills that are widely transferable 
and needed in nearly all of man's pursuits. To understand 
people, to be able to organize and communicate effectively, and 
to possess a will to follow through with the assigned task at 
hand are all essential tools for successful living. 

PLANNING A COURSE OF STUDY 

When planning for college, the student should consider in detail 
the course of study desired as a preparation for a specific profession 
or occupation. It is not always necessary to have made firm decisions 
about the choice of one's life work before entering college. Some students 
prefer to take a general program of education during the freshman 
year while exploring several fields of knowledge. This approach need 
not result in loss of credits if carefully planned. 

Students planning to teach should consult the Department of Educa- 
tion so as to include courses in teacher education as a part of their pro- 
gram of study in order to qualify for denominational and state 
certification. 

The programs of study and the over-all graduation requirements 
outlined in this bulletin should be seriously considered by students 
in advance of registration. After careful study of the desired program 
the student should then consult his faculty adviser. If convenient, fresh- 
man students may wish to consult faculty advisers during the summer 
months prior to the beginning of the fall term. 

The College offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music Degrees. Although 
SMC is essentially a liberal arts college, pre-professional and terminal 
curricula are offered for students planning to enter professional schools 

17 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

and for those who, because of limited resources and qualifications, may 
wish to pursue a two-year terminal program of a technical nature. 
These curricula are described following the degree programs. 

GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The general degree requirements for a baccalaureate degree are: 

^ Satisfactory make-up of deficiencies revealed by high school 
transcript and entrance examinations. 

^ A minimum of 128 semester hours including 40 hours of upper 
biennium credits, with a resident and cumulative grade point 
average of 2.00 (C) or above. 

^ Completion of a major and minor (two majors accepted), with a 
cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the majors, the general 
education requirements, and electives to satisfy the total credit 
requirements for graduation. Courses completed with grades 
lower than a "C" may not be applied on a major or minor. No 
course may fulfill both major and minor requirements of the 
same student. 

^ Thirty semester hours of credit must be completed in residence 
immediately preceding conferment of the degree. Sixteen of the 
thirty hours must be in the upper biennium with at least eight 
hours in the major and three in the minor. 

^ Completion of the Undergraduate Record Examinations Area, 
Field and Aptitude tests. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The well-educated individual must possess an understanding of 
the broad outlines of human knowledge as well as of his chosen field of 
specialization. It is the purpose of general education to provide the 
student with a capability for critical thinking and a knowledge of his 
cultural heritage. Thus all degree candidates are required to select 
certain general education courses as a part of the total educational 
program. It is expected that every student will take courses in Religion 
anaEnglish during the freshman year. While it is not expected that stu- 
dents complete all the general education requirements during the fresh- 
man and sophomore years, a total of 45 hours with a grade point average 
of at least 2.00 must be completed before registering for upper biennium 
courses, with six hours in each of the following areas: college composi- 
tion, science and mathematics, social science, religion, and two hours of 
physical education. All bachelor of science programs have the same 
general education requirements as the bachelor of arts program with 
the exception of the modern language. If a department requires inter- 
mediate language for a bachelor of science degree, this six-hour require- 
ment may be substituted for three hours in social science and three hours 
in language arts excluding Freshman English. 

Nursing students will take two hours of physical activity courses 

18 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

and the remaining two hours of physical education will be waived 
because of the health related type of program they are pursuing. They 
must have the 128 hour total for graduation. 

General Education Requirements for the B.A. Degree 
Applied and Fine Arts (Both to be represented) .... 5 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 4 hours 

Humanities 4 hours 

Language Arts 11 hours 

Religion 12 hours 

Science and Mathematics 12 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

APPLIED AND FINE ARTS. Rve hours 

Both applied and fine arts must be represented in any combination 
the student desires. All classes in the Art and Music Departments for 
which students are eligible to register will fulfill the fine arts portion 
of this requirement. 

The applied arts portion of this requirement may be satisfied by 
selecting courses from Accounting; Chemistry 144; Communications 
16 and 62; Computer Science; Home Economics, with the exclusion of 
courses 2, 19, 61, 119, 131, 132, 161, 162, 191; Industrial Education; Li- 
brary Science; Office Administration, with the exclusion of courses 72, 
73, 141, 146, 174, and 181. No credit will be allowed for Typing 13 
if one year of typing has been completed in high school. No credit will 
be allowed for Typing 14 if two years of credit have been obtained in 
high school. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE. Six hours 

To broaden the student's knowledge of other peoples and cultures, 
courses in foreign language are required. Since a degree of compe- 
tence in one language is expected, the student must complete one of 
the following courses: 

a. Spanish 93:94 c. French 93:94 

b. German 93:94 d. Greek 101:102 

Students entering college with inadequate preparation as determined 
by a standardized proficiency test for one of the above courses must first 
complete an elementary course in the chosen foreign language. No credit 
will be granted for elementary modern language if credit has already 
been received for it at the secondary level. 

Any student whose native tongue is not English must meet the 
six-hour requirement by taking additional studies in English, speech and 
courses dealing with American culture. 

19 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION. Four hours 

Two hours of Activity Courses and P. E. 53, Health and Life, 
two hours. 

HUMANITIES. Four hours 

To provide for a better understanding and appreciation of the 
creative arts, a special humanities course of four hours is required of 
all students following their freshman year. This course is a study of 
art, music, and literature in historical perspective. 

LANGUAGE ARTS. Eleven hours 

To prepare the student more fully in the effective and accurate 
use of spoken and written English and to acquaint him with 
the beauty of selected literary masterpieces, the following courses in the 
Language Arts are required: 

a. English 1:2 6 hours 

b. literature 3 hours 

c. Speech 2 hours 

RELIGION. Twelve hours 

Each student must take a minimum of 3 hours of Bible and Religion 
courses during each year in residence up to 12 hours. Transfer students 
from other than Seventh-day Adventist colleges will take three hours for 
each year in residence with a minimum of 6 hours for graduation. To 
become acquainted with the Biblical perspective of life and destiny the 
student is required to take at least two of trie following three courses: 

a. Religion 10; 50; 105 6-9 hours 

b. Additional course (s) to be selected from the 

categories of Bible or Religion or Physics 126 .... 3-6 hours 

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS. Twelve hours 

An understanding of the scientific method and the universe in 
which he lives is vitally important to the well-educated individual. This 
requirement must be met by selecting courses from at least two of the 
areas of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics. A minimum of 
six hours must include courses with a laboratory. Additional hours may 
be selected from appropriate courses in Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, 
Physics, and Basic Electronics. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE, Twelve hours 

To acquaint him with the social and cultural aspects of 
man and his environment, the heritage of western civilization and 
current social concepts, the student is required to take the following 
courses: 

a. History 1, 2 or 53, 54 6 hours 

20 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

b. Additional courses selected from economics, 
geography, history, political science, psychol- 
ogy, sociology or anthropology 6 hours 

Students who have not taken World History at the secondary level 
must include History 1, 2. 

THE BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Twelve majors for the Bachelor of Arts degree are offered: 

Art History 

Biology Mathematics 

Chemistry Music 

Communications Physics 

English Religion 

German Spanish 

THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Thirteen majors for the Bachelor of Science degree are offered. For 
general education requirements in variance with those previously out- 
lined for the Bachelor of Arts degree, the student should consult the 
specific department of interest as listed in the section "Departments 
and Courses of Instruction." 

The majors are: 

Accounting Foods and Nutrition Medical Technology 

Behavioral Sciences Health, Phys. Ed. and Nursing 

Business Admin. Recreation Office Admin. 

Chemistry Home Economics Physics 

Elementary Education Industrial Arts 

THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

The Bachelor of Music degree is available to students planning 
to major in music with special emphasis in music education. The de- 
tailed requirements for this professional degree are outlined under the 
Department of Music in the section "Departments and Courses of In- 
struction." 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

The College offers twenty-six majors and twenty-six minors for 
students wishing to qualify for a baccalaureate degree. Minors are 
offered in Broadcasting, Computer Science, Economics, French, Journal- 
ism, Psychology, and Speech, as well as in most major fields of study 
listed under the degree programs. Each major for a baccalaureate degree 
consists of thirty hours or more in the chosen field of specialization of 
which a minimum of fourteen must be upper biennium credit. The 
total of semester hours required for each major for the Bachelor of 

21 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Science and Bachelor of Music degrees varies with the field of speciali- 
zation chosen. 

All minors consist of eighteen semester hours. Six hours of a 
minor must be upper biennium credit. 

The specific requirements for majors and minors are given under 
the respective departments in the section "Departments and Courses 
of Instruction." No class may fulfill both major and minor requirements. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

SMC offers pre-professional and pre-technical programs in a wide 
variety of fields which may prepare students for admission to pro- 
fessional schools or to enter upon technical careers. Below are listed 
the pre-professional curricula most frequently chosen by students. 

Dentistry Medicine Physical Therapy 

Dental Hygiene Occupational Therapy Veterinary Medicine 

Law Optometry X-Ray Technology 

Medical Record Osteopathy 
Librarian 

Pre-professional and technical admission requirements may vary 
from one professional school to another. The student is, therefore, 
advised to become acquainted with the admission requirements of 
the chosen school. 

Detailed requirements for the pre-professional curricula are out- 
lined in the section on "Pre-Professional Curricula." 

TERMINAL CURRICULA 

In addition to the degree programs and pre-professional cur- 
ricula, the College offers four terminal curricula intended to meet the 
needs of students with limited resources and qualifications who wish 
to experience the benefits of one or two years on a college campus. 
The following terminal curricula qualify the student for an Associate in 
Arts or an Associate in Science diploma. 

Industrial Education Nursing 

Medical Office Administration Office Administration 

Complete details of course requirements for the terminal cur- 
ricula are outlined in the departmental descriptions in the bulletin 
section "Departments and Courses of Instruction." 



22 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

REGISTRATION 

Students are expected to register during the scheduled registra- 
tion periods designated in the school calendar. The registration pro- 
cess is complete only after all procedures have been met and regis- 
tration forms are returned to the Office of Records. Freshmen and 
transfer students are required to participate in the Orientation Week 
activities. 

Late Registration. Permission to register late must be obtained 
from the Academic Dean. Students failing to register during the 
scheduled registration periods will be assessed a late registration fee 
of $10.00 and $2.00 for each additional day. The course load of a late 
registrant will be reduced by one to two semester hours of each expired 
week of instruction. No student should expect to register after two 
weeks of the semester have elapsed. 

Changes in Registration. To avoid changes in registration the 
student should carefully consider the program of courses necessary 
to meet his objectives. To avoid subsequent adjustments, a balance 
must be maintained between the course load, work program, and 
extra-curricular activities. 

If expedient, changes in the student's program may be made 
during the first week of instruction by the Director of Records 
with the approval of the course instructor. Subsequent changes must 
also have the approval of the Academic Dean. To effect a change in 
courses, the student must obtain the appropriate change of registration 
voucher at the Office of Records. After having the proposed change 
of program approved, the student must return the form to the Office 
of Records. Course changes and complete withdrawals from the school 
become effective on the date the voucher is filed at the Office of Rec- 
ords. A fee of $5.00 will be assessed for each change in the course 
program following the first week of instruction. 

A student may not change from one course section to another 
without the approval of the instructor and the Director of Records. 

A student may withdraw from a class up to three weeks after the 
end of the mid-term and receive a grade of "W" automatically. A student 
withdrawing from a class after that up to the last class before final 
examinations will be assigned a grade of "WP" or "WF" by the teacher. 

Auditing Courses. A student may register on an audit basis with the 
approval of the department in courses for which he is qualified. Class at- 
tendance is expected but examinations and reports may be omitted. With 
the approval of the instructor a student may change a course registration 
for audit to credit, or for credit to audit, during the first week of instruc- 
tion only. No credit is given for courses audited, and the fee is the 
regular tuition charge. 

23 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

COURSE LOAD 

The measure of a college course is expressed in semester hours. A 
semester hour usually consists of one fifty-minute class period per 
week for one semester. Thus, two semester hour classes are scheduled 
to convene twice a week and three semester hour classes three times a 
week. A laboratory period of two or three hours is equal to one class 
period. Exceptions may be made only by action of the Academic Policies 
Committee. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in four years, a student 
must take an average load of sixteen hours per semester. The sum- 
mer term may be used to advantage by students wishing to com- 
plete degree requirements in less than four years or by students hav- 
ing to take reduced programs of studies during the regular academic year. 

Except by permission of the Academic Dean, a resident student 
may not register for more than sixteen or less than eight semester 
hours. By permission, students of superior scholastic ability may regis- 
ter for a maximum of eighteen hours. Freshmen may not exceed sev- 
enteen hours. A student is expected to pursue a program of studies equal 
to his ability. 

Study-Work Program. It is exceedingly important that the stu- 
dent adjust the course load to achieve a reasonable balance in study 
and work. During registration the student should confer with his 
adviser or major professor in planning the proper balance of study 
and work. In determining an acceptable study-work program, the 
student's intellectual capacity and previous scholastic record are con- 
sidered. Exceptions to the following schedule of study and work 
must receive tne approval of the Academic Dean. 

Maximum 
Course Load Work Load 

16 hours 16 hours 

14 hours 20 hours 

12 hours 26 hours 

10 hours 32 hours 

8 hours 38 hours 

Students of average scholastic ability are advised to plan a study- 
work program involving less than the maximum hours of labor 
permitted. Freshmen in particular need more time for orientation 
and adjustment to the college academic program. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Mid-semester and semester grade reports are issued to the stu- 
dent and his parent or guardian. Only semester grades are recorded 

24 



A 


Superior 


B 


Above average 


C 


Average 


D 


Below average 


F 


Failure 


S 


Satisfactory 


I 


Incomplete 


w 


Withdrawal 


WP 


Withdrew passing 
Withdrew failing 


WF 


AU 


Audit 


NC 


Non-credit 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

on the student's permanent record at the College. The following 
system of grading and grade point values is used: 

4 grade points per hour 
3 grade points per hour 
2 grade points per hour 
1 grade points per hour 
grade points per hour 



grade points per hour 



The grade "S" may be given in group organizations and prob- 
lem courses but may not be used as a final grade. A student may 
receive an "Incomplete" because of illness or other unavoidable delay. 
An incomplete grade must be removed by the end of the first six weeks 
of the following semester. A student who believes he is eligible for an 
incomplete must secure from the Office of Admissions and Records the 
proper form on which he may file application with the Academic Dean 
to receive an incomplete. 

A course in which the student received a grade of "D" or "F" 
may be repeated before he takes a more advanced course in the same 
field. 

The grade point average may be calculated by dividing the total 
number of grade points earned by the course loaa. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

When for any reason a student's scholarship falls below a "C" (2.00) 
average, he may be required to adjust his program. 

A student is automatically placed on academic probation or aca- 
demically dismissed when his cumulative grade point average fails to 
reach the following accumulated levels: 



Semester Hours 


G.P.A. 


G.P.A. 


Attempted 


Dismissal Level 


Probation Level 


1-23 




1.60 


24-48 


1.50 


1.75 


49-64 


1.65 


1.90 


65-80 


1.75 


2.00 


81-95 


1.85 


2.00 


95-up 


1.95 


2.00 



Beginning freshmen will be allowed to attempt 23 semester hours 
over a period of two semesters before being subject to dismissal. Candi- 
dates for the Associate of Science degree must have a grade point average 
of at least 1.95 before being accepted for their final year. 

25 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

A student academically dismissed may not be readmitted until two 
sessions have elapsed. Eligibility for readmission shall include successful 
college-level work taken in another institution or other evidence of 
maturity and motivation. 

Transfer students should have a grade point average of at least 2.00 
in order to be eligible for admission to Southern Missionary College. 

Any person coming to the senior year with a grade point average of 
less than 2.25 in the major will be placed on academic probation. 

Students with less than a 2.00 cumulative grade point average may 
not hold office in any student organization and may not participate in 
any non-academic organization which performs publicly on or off cam- 
pus. In addition, to hold any elected office in a student organization a 
student must also have a cumulative grade point average of 2.25 or a 
2.50 grade point average for the previous semester. 

CLASS AND CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

Class Attendance. Attendance at class and laboratory appoint- 
ments is required. A student's schedule is considered a contract and 
constitutes a series of obligated appointments. 

1. Absences: Absences are counted from the first scheduled 
meeting of the classes and are considered as either an excused or 
an unexcused absence. Excused absences are recognized as 
absences incurred because of illness, authorized school trips, or 
emergencies beyond the student's control. 

To have an absence recorded as an excused absence the 
student must, upon returning to class, show the instructor an 
absence excuse blank signed by the proper authority as listed 
below. He must do so within the first two class periods after he 
returns to class. 

a. Illness: Dormitory students excused by health service. Non- 
dormitory students by college or family physician or dean of 
students. Students will not be excused from classes for reasons 
of illness unless they have been in touch with the health serv- 
ice prior to missing the classes. 

b. Authorized school trips: The sponsor of the group should 
send a list of those who attended any such trip to the academic 
dean the day following the trip. He will make this list 
available to all teachers within 24 hours. If a certain person's 
name is not on the list, the instructor may record the absence 
as unexcused. 

c. All other excusable absences should be cleared through the 
academic dean. 

If the number of unexcused absences in any class exceeds 
the number of hours credit in the class, it will be cause upon 
the recommendation of the instructor, with the approval of the 
academic dean, for dismissal from the class. A grade of W or 

26 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

WF will be recorded. An instructor may consider 4 tardinesses 
as one absence. 

2. Make-up work: A student may expect to make up class work 
only if the absence is excused. All make-up work involving 
examinations and other class assignments must be completed 
within one week after the student returns to class unless an 
extension of time is arranged with the instructor. A teacher 
may have the option, if it is agreeable with the individual student, 
to give an average grade on a make-up quiz or use it as one of the 
quizzes to be thrown out if that practice is followed. However, 
if the student prefers to be given a make-up quiz, it is his pre- 
rogative and the instructor shall be obliged to do so. 

Chapel Attendance. The chapel service is provided for the spirit- 
ual and cultural benefit of the college family, to promote the interests 
of SMC, and to develop and conserve a spirit of campus unity. In 
essence the chapel attendance policy is the same as for class attend- 
ance in that no absences are permitted except for illness, authorized 
school trips, or emergency. Excuses must be presented at the Dean of 
Students office within 48 hours after the absence. It is the responsibility 
of each student to keep check of his chapel absences. Upon receiving 
the fourth unexcused absence, the student will receive a letter of advice, 
and upon receiving the fifth, a letter of warning. Additional unexcused 
absences will result in suspension from all classes pending review by the 
Student Government Committee. Continued absences may disqualify 
the student as a citizen on this campus. 

A satisfactory chapel attendance record is required for readmis- 
sion to SMC. 

SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS 

Upon recommendation of the instructor and the approval of the 
Academic Policies Committee, a student may obtain a waiver of cur- 
ricular, requirements by successfully completing comprehensive ex- 
aminations — written, oral, manipulative or otherwise, as determined 
by the instructor. Any request for waiver examinations is to be made 
at the regular registration period and the examination must be taken 
at a date within three weeks of the request being granted. A fee of 
$5.00 is assessed. See page 15 for policy relating to transfer of credit 
from professional schools. 

COLLEGE CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

In recognition of special needs, college credit by examination is 
permitted. The following rules of procedure apply: 

► Application in writing to the Academic Dean with the ap* 

Ixroval of the major professor and department chairman at 
east four weeks in advance of the proposed examination date. 

27 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

► Payment to the accounting office of a special examination fee 
of $25.00. 

y Sitting for the comprehensive examinations, written, oral, ma- 
nipulative or otherwise as determined by the instructor in col- 
laboration with the department chairman. The examination must 
be taken during the semester in which approval is granted. Ex- 
aminations for credit or for waiver may be taken only once. 

► A grade of "B" must be achieved by the student to have course 
credits recorded as college credit. 

^ Any request for credit examinations is to be made at the regular 
registration period and the examination must be taken at a date 
within three weeks of the request being granted. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION COURSES 

A maximum of twelve semester hours of correspondence or ex- 
tension credit may apply toward a baccalaureate degree program and 
eight hours toward a two-year terminal curriculum. 

The Home Study Institute of Washington, D.C., is the officially 
recognized correspondence school of Southern Missionary College. The 
college recommends the Home Study Institute for those students needing 
correspondence credit and accepts all such credits when the study pro- 
gram is approved by the academic dean prior to enrollment. 

A student will be permitted to carry correspondence or extension 
work while in residence only if the required course is unobtainable at 
the College. Correspondence courses, whether taken while in residence or 
during the summer, must be approved in advance by the Academic Dean. 

Correspondence work may not apply on the upper biennium 
requirements of the major or minor. A minimum grade of "B" must 
be earned to apply on the lower biennium requirements for a major. 
Correspondence credit with a "D" grade is unacceptable and a course 
in which the student earned a grade of "D" or "F" while in residence 
may not be repeated by correspondence. No correspondence credit will 
be entered on the student's record until he has earned a minimum of 
twelve hours in residence with an average of at least "C". To apply 
toward the requirements of a baccalaureate degree, correspondence work 
must be completed two sessions prior to graduation. A session is defined 
as a complete ten week summer session or a semester. This means that 
any student wishing to graduate in May will not be allowed to place any 
correspondence work on his transcript after his registration in the fall. 
If a student graduates at the August commencement, he will not be 
allowed to place correspondence work on his transcript after registration 
of the spring semester preceding the summer in which he graduates. 
A senior may take correspondence work during his senior year but this 
correspondence work will not apply toward graduation. 

28 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

HONORS 

The following honors program has been devised in recognition 
of quality scholarship and a commitment to learning. 

Dean's List. Students who carry a minimum of twelve semester 
hours and attain a grade point average of 3.50 or above for two con- 
secutive semesters in residence are listed on the official Dean's List. At 
the discretion of the instructor, students on the Dean's List may be given 
the opportunity to pursue planned programs of independent study in 
certain upper biennium courses designated by the instructor. 

Honorable Mention. Students who achieve a grade point average 
of 3.00 or above for a single semester with a minimum course load of 
twelve hours are given honorable mention. 

CLASS STANDING 

Freshmen 0-23 semester hours 

Sophomores 24-55 semester hours 

Juniors 56-95 semester hours 

*Seniors 96- semester hours 

The class standing for which a student qualifies generally con- 
tinues through the entire school year. Eligibility for office requires 
an acceptable scholastic and citizenship record. 

*A student may not be classified as a senior until he has filed a 
formal request with the Office of Records for spring or summer gradu 
ation candidacy. All candidates for graduation must join the senior 
class organization and meet the non-academic requirements voted by 
the class membership. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Upon the recommendation of the Academic Policies Committee 
and the approval of the faculty, a degree candidate in good and regu- 
lar standing, having attained an overall grade point average of 3.50 or 
higher, may have the degree conferred cum laude. 

GRADUATION IN ABSENTIA 

It is expected that degree graduates participate in the com- 
mencement services unless granted written permission by the Presi- 
dent of the College to be graduated in absentia. Written application 
for exemption should be made early in the second semester of the 
senior year. Permission will be granted only in instances of obvious 
necessity. A fee of ten dollars is assessed for graduating in absentia. 

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT 

The responsibility for satisfying degree requirements rests with 
the student. Each student is expected to acquaint himself with the 

29 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

various requirements published in the bulletin and to plan his course 
of study accordingly. The student may choose to meet the require- 
ments of any one bulletin in effect during the period of residency 
preceding the senior year. If he discontinues for a period of twelve 
months or more, he must qualify according to a single bulletin in force 
subsequent to his return. 

A student may become a degree candidate when he enters upon 
the school term during which it will be possible to complete all re- 
quirements for graduation. Formal application for graduation must 
be made at the Office of Records during the second semester of the 
junior year. Students transferring to SIVIC for the senior year must 
file a request at the time of registration. All resident candidates must be 
members of the senior class. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Copies of a student's academic record may be obtained by the 
student upon request to the Office of Records. The first copy of the 
transcript is issued without charge. Thereafter, a charge of $1.00 is 
assessed for each additional copy. 

SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

A student may not receive credit for a course which is a prerequisite 
for a subsequent advanced course for which he has already received credit. 



30 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

COURSE NUMBERS 

Courses numbered 1 to 49 are lower biennium courses taken 
mainly by freshmen, and 50 to 99 mainly by sophomores; those num- 
bered 100 to 149 are upper biennium courses open primarily to juniors; 
and 150 to 199 are open primarily to seniors. 

Course numbers that stand alone (e.g., 56) represent courses of 
one semester which are units in and of themselves. 

Course numbers separated by a comma (e.g., 41, 42) represent 
units in and of themselves either one of which may be counted for 
graduation without reference to sequence. 

Course numbers separated by a colon (e.g., 11:12) are year 
courses in which credit for the first course is a prerequisite to the 
second; however, credit may be given for the first semester when 
taken alone. 

Course numbers followed by a letter (e.g., 165r., 166r) may be 
repeated for credit, because of difference in subject matter. 

ALTERNATING COURSES 

Throughout the following section, courses which are not offered 
during the school year 1972-73 will be starred to the left of the course 
number (e.g., *57, 58). This arrangement of offering courses in al- 
ternate years (generally on the upper biennium level) makes possible 
the enrichment of curricula without a proportional increase of in- 
structional expense. 



ART 

Eleanor Jackson, Robert Garren 

Major; Thirty hours including: 1, 2, 9, 10, 143, 144, 191. Cognate re- 
quirement: Photography in Communications 62. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including courses 1, 2, 9, 10, 143. 

l,2r. BEGINNING DRAWING 4 hours 

An introductory course in drawing, composition and design. Emphasis on the 
basic art elements and their functions in composition using various media. 

9,1 Or. DESIGN I, II 6 hours 

Two dimensional projects considered using line, shape, color, texture. Projects in 
preparing poster, advertising brochures, lettering and magazine layout. 

48r. CRAFTS 2 hours 

Problems in crafts using a variety of materials and techniques. 

31 



ART 

51,52r. PAINTING I. II 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Art 1,2. 

An introductory course in painting. A variety of media is applied. Subject 
matter includes still life, landscape and abstraction developed in a realistic or 
stylized style. 

55, 56r. CERAMICS I, II 6 hours 

Fundamentals of the preparation and use of clay. Methods of fabrication from 
hand building to wheel-thrown wares, chemistry and application of glazes and 
stacking and firing of kilns. 

61, 62r. SCULPTURE I, II 4 hours 

Introduction to the problems of form in sculpture and three dimensional design 
using various media such as; clay, plaster, wood and metal casting. 

123,124r. DRAWING III, IV 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Art 1,2. 

A course designed to give a wider range of techniques and media involved in still 
life, landscape and clothed figure drawing. 

125, 126r. DESIGN III, IV 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Art 9, lOr. 

Contemporary trends: pencil, color washes, mockups, furniture and appliance 
styling, interior and exterior design for buildings. Problems in Printmaking will 
be developed. 

145, 146r. PAINTING III, IV 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Art 51, 52r. 

Continuation of Painting I, II with emphasis on clothed figure, composition and 
portraiture. An opportunity to explore the relationship of abstractionism and 
realism in media of choice. 

191. SENIOR PROJECT I hour 

Major propects in area of interest for senior and preparation of permanent port- 
folio of college art work. 

193. INTERNSHIP IN ART 3-4 hours 

An internship program for advanced art majors selected by the department for 
actual experience on the job with a participating firm — supervised by the Art 
Department. 

ART EDUCATION 
Edu. 58. ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 hours 

A study of the aims, philosophy and methods of teaching art on the various levels 
of the elementary school. Observation and participation in art activities with 
elementary students will be scheduled. 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING ART 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

ART HISTORY 

143. HISTORY OF ART 3 hours 
A study of the arts of western civilization from antiquity to the present with an 
emphasis on pivotal figures in art history. 

144. CONTEMPORARY ART 3 hours 
Nineteenth and twentieth century developments in European and American arts. 

32 



BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

Kenneth Kennedy, Edward Lamb, LaVeta Payne 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

This major is intended for those with an interest in the behavioral 
sciences. Students wishing to enter the fields of social work, psychology, 
personnel and guidance work, sociology or anthropology should consider 
this curriculum. In most cases, to achieve a professional level in these 
fields the student must seriously consider further preparation at the 
graduate level. 

Major: Forty hours including a core requirement Psychology 1, 
54, 90; and Sociology 20. Cognate requirements: Biology 11, 12; Religion 
157. History-Political Science 53, 54; 70 recommended. 

Psychology Emphasis — This emphasis is intended for those who 
plan to take graduate or professional work. It is recommended for 
those who are interested in the behavioral sciences and plan to take 
professional training in one of the following areas: psychology, den- 
tistry, medicine, law, guidance and counseling, occupational therapy 
and dean's work. Department requirements in addition to the core 
are: Psychology 112 and 190. It is recommended that those planning 
to pursue graduate work in psychology include mathematics through 
calculus, Mathematics 82, and French or German in their program. 
Those interested in becoming dormitory deans should certify in a 
teaching field and take Education 162. 

Social Work Emphasis — This emphasis is intended for those who 
are planning to enter social work, dean's work, or occupational 
therapy. Department requirements in addition to the core require- 
ments are: Psychology 80, 183; and Sociology 82, 156, 185. Cognate 
requirements, Business Administration 71. Those interested in be- 
coming dormitory deans should certify in a teaching field and take 
Education 162. 

AH general education requirements apply to students pursuing this 
program except the foreign language requirement. 

Minor; Eighteen hours selected from the courses identified as psy- 
chology, including six hours of upper biennium. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 hours 

An introduction to the basic principles and concepts in psychology. The develop- 
ment of the mental processes including the principles of motivation, learning and 
perception are stressed. The course is designed to help the student understand 
and explain the behavior of others and thereby be better able to predict and control 
his own life and affect the lives of those about him. 

53. MENTAL HYGIENE 2 hours 

A study of the emotional, spiritual, and intellectual factors affecting mental 
health and contributing to a sound psychological adjustment. Emphasis is on 
an analysis of personality dynamics. The prevention of mental illness is con- 
sidered and the attainment of emotional maturity is stressed. 

33 



BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

54. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY 2 hours 

A systematic study of the development, dynamics, and structure of personality. 
Heredity, physio-chemical factors, and experience in the typical crucial situa- 
tions of infancy, childhood and adolescence are considered. Methodology, theory 
and empirical research are studied in relation to personality development. 

80. GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 3 hours 

A survey of the current aims of counseling and guidance in school and com- 
munity. Basic principles, procedures, and policies of counseling and guidance 
are emphasized. Directive and non-directive methods are stressed. 

90. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 2 hours 

A basic course in growth and development from childhood through adolescence. 
Factors involving biological, psychological and sociological maturation are pre- 
sented. 

107. PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION 3 hours 

Systematic study of the principles underlying the construction and validation 
of the major varieties of tests and an introduction to the statistics of test inter- 
pretation. Emphasis is given to the utilization of test results in individual 
educational and theraputic settings. 

112. CHILD AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 hours 

This course deals with the physical, social, emotional and intellectual growth and 
development of children through adolescent. Special emphasis is given to the 
psychological factors which underlie and influence the learning process. 

115. ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 90 or 112 or permission of instructor. 
A developmental study of the theories and issues concerning adolescence with 
special emphasis on the problems of puberty, self-actualization, socialization, peer 
culture, adjustments, and the expansion of values and social consciousness. 

*155. PSYCHOLOGY OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 2 hours 

The psychological problems of exceptional children. The etiology of exceptionality. 
Nature and degree of conditions which characterize the atypical child and a wide 
variety of disabling conditions and individual adjustment in relation to disability 
are considered. 

*160. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 hours 

An examination of the physiological correlates of behavior. A study of the 
general nature of the response mechanism and the internal environment in- 
cluding the role of the sense organs, nervous system, muscles and glands in 
human behavior and personality development. This course is taught in alternate 
years. 

170. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 2 hours 

A study of the interrelationships of individuals in social situations and the 
effects upon the behavior and attitudes of individuals and groups. Dynamics of 
groups, social roles communication and mass behavior are foci of consideration. 
This course is taught in alternate years. 

183. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 and permission of the instructor. 
An examination of pathological behavior including the etiology symptoms and 
treatment of personality disturbances and mental disorders. The psychoneuroses, 
the functional and organic psychoses, character and behavior disorders and 
mental deficiency are explained. This course is taught in alternate years. 

34 



BIOLOGY 

190. PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 hours 

Individual investigation of a special problem under the direction of a staff 
member. library, laboratory or field work will be required in meeting the 
requirements. Open to majors and minors only or by permission of the de- 
partment chairman. 

195. SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 hours 

Open to Psychology majors and minors only or with approval of department 

chairman. 

A study of the main issues in Psychology, opportunities and problems in the area 

will be investigated. Research in current literature will be examined. 

SOCIOLOGY 
20. GENERAL SOCIOLOGY 3 hours 

A scientific approach to the analysis of the social world. Consideration is given to 
the dynamic nature of social structures and processes. Special emphasis is given to 
basic terms. 

82. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 2 hours 

A course in the ethics or human relationships including the place of the family 
in society, a Christian approach to the problem of marriage and family life 
and inter-relation of parents and children. 

156. FIELD OF SOCIAL WORK 3 hours 

The historical background, methods, and functions of public and private pro- 
grams in the field of social welfare. 

185. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Psychology 54, 90, 183; Sociology 20, 82, 156; and Business Admin- 
istration 71 or permission of department chairman. 

Limited to Behavioral Science majors. Two hours lecture, five hours in agency each 
week 



BIOLOGY 

Huldrich H. Kuhlman, Edgar 0. Grundset, Elbert E. Wescott, 
James E. Zeigler 

Major: Thirty hours including Biology 47, 48; 111, 145, 100 or 176; 
and 195. Up to three hours of Chemistry 172 may apply on a major. 
Cognate requirement: Chemistry 11:12. A minor in Chemistry is recom- 
mended. A course in General Physics is highly desirable. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including Biology 47, 48 (or equivalent); 
111 or 145; and 195. A course in Physiology is strongly recommended. 
A minimum of 6 hours must be in upper biennium. 

9. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 3 hours 

This is a basic biology course designed to give the non-science student a modern 
treatment of the fundamental processes and principles of plant and animal life. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

11, 12. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 6 hour* 

A study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period each week. 

35 



BIOLOGY 

15. NATURAL HISTORY 3 hours 

For the student whose interest is not primarily in science, but who wishes to 
understand the realm of living things, especially as these relate to man and his 
society. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

22. MICROBIOLOGY 3 hours 

A general study of bacteria, viruses, yeasts, molds, and pathogenic protozoa. 
Special consideration is given to the relationship of microorganisms to health 
and disease. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

47,48. FOUNDATIONS OF BIOLOGY 8 hours 

This is an introductory course in biology open to all college students. The course 
is designed to give the non-science student a modern treatment of the fundamental 
processes of plant and animal life as well as provide a satisfactory basis upon which 
a biology major may build. Three lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

51, 52. GENERAL BOTANY 6 hours 

To be taken only by students to fulfill last years requirements. Will not be of- 
fered after this year. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

96. HUMAN BIOLOGY 3 hours 

The development, structure, and function related to everyday living. The course 
is designed to apply on the basic science requirement for non-science students. A 
student may not receive credit for both Biology 11, 12 and 96. Does not apply on 
a major. Three lectures each week. 

99. ENVIRONMENTAL & CURRENT BIOLOGY 3 hours 

A course dealing with the biological aspects and current problems of today's pol- 
luted and changing environment. Three lectures each week. 

100. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 3 hours 
Prerequisites: Biology 12 or 48 or equivalent, and Chemistry 7:8 or equivalent. 
A study of the principles of animal function with special attention to man. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

107. PARASITOLOGY 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 48 or consent of instructor. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and domestic animals. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. Taught in alternate years. 

108. ORNITHOLOGY 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 9, 15, or 48 or consent of instructor. 

A systematic study of bird life with special emphasis on external features. Tax- 
onomy, nesting, and feeding habits, flight and migratory patterns. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period each week. An extended field trip, which applies to- 
ward laboratory credit, is planned on a voluntary basis during spring vacation. 

*110. ENTOMOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 9 or 15 or 48 or consent of instructor. 

An introductory study of the fundamental aspects of insect biology. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period each week. Taught upon demand during summer 
session or first semester in alternate years. 

HI. GENETICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 9 or 15 or 48 or consent of instructor. 
A study of heredity as related to man and domestic plants and animals. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

36 



BIOLOGY 

120. GENERAL ECOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 9 or 48 or consent of instructor. 

A study of plants and animals in relation to their environment. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period each week. Taught in alternate years. 

128. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 9 or 15 or consent of instructor. 

A taxonomic study of the local flowering plants. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period each week. 

*141. ICHYTHYOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 47, 48 or consent of instructor. 

A systematic study of the fishes found in the local area, with a survey of the 
fishes of other waters. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. Taught 
in alternate years. 

143. HERPETOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 47, 48 or consent of instructor. 

A systematic study of amphibians and reptiles of the local area, with a survey of 
amphibians and reptiles of other areas. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
each week. Taught in alternate years. 

145. GENERAL EMBRYOLOGY 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 47, 48 or consent of instructor. 

An introduction to the development of the vertebrate animal with emphasis on 
the development of the chick. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 

146. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 47, 48 or consent of instructor. 

A comparison of the anatomy of the various organ systems of vertebrates. The 
dogfish shark, mud puppy, cat, and/or fetal pig are used for laboratory study. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. Taught in alternate years. 

*176. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 47,48: Chemistry 11:12 or consent of instructor. 
A study of the functions of plant organs. Topics covered include water relations, 
mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, transpiration, translocation, respiration and 
growth. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. Taught in alternate 
years. 

*178. ANIMAL HISTOLOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 47, 48 or consent of instructor. 

A descriptive study of normal tissues, including those of man. The microscopic 
identification and characteristics of stained section is emphasized in the laboratory. 
One lecture, two laboratory periods each week. Taught in alternate years. 

192. SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 hours 

Designed for the student who wishes to do private study or research; and for a 
group of students who wish a special course not listed in the regular offerings. 
Content and method of study must be arranged for prior to registration. 

195. BIOLOGY SEMINAR I hour 

Open to Biology majors or minors only. 

Reports are made on some specific problem in the field of Biology and on 
current literature in the field. To be taken in the senior year or with approval 
of department chairman. 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING BIOLOGY 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

37 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Wayne VandeVere, Cecil Rolfe, Jan Rushing 

Major — Business Administration: Forty-five hours for the Bachelor 
of Science with a major in business administration including courses 31: 
32; 61:62; 71, 72; 129; 142; 144; 152; 155, 156, 197r. Cognate require- 
ments: Office Administration 13 or equivalent, and Math 36 and 82. 

Major — Accounting: Forty-five hours for the Bachelor of Science 
with a major in accounting including courses 31:32; 61:62; 71, 72; 102; 
112; 152; 155, 156; 160; 171, 197r. Cognate requirements: Office Admin- 
istration 76 or Computer Science 3 hours and Office Administration 13 
or equivalent, and Math 36 and 82. 

Students preparing for the C.P.A. examinations are advised to take 
course 191, 192 — C.P.A. Review Problems. 

General Education Requirements 

The general education requirements for the above degree programs 
are the same as those listed for the Bachelor of Arts degree with the ex- 
ception of foreign language study. 

Bachelor of Science degrees in Business Administration and Account- 
ing do not require a minor. However, a minor in Mathematics or Com- 
puter Science is highly recommended. 

Minor — Business Administration: Eighteen hours including courses 
31:32; 71, 72; and six hours of upper biennium from courses listed as 
accounting or general business. 

Minor — Economics: Eighteen hours including courses 71, 72; 133; 
and 134 and six other hours from courses listed as economics. Economics 
71, 72 may not apply on a major in Business Administration or Account- 
ing if the student has an economics minor. 

ACCOUNTING 

31:32. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 6 hours 

A course in the fundamentals of accounting theory. A two-hour study lab will be 
required. 

61:62. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 31:32. 

Accounting principles and theory. Preparation of statements. Intensive study 
and analysis of the classification and evaluation of balance sheet accounts. 

102. COST ACCOUNTING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61. 

The general principles of job order and process cost accounting, including the 
control of burden. This course is taught in alternate years. 

38 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

103. ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 102. 

A study of standard costing, direct costing, break-even analysis, estimated costs, 
distribution costs and specialized problems in cost determination. This course is 
taught in alternate years. 

•112. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

Consideration of problems concerned with consolidated financial statements, part- 
nerships, businesses in financial difficulty, estates and trusts. This course is taught 
in alternate years. 

131. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

A course designed to show and explain the accounting principles and procedures 
applicable to both state and local governments, including counties, townships, 
cities and villages, school districts, and certain institutions such as hospitals, 
colleges and universities. This course is taught in alternate years. 

*160. AUDITING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

Accepted standards and procedures applicable to auditing and related types of 
public accounting work. This course is taught in alternate years. 

171. FEDERAL INCOME TAXES 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 31:32. 

This course of study is designed to provide a comprehensive explanation of the 
Federal Tax structure, and to provide training in the application of the tax 
principles to specific problems. The attention of the student is directed mainly 
to those taxes applicable to the Federal Government, which includes the Income 
Tax, Social Security, Estate and Gift Tax. Mention is made of state and local 
taxes applicable to the State of Tennessee. 

191, 192. C.P.A. REVIEW PROBLEMS 6 hours 

Prerequisite: By permission of instructor. 

Includes a study of accounting theory as exemplified by the accounting research 
bulletins of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. 

ECONOMICS 

71, 72. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 6 hours 

A survey course in the fundamentals of economics; the institutions, forces, and 
factors affecting production, evaluation, exchange, and distribution of wealth in 
modern society. 

*133. THE PRICE SYSTEM 3 hours 

A study of the behavior of business firms under fully and imperfectly competitive 
conditions. Pricing of products and productive resources. This course is taught 
in alternate years. 

134. INCOME AND EMPLOYMENT THEORY 3 hours 

An analysis of the forces that determine general level of prices, output and 
employment. This course is taught in alternate years. 

139. MONEY AND BANKING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71, 72. 

Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their services, the Federal 
Reserve System, and other financial institutions are considered. This course is 
taught in alternate years. 



39 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

*176. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3 hours 

A study of the characteristics and functions of economic systems. Analysis of 
alternative patterns of economic control, planning and market structure. Con- 
sideration of their theories and philosophies. This course is taught in alternate 
years. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

41. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 3 hours 

An introductory course to give familiarity with economic concepts, business prac- 
tices, and business terminology. 

129. MARKETING 3 hours 

A study of the nature and functions of marketing. Includes marketing institutions, 
basic problems in the marketing of commodities and services, price policies, and 
competitive practices. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 3 hours 

An analysis of business policies viewed from the standpoint of the functional 
characteristics of management processes and current ethics. 

144. ADVANCED MANAGEMENT 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Business 142. 

This course of study is designed to give the student experience in decision-making 
and problem solving through the case method. The attention of the student is 
directed to defining, analyzing and proposing alternative solutions to business 
problems from management's viewpoint. 

*147. PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 3 hours 

An introduction to the organization, training, motivation, and direction of em- 
ployees with a view to maintaining their productivity and morale at high levels. 
Among topics covered are: selection, training, compensation and financial in- 
centives, work standards, techniques of supervision and leadership. This course 
is taught in alternate years. 

152. BUSINESS FINANCE 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

A study of the fundamental principles of financial organization. Emphasis on 
instruments of finance, policies of capitalization, problems pertaining to work- 
ing capital, and corporate expansion and reorganization. 

153. SECURITY ANALYSIS 3 hours 
Analysis of individual issues and the various classes of securities through the 
use of financial data. Derivation of investment values for individual securities, 
including intrinsic and market values, through application of analytical prin- 
ciples and techniques. This course is taught in alternate years. 

155, 156. BUSINESS LAW 6 hours 

The nature and social functions of law; social control through law; the law 
of commercial transactions and business organization. 

158. BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT 3 hours 

A study of the ways in which business and economic life are shaped and directed 
by government. The legal framework within which business is conducted and 
the evolution of public policy toward business are examined. 

175. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROBLEMS 1-2 hours 

Individual research work open only to business majors. Content to be arranged. 
Approval must be secured from department head prior to registration. 

40 



CHEMISTRY 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING BUSINESS 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

197r. SEMINAR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 2 hours 

This course will include the Eugene Anderson Lecture Series in business. Top 
men in their field will present lectures in insurance, real estate, finance, retailing, 
production management, etc. Ten lectures and two testing sessions will be re- 
quired. This course may be repeated for credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

John Christensen, M. D. Campbell, Mitchel Thiel 

Major: Thirty hours including courses 11:12, 113:114, 117 (5 
hours), and either 151 and 152, or 133, or 144 and 190. Mathematics 
51:52 is a cognate requirement. Chemistry 144 may count toward 
the applied arts requirement. To complement the major in Chemistry, a 
minor in Biology, Mathematics or Physics is recommended. Mathematics 
91 and Physics 51:52 and 61:62 are advised. German is recommended 
in fulfillment of the foreign language requirement. Basic Electronics 70 
may fulfill the requirements for Glassblowing 144 but does not count on 
a Chemistry major. 

Major: Forty hours for the Bachelor of Science with a major in 
Chemistry including courses 11:12, 113:114, 117 (5 hours), 121, 133, 
144, 151, 152, 153, 154, 190*; and cognate requirements of Mathematics 
51:52, 91; and Physics 51:52 and 61:62. To complement the major 
in Chemistry a minor should be chosen from Mathematics, Biology, 
Physics or Foods and Nutrition**. Elementary Modern Physics 101 may 
be applied toward a B.A. or B.S. degree in Chemistry. Basic Electronics 
70 may fulfill the requirements for Glassblowing 144 but does not count 
on a Chemistry major. General Education requirements are as follows: 

Applied and Fine Arts (Humanities may apply) 5 hours 

Foreign Language — German 93:94 6 hours 

College Composition 6 hours 

Physical Education and Health 4 hours 

Speech or Literature 2 hours 

Religion including 3 of the following: 10, 50, 105 12 hours 

Social Science, including a six-hour sequence 9 hours 

This degree is intended to prepare the student for graduate work in 
Chemistry or for a professional career in Chemistry. Except by special 



•Students planning to do graduate work in Biochemistry should elect 172 
as part of the major and should also take Biology 22, 47 and 48. 

**Students minoring in Foods and Nutrition should also elect 172 as part 
of the major. 

41 



CHEMISTRY 

arrangement, German is to be chosen in fulfillment of the foreign lan- 
guage requirement. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including course 113:114. Chemistry 117 is 
highly recommended. 

The normal sequence of courses in a chemistry major are: First 
year, 11:12; second year, 113:114; third year, 117, 151, 152, 153, 154; 
fourth year, 190, 144 and electives. 

5. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY 3 hours 

An introduction to the elementary principles of chemistry and their applica- 
tions to everyday life. Especial emphasis is given to chemical demonstrations 
with simple equipment. This course will not apply on any curriculum if 
Chemistry 7, 11:12 is taken. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

7:8. SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY 6 hours 

Prerequisites: High school algebra, and either high school Physics or Chemistry, 
or permission of instructor. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles of 
chemistry. Attention is given particularly to solutions, chemistry of nutrition, 
digestion, and metabolism. Of special interest to students who need a survey 
course in chemistry. It will also fulfill the natural science requirement. It is a 
terminal course and may not be used as a prerequisite for advanced chemistry 
courses. Chemistry 7 will not apply on any curriculum if Chemistry 11:12 or 13:14 
is taken. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. Students who fail 
to make a satisfactory grade may be asked to attend class an extra day per week. 

11:12. GENERAL CHEMISTRY 8 hours 

Prerequisite: High school algebra and either high school physics or chemistry. 
Mathematics 5, or a passing score on the mathematics placement examination 
covering Algebra II, must be taken concurrently with General Chemistry or 
preferably before. Any exception to the above requirement will require the 
instructor's permission. 

An introduction to the elements and their principal compounds; the fundamental 
laws and accepted theories of chemistry. The second semester includes some 
work in qualitative analysis. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, and 
one hour quiz section each week. Students who maintain a required grade in the 
course will be excused from the quiz section after the first test. 

*15. MINERALOGY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Any chemistry course, high school or college. 

A study of the classes of rocks and minerals and their identification and utilization. 
Two hours of lecture. The third hour consists of field trips, laboratory work and 
some lectures. Does not apply on a major or minor in chemistry. 

113:114. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 11:12. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and their reactions. 
The laboratory work includes typical syntheses of various compounds. Three 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

117. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 or 5 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 11:12. 

This course includes the study of typical volumetric and gravimetric methods, 
quantitative determinations of acidity, alkalinity, and percentage composition 
of a variety of unknowns with the related theory and problems. Three hours 
lecture, three or six hours laboratory, each week. 



42 



CHEMISTRY 

121. ORGANIC QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 2 or 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113:114. 

Application of solubility principles, classification reactions and the preparation 
of derivatives for the identification of both pure compounds and mixtures. Two 
hours of lecture for nine weeks, and three or six hours of laboratory each week. 
Offered on sufficient demand. 

122. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113:114. 

A study of advanced topics in organic chemistry such as hetrocyclic com- 
pounds, bonding theory, mechanisms, natural products, etc. Two hours lecture 
each week. Taught in odd years on sufficient demand. 

123. ORGANIC PREPARATIONS I hour 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113:114. 

A course in the preparation of representative organic compounds, either syn- 
thetically or by isolation from natural sources. One laboratory period each 
week. Taught in odd years on sufficient demand. 

*U3. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 117, 151, 152. 

A study of the theories, techniques and instruments involved in spectrometry, 
chromatography, electrochemistry and radiochemistry. Three class periods per 
week, one of which is a laboratory discussion period, and one five-hour laboratory 
period each week. Taught in even years on sufficient demand. 

144. LABORATORY GLASS BLOWING I or 2 hours 

Training is given in the manipulation of glass for the fabrication of laboratory 
apparatus. Three or six hours laboratory each week. This course does not count 
on basic science requirements nor on the minor. 

*151. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 11:12, Physics 51:52, Mathematics 52. 
A study of gases, kinetic theory, liquids, solids and thermodynamics. Three 
hours lecture each week. 

*152. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 151. 

A study of electrochemistry and conductivity, reaction kinetics, molecular struc- 
ture, nuclear chemistry, adsorption and colloids. Three hours lecture each week. 

*153,154. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 2 hours 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 117, also Chemistry 151, 152 must be taken concur- 
rently or previously. Experiments chosen to illustrate material in Chemistry 
151, 152. One laboratory period each week. 

*U2. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 117 or instructor's permission. 

A study of selected topics such as quantum theory, wave mechanics, chemical 
bonding, periodic properties, coordination, stereochemistry, and nonaqueous sol- 
vents. Two hours lecture each week. Taught in even years on sufficient demand. 

*163. INORGANIC PREPARATIONS I hour 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 117 or instructor's permission. 

A variety of laboratory syntheses of inorganic compounds and complexes and 
their characterization, in some cases. One laboratory period each week. Taught 
in even years on sufficient demand. 

43 



COMMUNICATIONS 

172. BIOCHEMISTRY 5 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 113:114 or 7:8 with no grade lower than a U C". 
The materials, mechanisms, and end-products of the processes of life under nor- 
mal and pathological conditions are studied. Four hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory, each week. 

190. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH I to 2 hours 

Prerequisite: 20 hours of Chemistry, or permission of the instructor. 
Individual research under the direction of the members of the staff. Problems 
are assigned according to the experience and interest of the student. Prior to 
registration, two semesters before graduation, students are urged to contact all 
chemistry staff members with respect to choice of available problems. Should 
be taken not later than the first semester of the senior year. 

Edu.167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING CHEMISTRY 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Donald Dick, Curtis Carlson, William Garber, James C. Hannum, 
Genevieve McCormick, William H. Taylor 

Major: Thirty-two hours including (a) basic requirements of Broad- 
casting 16, 77; Communications 101, 102; Journalism 53, 54, 165; Speech 
1, 64 and (b) 12 hours in Broadcasting, Journalism, or Speech emphasis: 
Broadcasting Emphasis — Broadcasting 128 and 158, plus 6 hours 
elected within the overall departmental offerings, 3 of which 
must be in Broadcasting. 
Journalism Emphasis — Journalism 62, 126, and 183 plus 5 hours 
elected within the overall departmental offerings, 3 of which 
must be in Journalism. 
Speech Emphasis — Speech 63, 113, and 117 or 118, plus 4 hours 

elected within the overall departmental offerings. 
Cognate requirements include: Industrial Education 25. 
Recommended courses include: English 123, Psychology 170, His- 
tory 51, Geography 41, Political Science 70, 162, Library Science 
53 and Art 9. 

Minor — Communications: Eighteen hours from within the depart- 
mental offerings including Speech 1, Journalism 53, Broadcasting 16, 77, 
Communications 101 and 102, with a minimum of six hours of upper 
biennium work from overall departmental offerings. 

Minor — Broadcasting: Eighteen hours from within departmental 
offerings including Broadcasting 16, 77 9 128, and Communications 101 
with a minimum of six hours within the minor to be upper biennium in 
Broadcasting. 

Minor — Journalism: Eighteen hours including Journalism 53:54, 

44 



COMMUNICATIONS 

165, Communications 102 with a minimum of six hours in the upper 
biennium in Journalism. 

Minor — Speech: Eighteen hours including Speech 1, 63, 64, 113, 
Communications 101, with a minimum of six hours in the upper bien- 
nium in Speech. 

RADIO STATION 

Communications students at Southern Missionary College have op- 
portunities for realistic learning experiences in connection with the 
college's educational radio station, WSMC-FM. 

WSMC-FM is an 80,000 watt, stereo, non-commercial educational 
radio station, operated by the Communications Department and is one of 
the most powerful in the nation. 

The studios of WSMC-FM are located in Lynn Wood Hall and are 
equipped with the latest electronic components. With three control rooms, 
studios, record library, and offices, the station is adequate for diversified 
radio programming and production. 

The Collins 10-kilowatt transmitter and the 200-foot tower carrying 
the eight bay antenna system are located on White Oak Moun- 
tain some three miles south of the campus. The range of the station 
signal varies from a rough circle of one hundred miles to thrusts up to 
two hundred miles in directions particularly favorable to transmission. 

Communications majors who include radio courses in their prepara- 
tion are encouraged to participate in the many aspects of the total pro- 
gram of WSMC-FM. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The journalistic output of the Public Relations office of the college, 
the editing of the Associated Press teletype news service for WSMC-EM, 
and the Student Association publications — Campus Accent, Southern 
Accent, Southern Memories, and Joker all provide students with varied 
opportunities to put journalistic principles into practice. 

INTERNSHIPS IN JOURNALISM, PUBLIC RELATIONS, AND BROADCASTING 

A program of journalism and public relations internships for 
selected communications majors has been developed. This program 
(which has been approved by the General Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists) calls for an internee to associate with a publishing house, a 
newspaper, an educational or medical institution, for an arranged 
period, working directly with the institution in its editing, publishing, 
or public relations activities. A scholarship is provided for the internee 
and a proportionate amount of academic credit is available under the 
supervision of the Communications Department of the college in 
Journalism 193. 

A program of broadcasting internships is also available. This 
program calls for an internee to associate with a commercial or non- 
commercial broadcasting organization for an arranged period, working 
directly with the professional broadcasters in various phases of radio 

45 



COMMUNICATIONS 

or TV station operation or production. A scholarship is provided for the 
internee and a proportionate amount of academic credit is available under 
the supervision of the Communications Department in Broadcasting 196. 

BROADCASTING 

16. AUDIO CONTROL TECHNIQUES I hour 

Operation of microphones, tape recorders, mixers, patch panels, turntables, car- 
tridge tape recorders, etc. Meets two hours each week during the first half of 
each semester. 

36. RADIO-TV ANNOUNCING 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and prior completion or concurrent registra- 
tion in Broadcasting 16. 

Radio and television announcing, interview techniques, preparation and delivery 
of newscasts. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory each week. (Labora- 
tory may be fulfilled by on-the-air performance for those qualified.) 

39r.l39r. APPLIED BROADCASTING 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Membership on WSMC-FM staff and permission of instructor. 
WSMC-FM staff members who wish to broaden their job-related knowledge, skills, 
and experience may receive academic credit through guided reading, research, 
experimentation, training sessions, staff meetings, and projects. The course may 
be repeated up to 4 hours toward graduation. 

77. SURVEY OF RADIO-TV 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Prior completion or concurrent registration in Broadcasting 16. 
A survey of the radio and television media and their roles in society, with training 
and practice in development, writing, and production of various types of radio 
programs. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

128. TELEVISION PRODUCTION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Broadcasting 16 and 77 or permission of instructor. 
Camera, switcher, special effects generator, and videotape recorder operation. 
Elementary TV lighting, scripting, production and direction. Study of TV 
graphics, picture composition, and storyboard preparation. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory each week. 

158. WRITING FOR RADIO/TV/FILM 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Broadcasting 16 and 77. 

Fundamentals of script preparation for commercial, public service, dramatic, docu- 
mentary and other formats for broadcasting and film production. This course 
taught in alternate years. 

167. FILM PRODUCTION I 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Journalism 62 or permission of instructor. 

Elements of film theory and production from first conceptualization through story- 
board, script, film exposure, and editing. Emphasis on conceptualization, com- 
munication, and practical aspects. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory each 
week. 

168. FILM PRODUCTION II 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Broadcasting 167, 16, and 77 or permission of instructor. 
Continuation of Broadcasting 167 with emphasis on sound film production and 
editing. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory per week. 

46 



COMMUNICATIONS 

*178. BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AND MANAGEMENT 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Broadcasting 16 and 77 or permission of instructor. 
Study of market analysis, broadcasting formats, steps in establishment of broad- 
cast stations, and station management. This course taught in alternate years. 

196. INTERNSHIP IN BROADCASTING 2-4 hours 
A specialized internship program for selected upper division communications 
majors at a participating institution whereby the student obtains actual experience 
in communications media under the supervision of the Communications Depart- 
ment. 

197. SPECIAL PROJECTS IN RADIO/TV/FILM 1-4 hours 
(In the series of special projects courses, not more than 4 hours may apply on the 
communications major. Courses in this series may be repeated. Basic courses in the 
respective areas, and the written aproval of head of department are prerequisites to 
the special projects series of courses.) 

COMMUNICATIONS 

101. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIONS THEORY 2 hours 
Introducing the processes and effects of communication, this course gives attention 
to models of communication, to the psychology, sociology and semantics of the 
communications process. 

102. SURVEY OF MASS COMMUNICATIONS 2 hours 
A study of the communications process in professional journalism and in the 
mass communications industries of modern society, with special consideration 
of the Christian segment of society, both as consumers and dispensers of 
information. 

195. COMMUNICATIONS SEMINAR I hour 

Reports on various topics in communications are prepared and presented to a 
group of communications students and faculty members. Open to Communications 
majors and minors. 

JOURNALISM** 

53. NEWS REPORTING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: English 1-2. 

Practice in newswriting and general reporting of church, school and community 

affairs for the public press. Study is given to the duties of the reporter in 

newsgathering and to his relationship to editorial requirements. Offered each 

semester. 

54. NEWS EDITING 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Journalism 53. 

Instruction is given in copyediting, headline writing, layout, and other editorial 
responsibilities through the various phases of newspaper production from copy to 
final print form. One lecture, three hours lab per week. Offered each semester. 

62. PHOTOGRAPHY IN COMMUNICATIONS 3 hours 

Introduction to photography. Experience in taking, developing, and printing pic- 
tures and preparing them for submission to editors. Two hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory each week. 



*As a prerequisite to all Journalism courses except Journalism 62 it is necessary that 
the student have a competency in typewriting adequate to the demands of the course. 
The instructor in the course will indicate the level of these requirements. If a 
student has not had adequate typewriting instruction, he will be required to enroll 
in the Beginning Typewriting course in the Office Administration Department. 

47 



COMMUNICATIONS 

126. ARTICLE WRITING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: English 1-2. 

Preparation and marketing of feature articles for newspapers and magazines; 
market analysis; writing for specialized markets. 

157. EDITING AND PRODUCTION OF PUBLICATIONS 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Industrial Education 25. 

Editorial techniques and problems from the arrival of the manuscript in the 
editor's office until the publication reaches the reader. Relationships with authors, 
manuscript handling, payment, layout and illustrations; relationships with art, 
composing, proofreading, and press rooms; circulation and distribution problems 
as they affect the editor. This course is taught in alternate years. 

158. WRITING FOR RADIO/TV/FILM 3 hours 
Prerequisites: Broadcasting 16 and 77. 

Fundamentals of script preparation for commercial, public service, dramatic, 
documentary and other formats for broadcasting and film production. This course 
is taught in alternate years. 

165. PUBLIC RELATIONS 3 hours 
Designed to give professional competence in the theory and practice of public 
relations, the course .is a study of the plans and methods of disseminating news 
from business establishments and from institutions through all the media of 
communications. 

166. PUBLIC RELATIONS CAMPAIGNS 3 hours 
A study of successful public relations campaigns, analyzing plans, methods, 
and materials used. Emphasis is put on development programs for all types 
of institutions. 

183. READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF JOURNALISM I hour 

Readings selected by the student under the direction of the instructor from the 
history of journalism as well as current periodicals. 

193. INTERNSHIP IN JOURNALISM/PUBLIC RELATIONS 2-4 hours 
(See note under Broadcasting 196.) 

194. SPECIAL PROJECTS IN JOURNALISM 1-4 hours 
(See note under Broadcasting 197.) 

SPEECH 

1. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC SPEAKING 2 hours 

Establishment of a basic approach to speech, an elementary survey of the area, 
and an opportunity to develop speaking ability in various speech situations. 

63. VOICE AND DICTION 2 hours 

An introductory study of the speech mechanism and the improvement of its 
functioning, with special attention to individual problems. 

64. ORAL INTERPRETATION 2 hours 

ITieory and practice in the art of conveying to others the full meaning of 
selected readings in literature. 

113. PERSUASION 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Speech 1 and Communications 101, or permission of instructor. 
A study and development of the art of discovering all the available means of 
persuasion in a variety of communication situations, both religious and secular. 

48 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 

*U7. DISCUSSION AND LEADERSHIP 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Speech 1 and Communications 101, or permission of instructor. 
Analysis of the role and types of discussion used in solving problems and gathering 
information, along with a study of the dimensions of leadership and the basic 
principles of parliamentary procedure. Emphasis given to the practical applica- 
tion of discussion and leadership skills essential for modern society and the church. 
This course taught in alternate years. 

*118. ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Speech 1 and Communications 101, or permission of instructor. 
Introduction to basic forms of logic and argument together with opportunity to 
apply the principles of argumentation in the debate situation. Emphasis on 
construction and delivery of clear, well-supported argument. This course taught 
in alternate years. 

164. ADVANCED ORAL INTERPRETATION 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 64 or permission of instructor. 

Analysis of the philosophy and the performance of special types of literature. 
Consideration of literary interpretation as a fine art. Planning the oral 
reading recital and program. This course is taught in alternate years. 

191. SPECIAL PROJECTS IN SPEECH 1-4 hours 

(See note under Broadcasting 197.) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Robert McCurdy 

Minor: Eighteen hours including 55, 75, 150; or permission of de- 
partment head for alternate courses. Either 44 or 54 can apply but not 
both. 

Students planning to do graduate work in computer science should 
consult with the department head as early as possible to facilitate meet- 
ing graduate school entrance requirements. Proper use of 191 will fulfill 
requirements. Mathematics through Calculus is essential. It is recom- 
mended that the student have a major in Accounting, Mathematics, or 
Physics. 

44. INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING I hour 

Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra. 

A general education course stressing a simple approach to the basic concepts of 
programming. Sample programs are studied. The student writes several programs. 

45:46. NUMERICAL COMPUTATIONS LABORATORY 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 44. These courses should be taken concurrently 
with or following Mathematics 51 and 52. 

An algorithmic and numeric approach to various topics in the calculus using the 
digital computer. 

54. INTRODUCTION TO DATA PROCESSING 3 hours 

A survey course in data processing. The student is introduced to data processing 
methods with emphasis on unit record terminology and equipment. (Key punch, 

49 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 

interpreter, sorter, reproducing punch, collator, tabulator and accounting ma- 
chines). Flow charting and computer language, programming, and mathematics 
are also studied. 

55. FORTRAN COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra, Computer Science 44 or 54 
or the permission of the instructor. 

A thorough study of Fortran programming, writing, and debugging techniques, 
designing a system, and disk and tape operations. The student writes numerous 
programs for both the commercial and scientific applications. 

67r. COMPUTER SCIENCE TOPICS I hour 

An introduction to machine architecture, organization, machine language, special 
purpose high level languages; and selected current literature, trends and advance- 
ments in computer science will be studied and discussed along with documentation 
and software library procedures. Team and/or individual term projects, related 
to the students' interest and level, will be assigned. Proposals, progress reports, 
and final reports, oral and/or written, will be required. This course provides 
opportunity for communication between all computer science students. May be 
repeated up to four hours. 

70. INTRODUCTION TO COBOL PROGRAMMING I hour 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 44 or 54 or the permission of the instructor. 
Accounting 31:32 recommended. 
The rules of Cobol programming are studied. The student writes several programs. 

75. SYMBOLIC ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 44 or 54 or the permission of the instructor. 
Computer structure, machine language, instruction execution, addressing tech- 
niques, and digital representation of data. Computer systems organization, Sym- 
bolic coding and assembly systems and program segmentation and linkage. Sys- 
tems and utility programs, programming techniques, and recent developments in 
computing. Several computer projects to illustrate basic machine structure and 
programming techniques. 

140. DATA STRUCTURES 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 55 and 75; Mathematics 41. 

Basic concepts of data. Linear lists, strings, arrays, and orthogonal lists. Repre- 
sentation of trees and graphs. Storage systems and structures, and storage allo- 
cation and collection. Multilinked structures. Formal specification of data struc- 
tures, data structures in programming languages, and generalized data manage- 
ment systems. 

*150. SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 55 and 75; Mathematics 41. 
Review of batch process systems programs, their components and operating char- 
acteristics. Linkage between programs, sorting techniques, file system organiza- 
tion. Sample systems will be analyzed and evaluated. The student will design 
and write programs for an entire system. 

191. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-6 hours 

This course consists of individual study and/or research and the content will be 
adjusted to meet the particular need of the individual student. Approval must 
be secured from the department head prior to registration. 

50 



EDUCATION 



EDUCATION 



Stuart Berkeley, Sue Baker, M. D. Campbell, Thelma Cushman, 

Floyd Greenleaf, Kenneth Kennedy, Harold Kuebler, LaVeta Payne, 

Marvin Robertson, Mildred Spears, Richard Stanley, 

Nelson Thomas, Drew Turlington. 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS— SECONDARY 

Ronald Barrow Orlo Gilbert 

Roy Battle David Knecht 

Glenda Clark Harold Kuebler 

Don Crook Roger Miller 

Sylvia Crook Charles Read 

Robert Davidson Charles Robertson 

Joyce Dick Charles Swinson 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS— ELEMENTARY 

Weston Babbitt Joan Linebaugh 

Richard Christoph Geraldine Miller 

Patricia Geach Thyra Sloan 

June Gorman Barbara Stanaway 

Margaret Halverson Gordon Swanson 

Howard Kennedy Dianne Tennant 
Peggy King 

The SMC program of Teacher Education is approved by the Ten- 
nessee State Board of Education, Department of Education of the 
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges for Teacher Education, and the elementary education 
program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation oi 
Teacher Education (NCATE). 

DEPARTMENTAL AIMS 

Courses in education are offered to provide the necessary profes- 
sional preparation to meet certification requirements for public and 
church related elementary and secondary school teaching, to afford a 
general understanding of the school as a social institution for those enter- 
ing services other than teaching, and to serve as prerequisites to grad- 
uate programs. 

PROGRAMS AND ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

The teacher education programs are founded upon a liberal arts 
demand for breadth and depth of knowledge and experience, and on the 
idea that a teacher should be a good example in health, intellect, and 
character. 

A student who wishes to be admitted to the teacher education pro- 
gram must file a formal application with the Department of Education 
prior to the end of his sophomore year. Upper class transfer students 
must file application the first semester in residence. The applicant must 
show a 2.0 average for all courses taken during the first two years, 

51 



EDUCATION 

demonstrate competence in basic English communication skills, and 
show evidence of physical, moral, and mental fitness, emotional ma- 
turity, and professional commitment. 

The Teacher Education Council will admit competent individuals 
to take professional courses in education, and recommend them for 
certification and graduation. Professional education courses include all 
courses listed under Education and the following from the area of Be- 
havioral Science: Psychology 53, 80, 90, 107, 112, 115, 155. 

The criteria for admission to teacher education, outlines of teaching 
majors in secondary education and policies and procedures related to 
student teaching, may be obtained from the Department of Education. 

MAJOR— ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Education courses required are 5, *21, 58, 65, 125 or 130, 138, 142, 
163, 171, 191, Psychology 112 for the Bachelor of Science Curriculum. 

Students may elect to take a major and a minor in subject matter 
fields or a composite major consisting of a minimum of 15 hours each 
in four teaching fields. An over-all grade point average of 2.00 is required 
with a 2.25 grade point average required in the four teaching fields and 
professional education. 

Each student will be responsible for determining the additional 
courses that may be required for certification in the state of his choice. 
This information can be obtained at the office of Admissions and Records 
or the Department of Education. Electives are to be selected to enrich 
teaching areas, six hours of which should be upper biennium. 

Students interested in the area of teacher-librarian should include 
the Courses offered under Library Science. 

Students who desire a kindergarten endorsement should include in 
their program of studies Education 160, Home Economics 131. 

The following requirements apply only to students pursuing a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education. 

Humanities, 50 4 hours 

Language Arts Including English 1-2, Library Science 
105, Literature, Speech 4 semester hours (Speech 
63, and 64 recommended) 16 hours 

Mathematics (including Math 1 plus 3 additional hours) 6 hours 

Science (Natural & Physical Science represented): 

Biology 15; Chemistry 5, & Physics 1 recommended) 12 hours 

Physical Education [including 22 (or a current Ad- 
vanced Red Cross First Aid Certificate), 53, 152, 
two semester hours of activity courses, Sociology 82].. 12 hours 

Religion (including 2 of the following: 10, 50, 105) 12 hours 

Social Science (including Geography 41 and 

History 148, and a six-hour sequence) 12 hours 

* Education 21 not accepted for Tennessee state certification. 

52 



EDUCATION 

SECONDARY PROGRAM 

Admission to the Department of Teacher Education is the same as 
for the major in Elementary Education. 

In the first semester of the junior year the student, in consultation 
with his major professor and the chairman of the Department of Educa- 
tion, must work out a program of studies leading to a degree and 
meeting certification requirements. Two approved teaching fields, a 
major field and a minor field, for the student are highly recommended. 
The program forms may be obtained in the Department of Education. 

Certification requirements vary from state to state. The following 
courses are required: Education* 21, 166, 173, 191, and Psychology 112. 
. Students who plan to teach on the junior high school level should include 
in their program Education 142. Each student will be responsible to 
determine the additional courses that may be required for certification in 
the state of his choice. This information can be obtained at the Office of 
Admissions and Records or the Department of Education. 

Students who desire State of Tennessee certification should meet 
the above requirements plus six additional hours of professional edu- 
cation. The following courses are recommended: Education 138, 130, 142, 
and 162; Psychology 1, 80, 107, 115. In the area of general education, two 
fields must be represented in social science; two additional semester 
hours should be taken in family development for the area of physical 
education, health and family development; three hours of the science; 
and mathematics requirement must be Mathematics 1. 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 
5. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING 2 hours 

The student is given an opportunity to become acquainted with the needed 
personal and professional traits, duties, and responsibilities of the teacher. Obser- 
vation and participation in classroom at all grade levels. Two class periods per 
week plus special assignments. 

21. FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATION 2 hours 

A survey of the basic principles of education. The course also examines the funda- 
mental philosophy of Christian education. 

58. ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 hours 

Exploratory activities designed to acquaint the students with materials, methods, 
and procedures for the teaching of art on the various instructional levels. 
A brief study of the basic principles of art and art appreciation is included. 
Observation and participation in the art activities of the elementary school 
will be scheduled. 

65. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MUSIC 3 hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the music activities in the ele- 
mentary school. The content includes fundamentals, appreciation, singing, play- 
ing, and rhythmic activities. Observation and participation in the music of the 
elementary school is required. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory 
work per week. 

125. TEACHING OF READING 3 hours 

A study is made of the materials and methods used in teaching reading in the 
elementary grades. Two hours lecture and discussion, three hours laboratory 
work each week. 

53 



EDUCATION 

130. CORRECTIVE READING 2-3 hours 

Diagnostic techniques and materials and methods for individual and group instruc- 
tion for elementary and secondary classroom teachers. 

138. AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION 2 hours 

A laboratory course in the selection, operation and use of audio-visual equipment 
and materials. Preparation of transparencies, flat pictures, graphics and audio 
materials will be required. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

142. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 2 hours 

This course is to help elementary and secondary teachers and religion majors to 
understand the organization and administration of classroom and school manage- 
ment. 

160. KINDERGARTEN MATERIALS AND METHODS 3 hours 

A study of the philosophy, methods, materials and acceptable standards involved 
in the organization and instructional procedures of a kindergarten program. 

162. ADMINISTRATIVE AND PERSONNEL WORK OF DEANS 2 hours 

A basic professional course in the administration of the school home. (Offered 
on demand.) 

163 A&B. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course is designed to meet the students' needs in general methods in the 
teaching of Bible, Social Science, English, Mathematics and Science. The course 
will be offered the first half of each semester, ten periods each week plus four 
periods of lab work. Directed observation in selected schools and attendance at 
the East Tennessee Education Association or Georgia Teacher Education Associa- 
tion meeting and selected local professional meetings are considered a part of this 
course. 

166. CURRICULUM AND GENERAL METHODS, GRADES 7-12 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 

This course will include the secondary curriculum content — factors that influence 
change, the most important current practices, and critical curriculum issues facing 
educators today. It will provide general knowledge of current teaching methods, 
strategies of learning, and evaluation procedures. 

167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING, GRADES 7-12 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

The areas which offer Methods courses are: (A) Art, (B) Bible, (C) Business 
(Office Administration), (D) English, (E) Foreign Language, (F) Health and 
Physical Education, (G) History, (H) Home Economics (I) Industrial Arts, 
(J) Mathematics, (K) Music, (L) Science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics). 
Course Edu. 166 and Edu. 167 shall consist of a block and will be taken the same 
semester. 

The course will be offered the first half of that semester designated by the student's 
major department The class will meet four class periods per week. Among the 
student's responsibilities will be the collection and organization of a file of teach- 
ing materials, the preparation of lesson plans and evaluation of textbooks. 

171. STUDENT TEACHING, K-9 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, Psy. 112 and Edu. 163 A&B. 
This course is offered each semester and is available during the summer term to 
teachers with previous experience. The student will be assigned to one half-day 
in classroom observation and participation the first half of the semester, 

54 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The second half of the semester will be used for full-time student teaching in on- 
campus or selected off-campus elementary schools. Group conferences of two 
periods each week will be scheduled. A minimum of two hours credit must be 
earned in residence. 

Student teachers are expected to provide their own transportation to their teaching 
centers and to follow the school calendars where they are assigned. 

173. STUDENT TEACHING, GRADES 7-12 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, Psy. 112, Edu. 166 and Edu. 167. 
Music majors must have completed Music 181. 

This course is offered each semester and the summer session in selected areas. The 
student teachers will be assigned to the cooperating teacher at the beginning of 
the semester, and will be expected to spend a minimum of three hours per week 
in observation and participation. These hours will count toward the required 
student teaching allotment. One half semester of full time (a minimum of four 
class periods per day) of directed observation, participation and full-day class- 
room teaching is required in on-campus or selected off-campus secondary schools. 
Conferences of two class periods each week will be scheduled. 
A minimum of two hours credit must be earned in residence by degree candidates. 
Student teachers are expected to provide their own transportation to their teaching 
centers and to follow the school calendars where they are assigned. 

191. SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION 2 hours 

The first half of each semester double periods. A study of contemporary philo- 
sophical and sociological foundations of American Education. Consideration will be 
given to inner-city education. 

193. DIRECTED STUDY 1-2 hours 

This course permits the advanced student with adequate preparation to pursue 
independent study in special fields. 

197. WORKSHOP IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 2 hours 

Opportunity is provided for students to work under supervision on curriculum 
problems. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Sue Baker, Ann Clark, Bruce Gerhart, 
Minon Hamm, Wilma McClarty, Barbara Ruf 

Major: Thirty hours, excluding College Composition, including 
courses 85, 105, 110, 117, 118, 123, 124; one of the following: 41, 51, 
61, 65. Required cognate: History 151. 

Students anticipating secondary teaching should meet state certi- 
fication requirements (see Secondary Program under EDUCATION), 
take a minor in Fields Related to English Education, and obtain ex- 
perience working on the Southern Accent staff, Southern Memories 
staff, and/or a programs committee of one of the student organizations. 

Minor: Eighteen hours, excluding College Composition, including 
course 123; one of the following: 41, 51, 61, 65; one of the following: 
85, 124; and two of the following: 105, 110, 117, 118. 

Minor in Fields Related to English Education (Available only to 
English Majors): Eighteen hours including Library Science 53; History 

55 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

151, Speech 5, 64; Journalism 53; and five (two upper division) 
hours from the following electives: Psychology 115; Typing 13, 14. 
or 15; Education 140; any Communications course; any Library Science 
course. 

03. PROGRAMMED ENGLISH 

Students whose scores on English placement tests indicate a need for reinforcement 
in mechanics and structure are advised to register for this lab and College Compo- 
sition concurrently. Since this material is carefully programmed, the student, 
progressing at his own rate, may complete the course early in the semester by 
achieving scores of 85 percent or better in all units. This lab course will comprise 
two hours of the student's registered class load. 

1:2. COLLEGE COMPOSITION 6 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles of composition: syntax, sentence structure, 
paragraph development, organization of material. Emphasis on interpretive and 
evaluative reading and on expository and analytical writing. Admission to College 
Composition depends upon the student's satisfactory performance on the English 
placement tests. Students with low performance scores are advised to register for 
Programmed English 03 in conjunction with College Composition. This lab meets 
twice a week. 

41. LITERATURE AND LIFE 3 hours 

Prerequisite: College Composition 2 or 21. 

A thematic approach to the study and appreciation of literature, including the 
study of literary types and terms. 

51. SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 hours 

A study of representative selections from major American authors, colonial through 
modern, with emphasis on ideas, attitudes, and trends having individual, national 
and universal interest. 

61. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 3 hours 

A study of representative selections by British writers, with special emphasis on 
the author and his philosophy, and a review of literary trends and influences from 
ancient times to the present. 

65. MASTERPIECES OF LITERATURE 3 hours 

Prerequisite: College Composition 2 or 21 . 

A study and appreciation of selected English and American literary masterpieces 
in light of their biographical, historical, cultural, and literary settings. 

85. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: College Composition 2 or 21. 

Purposes to give the student a background in history of the English language; to 
acquaint him with the various fields, aspects, and branches of linguistics; to equip 
him with a working knowledge of structural linguistics' four principal branches — 
phonetics, phonemics, morphemics, and grammar; and to relate these learnings to 
the teaching of contemporary English. Open to sophomore and upper division 
students. This course is taught in alternate years. 

105. BIBLICAL AND WORLD LITERATURE 4 hours 

A study of major world masterpieces in translation, including Biblical poetry. 
This course is taught in alternate years. 

110. AMERICAN LITERATURE 4 hours 

A study of major and some minor American writers, as well as of literary trends 
and influences from the Colonial period to the present. This course is offered in 
alternate years. 

56 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

117. ENGLISH LITERATURE TO 1800 4 hours 
A study of medieval, Renaissance, and Neo-Classical writers and their works with 
special emphasis on Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, and Johnson. This course is 
offered in alternate years. 

118. ENGLISH LITERATURE: 1800 TO THE PRESENT 4 hours 
A study of the principal Romantic, Victorian, and Twentieth-century writers and 
their works. This course is offered in alternate years. 

123. CREATIVE WRITING 3 hours 
A study of the principles, techniques, and types of personalized writing, 
providing the student with opportunity to develop his own style and to find 
possible markets for his manuscripts that may be worthy of publication. 

124. ADVANCED GRAMMAR 3 hours 
A detailed survey of descriptive grammar as it pertains to parts of speech, 
sentence construction, syntax, and punctuation. Designed to aid any student 
who wishes to strengthen his skill in grammar analysis, it is also especially 
helpful for prospective teachers and writers. 

161. INDEPENDENT STUDY I or 2 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the 
individual student. Open only to English majors or minors with the approval of 
the department head. 

Edu.167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Nelson Thomas, Jackie Casebeer, Delmar Lovejoy, Donald Moon 

Major in Health, Physical Education and Recreation; Bachelor of 
Science; Thirty-six hours including courses 98:99, 160, 161, 175, and 176. 
Required cgnates: Chemistry 7, 8, or its equivalent. 

All general education requirements apply to students pursuing 
this program except the language requirement. All students must pass a 
proficiency test in four of five team activities, and four of the six indi- 
vidual activities. An acceptable level of proficiency will be required in 
the remaining activities. Students failing to demonstrate satisfactory per- 
formance will be required to make up deficiencies in the general activity 
classes. 

No more than four hours of activity courses may apply on the major. 

Intramural participation is recommended. 

Majors training for teaching positions must meet the secondary 
school state certification requirements set forth by the Education 
Department. 

Minor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation: Eighteen 
hours including 98:99 with a minimum of six hours of upper division. 

Students must pass a proficiency test in three of the five team 
activities and three of the six individual activities. An acceptable level of 
proficiency in the remaining team and individual activities will be re- 
quired. Students failing to demonstrate satisfactory performance will be 
required to make up deficiencies in the general activity classes. 

57 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

The physical education activity program is conducted to satisfy 
the need for recreation and physical exercise as a diversion from the 
sedentary classroom program. (During the freshman and sophomore 
years, students are required to take two hours of activity courses and 
two hours of Health and Life.) In subsequent years students are en- 
couraged to participate in the recreation program. 

Students enrolled in activity courses must wear regulation suits 
and shoes to all class appointments. Regulation gym wear for both 
men and women is available at the college store, Southern Mercantile. 
For full particulars, see your dormitory dean or the director of physical 
education. 

ACTIVITY COURSES 

11. SOCCER AND VOLLEYBALL I hour 

13. BASKETBALL AND SOFTBALL I hour 

52. ARCHERY AND RECREATIONAL GAMES I hour 

54. BADMINTON AND TENNIS I hour 

55. TRACK AND FIELD I hour 

56. GOLF I hour 

57. TUMBLING I hour 

58. ELEMENTARY APPARATUS I hour 

Basic skills emphasized on trampoline, P-bars, rings, unevens, and balance beam. 

59,60. TUMBLING TEAM 2 hours 

Admission to P.E. 59 or 60 will be based on satisfactory performance of try-out 
requirements for team membership. 

61. BEGINNING SWIMMING I hour 

For the novice, both beginning and intermediate swimming skills will be included. 

62. ADVANCED SWIMMING I hour 

A review of swimming strokes and conditioning. 



THEORY COURSES 



HEALTH 



22. SAFETY EDUCATION 2 hour$ 

The nature and causes of accidents, safety measures for the prevention of 
common accidents of the home, school, industry, transportation, and recreation. 
The standard and advanced Red Cross Certificates will be issued to those com- 
pleting the required work in first aid. 

53. HEALTH AND LIFE 2 hours 

A study of physiology, mental health, diet and health, and other subjects vital 
to healthful living, with special emphasis given to denominational health 
standards as revealed by Ellen G. White and by scientific research today. 

58 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION & RECREATION 

*153. HEALTH EDUCATION 2 hours 

A study of the theoretical and scientific basis of health education with emphasis 
on the development and organization of the school health instruction program. 
Taught in alternate years. 

160. KINESIOLOGY 4 hours 
A study of joints and muscular structure and their relation to physical exercise. 

161. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 7:8, or its equivalent. 

A nonlaboratory course emphasizing the physiological effects of muscular 
exercise, physical conditioning, and training. Significance of these effects for 
health and for performance in activity programs. 

*164. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 160. 

The study of treatment and prevention of athletic injuries. Taught in alternate 
years. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

35. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 3 hours 
A study into the aspect of physical education as a career, its relationship to 
related fields of education, general principles and philosophies, historical back- 
ground, and professional preparation. 

152. PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2 hours 

This course is designed primarily for elementary teachers and minors in 
Physical Education. Methods and materials, graded activities in games of low 
organization, team games, self-testing and rhythmic activities, and safety 
measures. Observation and teaching of elementary school children will be 
scheduled. 

Edu.167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING HEALTH & P.E. 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to Methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey arid evaluation of textbooks. 

*170. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 hours 

A study of the background of physical education. Taught in alternate years. 

175. AN INTRODUCTION TO MEASUREMENTS AND RESEARCH 

OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 hours 

A survey of tests used in Physical Education and an introduction to statistical 
procedures for assaying data and how it may be applied to research. 

176. PRINCIPLES AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION AND RECREATION 3 hours 

An integrated study of the principles and administrative concepts of Physical 
Education and Recreation. 

193. PROBLEMS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1-3 hours 

An introduction to research and discussion on problem areas in the discipline. 
Limited to Physical Education majors. 

RECREATION 

50. CAMP EDUCATION 2 hours 

A course designed to promote outdoor recreation and provide experience for those 

59 



HISTORY— POLITICAL SCIENCE 

who are interested in Pathfinder summer-camp work. A weekend campout is 
included as part of the course. 

63. WATER SAFETY I hour 

Prerequisites: P.E. 62 or equivalent. 

Leads to Red Cross Senior Life Saving certification. 
70. RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP 2 hours 

A study of recreation in American life; its philosophy, leadership, organization, 

and program. The emphasis of this course is to familiarize students with all 

aspects of recreation as they apply to contemporary life. 

98:99. OFFICIATING SPORTS ANALYSIS 4 hours 

An introduction to administration of and participation in organization of officiating 
in recreational activities. 

125. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR I hour 

Prerequisite: P. E. 63 or equivalent. 
Leads to Red Cross Instructor certification. 

HISTORY— POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Jerome Clark, Floyd Greenleaf, Floyd Murdoch 

Major; Thirty hours including courses 1, 2; 53, 54; 183; and 185. At 
least two courses are to be taken in each of the following areas as selected 
in counsel with a member of the History Department: 

Area I: American History 140, 145, 147, 148, 149, 154, Political 
Science 70, 116. 

Area II: European History 110, 112, 132, 151, 160, Political 
Science 162. 

Economics 71, 72 is to be taken as a cognate requirement. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including 1, 2; 53, 54 and six hours of 
upper biennium courses in History or Political Science to be chosen in 
counsel with a member of the History Department. Those wishing 
to certify for teaching History must take all eighteen hours in History. 

1,2. SURVEY OF CIVILIZATION 6 hours 

An introductory consideration of the ancient, classical and medieval contributions 
to our own civilization and a consideration of modern and current developments. 

51. CURRENT AFFAIRS 2 hours 

A course in current political developments of significance both domestic and 
international. Newspapers and current periodicals are used as materials. 

53, 54. AMERICAN HISTORY AND INSTITUTIONS 6 hours 

A study of the development of the character and civilization of the American 
people, including their politics, government, and social institutions reaching to 
the present time, 

110. MEDIEVAL EUROPE 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 or equivalent. 
European History from 500-1200 A.D. This course is taught in alternate years. 

60 



HISTORY — POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Ml 2. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, 2. 

An analysis of the revival of learning, from medieval to modern conditions, and 
of the causes, substance, and effects of the Reformation and Counter Reformation. 

*132. ANCIENT WORLD 3 hours 

A study of the nations of antiquity especially Israel, Assyria, Babylonia, Egypt, 
Medo-Persia and the classical nations Greece and Rome, concentrating on the 
institutions and contributions to civilization of each. 

*140. COLONIAL AMERICA 3 hours 

A study of American development from its origin to 1783 with particular em- 
phasis on constitutional, political, economic, and social trends. 

145. HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA 3 hours 

A survey of the colonial period, and a careful analysis of the political, economic, 
social, religious, and cultural development of the Latin-American Republics, and 
their present relation to world affairs. 

147. AGE OF REFORM 3 hours 

A study of the religious, social, cultural movements in the Early National and 
Jacksonian periods. 

148. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH 3 hours 
Prerequisite: History 53. 

A study of the Old South from the discovery through the war between the states, 
the reconstruction and the subsequent developments and recent changes, includ- 
ing the current scene. 

149. HISTORY OF AMERICAN MINORITIES 3 hours 
A study of American minorities with particular emphasis on their history, prob- 
lems, and relationship to American life. 

•111. ENGLISH HISTORY 3 hours 

An analysis of the political, social, economic, religious and cultural development 
of Great Britain and its contributions to the world, especially in constitutional 
and democratic institutions. 

154. MODERN AMERICA 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 54 

A study of American History from 1900 on with special examination of changes 
in American life brought about by the Progressive era, normalcy, the depression, 
the New Deal, and the role of the United States in world affairs. 

155,156. HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 6 hours 

A study of the development of the Christian Church from its apostolic origin to 
the present time with emphasis on the internal problems that eventually formed 
the background for present-day Christianity and its various divisions. 

160. MODERN EUROPE 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 2 

Historical developments in Europe from 1800 to the present, with emphasis on the 
movements which have directly shaped the contemporary world. 

183. RESEARCH METHODS IN HISTORY 3 hours 

Historical theories, procedures, and research methods are examined in conjunction 
with the preparation of a research project. To be taken by History majors in their 
junior year. 

61 



HOME ECONOMICS 

185. READINGS IN HISTORY 3 hours 

Selected readings in History, primarily dealing with the Non-Western world. 

Edit. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING HISTORY 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials in instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

191. PROBLEMS IN HISTORY I hour 

This course is for history majors only and consists of individual research work 
in some field of history. Content and method of study to be arranged. Approval 
must be secured from the department head prior to registration. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

70. AMERICAN NATIONAL AND STATE GOVERNMENT 3 hours 

An examination of the operation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches 
of government of the national, state, and local levels. To be taught in alternate 
years. 

*116. AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 53, 54. 

Significant developments in American Diplomatic History from the Revolution- 
ary Period to the present are examined with emphasis on trends since 1930. 

162. CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3 hours 

A critical analysis of the chief factors influencing present-day world affairs, with 
special emphasis on the ideological and religious background of current conflicts. 
This course is taught in alternate years. 

GEOGRAPHY 

41. WORLD GEOGRAPHY 3 hours 

Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are considered. 
Man's adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Thelma Cushman, Kenneth Burke, Ruth Higgins, Ellen Zollinger 

Major — Home Economics: Thirty hours for the Bachelor of Science 
degree in Home Economics including courses 1, 2, 8, 19, 22, 123, 126, 131, 
180, and 198. 

Interior Design Concentration: Thirty hours for the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Home Economics including courses 9, 10, 19, 109, 110, 
132, 198. Cognate requirement, Industrial Arts 101. A minor in art is 
required. 

Major — Foods and Nutrition: Thirty hours for the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree in Foods and Nutrition including courses 1, 2, 102, 126, 161, 
162, 171, 172, and 198. Business Administration 31 and 147, Psychology 
112, Biology 12 and 22, and Chemistry 7:8 and 172 to be taken as cognate 
requirements. Home Economics 130 and 131 and courses in Economics, 

62 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Psychology, and Education and Computer Science are recommended as 
electives. 

Those who plan to do graduate work in Home Economics should 
include Chemistry 11; Biology 12 and 22; and Economics 71, 72. 

Home Economics Majors Who Plan to Teach must include 8 hours 
from each of the following three groups: (1) foods and nutrition, (2) 
clothing and textiles, and (3) home management, home furnishings, and 
child development. 

The general education requirements for the above degree pro- 
grams are the same as those listed for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with the exceptions of foreign language study. 

Home Economics majors who wish to qualify for hospital dietetic 
internships approved by the American Dietetic Association must take 
the major in Foods and Nutrition. To qualify for American Dietetic 
Association membership in other areas of food and nutrition the stu- 
dent must meet the current specific requirements for A.D.A. member- 
ship. This should be arranged by the individual student in consultation 
with the instructor of Foods and Nutrition. 

Minor — Home Economics: Eighteen hours, six hours of which must 
be upper biennium. 

Minor — Foods and Nutrition: Eighteen hours including courses 1, 
2, 126, and six hours of upper biennium. 



FOODS AND NUTRITION 

1. FOODS 3 hours 

Basic principles of food composition, selection, and preparation. Two hours lec- 
ture and one laboratory period each week. 

2. NUTRITION 2-3 hours 

Principles of nutrition and their application to everyday living. Offered both 
semesters. Carries credit toward the general education requirement in science. 

50. FOOD PREPARATION I hour 

A course in food preparation for non-home economics students. Effort will be made 
to meet the specific needs of the group. One three-hour discussion and laboratory 
per week. 

102. EXPERIMENTAL FOODS 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 7:8 or 11 and HE 1. 

An experimental approach to preparation and development of standard recipes, 
and use of new food products. Two-hours lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods each week. This course is taught in alternate years. 

126. MEAL PLANNING 2-3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, or by approval of instructor. 
Menu planning, marketing, meal preparation, and table service. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory each week. 

63 



HOME ECONOMICS 

130. DEMONSTRATION TECHNIQUES 2 hours 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, or by approval of instructor. 

Designed to present purposes, standards, and techniques of demonstrations with 
application to teaching, business, and conducting cooking schools for adult groups. 
This course is taught in alternate years. 
*161. ADVANCED NUTRITION 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 126, and Chemistry 7:8 or 11. 
An indepth study of the principles of normal nutrition as they apply to individuals 
at different ages. 

*162. NUTRITION IN DISEASE (DIET THERAPY) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 7:8 or 11, and HE 1, 2, 126. 

A study of the principles of nutrition as applied to physiological conditions 
altered by stress, disease, or abnormalities. Two hours lecture and one labora- 
tory period each week. 

171. QUANTITY COOKERY 3 hours 
A study of quantity food, purchasing, production, and service with experience 
in the college cafeteria. Two one-hour lectures each week. Laboratory work by 
appointment in the various areas of food preparation. 

172. INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 3 hours 
A study of equipment selection, maintenance and layout, and management and 
personnel relationships in institution food service. Laboratory experience in col- 
lege and hospital food services. Two one-hour lectures each week. Laboratory by 
appointment. 

HOME MANAGEMENT 

8. MANAGEMENT AND ORIENTATION 3 hours 

A study of family problems and goals with emphasis on management of personal 
and family resources. Orientation in the areas of Home Economics and a study of 
the field in terms of history, philosophy and professional opportunities. Required 
of freshmen. 

61. SOCIAL ETHICS I hour 

Principles of Christian courtesy. Prepares for poised family, social and business 
relations. One and one-half hours a week. 

103. CONSUMER ECONOMICS 2 hours 

A basic course in consumer education from the standpoint of purchasing and 
money management a£ related to the home and its personal needs. 

*112. APPLIED HOME FURNISHINGS 3 hours 

Laboratory experience in simple upholstering and professional drapery making. 
Two 3-hour combined lecture and laboratory periods. 

131. UNDERSTANDING YOUNG CHILDREN 3 hours 
Prerequisites: Psychology 112 and Education 21. 

A study of the young child beginning with prenatal care through the years of 
infancy and early childhood with the family as a background for growth and 
development. The physical, mental, and social development are studied. Two 
class periods and two hours observation in nursery school and homes each week. 

180. PRACTICE IN HOME MANAGEMENT 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 126, 40, or approval of instructor. 
Experience in solving problems of family living, care of a home, budgeting, 
laundering, entertaining, planning, marketing, preparing and serving meals in 
the home management apartment for six weeks. One class period each week. 

64 



HOME ECONOMICS 

INTERIOR DESIGN 

9. INTERIOR DESIGN I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 101 or approval of instructor. 

The study of space relationships and requirements, the basic construction standards 
and practices, and the design approach for apartment living spaces. Two 3-hour 
combined lecture and laboratory periods each week. 

10, INTERIOR DESIGN II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Interior Design I. 

The study of the spatial and functional needs in small commercial spaces and an 
introduction to presentation and rendering techniques. Two 3-hour combined 
lecture and laboratory periods each week. 

109. INTERIOR DESIGN III 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Interior Design II. 

The study of spatial and functional needs in large commercial and specialized 
public spaces; application of presentation techniques in preparation of resume 
portfolios. Emphasis will be placed on space planning for public areas. Two 
3-hour combined lecture and laboratory periods each week. 

110. INTERIOR DESIGN IV 6 hours 
Prerequisites: Interior Design III, and Furniture and Interiors. Interior Design 
Professional practice (apprentice status). 

Drawing up detailed plans from conceptual sketches of the working designer; 
serve as residential design consultant; be involved in preliminary footwork of 
projects; . observe designer-client relationships; obtain a working knowledge of the 
business establishment's ethics, and procedures. 16-20 hours of laboratory a week; 
time to be arranged. 

113. WEAVING 3 hours 

Elementary weaving techniques and exercises to develop a working knowledge of 
the main parts of the loom, basic weaves, and different weaving materials. Crea- 
tive design with the use of pattern, color and texture. Two three-hour combined 
lecture and laboratory periods each week. 

123. INTERIOR ART 3 hours 

General survey of interior design and the relationship of art and design to every- 
day life in the home. 

132. FURNITURE AND INTERIORS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Art 146 or by approval of the Instructor. 

Study of furnishings, interiors, and designers, past and present. Evaluation of the 
economical, social and technical influences on the evolution of design and the 
inter-relationship of architectural and furniture styles. 



TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

19. TEXTILES 2 hours 

A study of basic fibers and weaves including properties, construction, selection, 
uses, and care of textile fabrics. Two one-hour lectures per week. 

22. CLOTHING CONCEPTS 4 hours 

Basic values related to clothing problems, including a study of aesthetics, fabrics, 
consumer economics, fitting and construction principles. Two one-hour lectures 
and one three-hour lab per week. Offered both semesters. 

65 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

119. ADVANCED TEXTILES 2 hours 

An in depth study of fabrics, their properties and characteristics. Testing and 
identifying quality and construction for various uses to meet the needs of the 
consumer. 

122. CLOTHING DESIGN 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 22 or by approval of instructor. 
Clothing design and practice in creating designs through fiat pattern and draping 
techniques. Two one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. 

*164. CREATIVE CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 22. 

Creative clothing construction with emphasis on creation of original design and 
manipulation of fabrics applied to tailored garments. Two one-hour class periods 
and two labs per week. 

191. INDEPENDENT STUDY I or 2 hours 

To permit the advanced student majoring in Home Economics to do individual 
work in the field under the direction of a staff member. Students minoring in 
Home Economics are limited to one hour. 

198. SEMINAR 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Twenty hours completed in Home Economics. 

Recent trends in Home Economics and related professional fields. Required of and 
limited to majors. 

Edu.167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
Drew Turlington, Wayne Janzen, John Durichek, Robert Warner 

Major — Industrial Arts: Forty hours for the Bachelor of Science 
degree including courses 1; 8; 11; 15; 25; 51; 54; 190; 192. Cognate 
requirements: Math 5, Physics 1 or 51, Chemistry 5, 7 or 11. A 
minimum of eight semester hours is required in each area in which the 
student plans to teach. 

While industrial arts courses provide the students with consumer 
knowledge of the various materials of industry, and give him exploratory 
experiences in the various trades, they do not propose to teach a trade. 
However, many of the course offerings are taught as trade courses for 
those students planning to go into plant maintenance and industry. 
Each student, on leaving college, should be proficient in at least one trade, 
no matter what his profession. 

Students planning to teach are required to take courses 124, 196, 
198, along with a minimum of 20 semester hours of professional educa- 
tion for denominational certification. Additional hours may be required 
for state certification depending upon the state in which the student plans 
to teach. 

The general education requirements are the same as those for a 
Bachelor of Arts degree with the exception of the foreign language 
requirement. 

66 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Minor: Eighteen hours including six hours upper biennium. It is 
recommended that the student divide the hours between two of the 
following areas: Drafting, Woods, Metals, and Mechanics. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY 

Two- Year Curriculum in Industrial Education: Sixty-four hours are 
required for the associate of science degree in Industrial Education includ- 
ing Industrial Education 5, 6, 36:37, 46, 50, 60, 99, 100, and 101; 
English 1; six hours of Religion; three hours of Social Science; two 
hours of Communications; and electives sufficient to make a two-year 
total of 64 semester hours. 

I. TECHNICAL DRAWING 4 hours 

A basic course in drafting, training the student in the use of instruments and the 
principles of orthographic projection, surface development, sectioning, pictorial 
drawings, and dimensioned working drawings. Eight hours laboratory each week. 
Lecture as announced by the instructor. 

3. AUTOMOTIVE SURVEY FOR WOMEN 2 hours 

A course designed to help women become knowledgeable in the maintenance 
and operation of an automobile. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory 
each week. 

5. MASONRY 3 hours 

A fundamental course in concrete, concrete block and brick laying. One hour 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory each week. 

6. PLUMBING 2 hours 

Code requirements of, and procedures in residential plumbing. One hour lecture, 
3 hours laboratory each week. 

8. PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS 3 hours 

A basic course in the principles of electricity and electronic Circuitry — D. C. and 
A. C, with emphasis on resistors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, vacuum tubes, 
amplifiers, and oscillators. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

II. WOODWORKING 4 hours 
A study of hand and machine tools, joinery, and proper methods of furniture con- 
struction. Two hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory each week. 

12. WOODTURNING 1-2 hours 

Center and faceplate turning experiences. Three hours laboratory for each 
semester hour credit. 

15. GENERAL METALS 4 hours 

Designed to acquaint the student with the many aspects of the metal working 
industry. Instruction will be given in the areas of forging, foundry, heat treat- 
ment, sheet metal, welding, plus hand and power operated metal cutting equip- 
ment. Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory each week. 

20. REFRIGERATION & AIR CONDITIONING 2 hours 

Fundamental principles of refrigeration and air conditioning. Emphasis will be 
placed on trouble shooting and servicing of equipment. One hour lecture and 
three hours laboratory each week. 

67 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

25. GRAPHIC ARTS 3 hours 

A comprehensive "overview" of graphic communications. Covers all occupations 
and functions in the average printing organization plus kinds of materials and 
creative services. All types of printed products are analyzed from creation to 
finish. 

36:37. CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 8 hours 

Instruction and practices in the procedures involved in the construction of a resi- 
dence. Two hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory each week. 

42. ELECTRIC AND OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING 4 hours 

A very practical course in arc and acetylene welding, teaching the student to 
weld skillfully in all positions: flat, vertical, and overhead. Two hours lecture 
and six hours laboratory each week. 

46. CABINET MAKING 4 hours 

Design, layout, and construction of all types of cabinets: kitchen, built-ins, etc. 
Two hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory each week. 

50. HOUSE WIRING 3 hours 

Instruction in the National Electric Code, basic electrical principles, complete 
instruction and practice in residential wiring, including electric heating. Some 
industrial wiring techniques will also be included. One hour lecture, six hours 
laboratory each week. 

51. AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS 4 hours 

A course designed to give basic understanding of the automobile. Main emphasis 
is given to power plant and drive train design, operation and service. Two hours 
lecture and six hours laboratory each week. 

54. INDUSTRIAL CRAFTS 2 hours 

Exploring the technology of industry by forming and fabricating objects of 
plastics, metals, and woods. One hour lecture and three hours lab each week. Open 
to all students. 

60. INDUSTRIAL SAFETY EDUCATION 2 hours 

A study of safety precautions necessary in all types of industrial and construction 
situations. Two hours lecture each week. 

99. PRACTICUM I 6 hours 

Internship for students registered in the associate degree in the building tech- 
nology. 

100. PRACTICUM II 6 hours 
Internship for students registered in the associate degree in the building tech- 
nology. 

101. ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 4 hours 
A study of architectural details and methods of construction relative to frame 
and masonry veneer residential dwellings. Emphasis is placed on residential 
planning and design principles. Each student will design and draw all details 
necessary in the construction of a home. Eight hours laboratory each week. 
Lectures as announced by the instructor. 

121. ENGINE REBUILDING 2 hours 

This course is designed to provide experience in internal combustion engine over- 
haul. Each student will individually remove from car, overhaul and re-install 
one engine. 

124. INDUSTRIAL ARTS DESIGN 2 hours 

Open only to Industrial Arts majors and minors. A study of the fundamental 
principles of structural and decorative design, with emphasis on the application 

68 



MATHEMATICS 

of design in various materials and processes in the Industrial Arts field, using 
problem solving sketching, details, and working drawings in the development of 
the design. Two one-hour lectures each week. This course is to be taught in 
alternate years. 

125. LITHO PREP & PRESS 2 hours 

This is a "hands-on" approach to the lithographic offset process. The laboratory 
will give the student actual operating experience with process cameras, dark room 
techniques, stripping, plate making, contacting, and a variety of offset press 
equipment. 

144. MACHINE SHOP 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Education 15. 

Instruction in the metal casting process and the methods and machines used in 
the metalworking industry. Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory each week. 

153. AUTOMOTIVE TUNEUP 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Education 51. 

Automotive trouble shooting and tune-up. Course emphasis directed towards the 
automobile electrical and fuel system. One hour lecture and three hours labora- 
tory each week. 

190. MACHINE AND TOOL MAINTENANCE 2 hours 

A study of the principles and methods of machine repair and preventative main- 
tenance of equipment found in an industrial laboratory. The time will be divided 
between metalworking and woodworking equipment. One hour lecture and three 
hours laboratory each week. 

192. AMERICAN INDUSTRY 2 hours 

A study of the various industries in this technological age, emphasizing the 

materials and processes. Field trips will be scheduled to visit industries in the 

surrounding areas. Two hours lecture each week. 

196. SHOP ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 2 hours 

While this course deals with both the general shop and the unit shop, emphasis 
will be on the comprehensive general shop. Laboratories will be scheduled as 
required. This course is to be taught in alternate years. 

198. SEMINAR I hour 
A discussion of problems related to the industrial education teaching profession. 
One hour discussion each week. 

199. INDUSTRIAL ARTS PROBLEMS 1-2 hours 
The study of a particular problem in the field of Industrial Arts. A written 
report of the problem may be required by the supervising instructor. Offered on 
demand. 

Edu.167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING INDUSTRIAL ARTS 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

MATHEMATICS 

Lawrence Hanson, Cecil Davis, Arthur Richert 

Major: Thirty hours including courses 91, 121, 151, and 152. Com- 
puter Science 44, 45, and 46 are cognate requirements. Students who 
plan to continue the study of mathematics at the graduate level should 
include courses 122 and 146 in their programs. Prospective secondary 

69 



MATHEMATICS 

teachers should include courses 76, 82, and 136. French or German is 
recommended as the foreign language. 

Minor; Eighteen hours including courses 51 and 52 or their equiva- 
lent plus at least six hours of upper biennium courses. 

0. BASIC MATHEMATICS No Credit 

A noncredit, reduced tuition course taught by advanced mathematics students 
which covers arithmetic and beginning algebra for those having weak backgrounds 
in mathematics. Meets three times per week. 

1. MODERN CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS 3 hours 

Prerequisites: One unit of secondary algebra and one of geometry. 
Set theory as related to elementary mathematics; numeration systems; number 
systems and their properties, including the whole numbers, the integers, the 
rational numbers, and the real numbers; basic concepts of geometry. Does not 
apply on a major or minor in mathematics. 

5. COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3 hours 

Prerequisite: One unit of high school algebra and one of geometry. 
Elementary set theory; number systems and their properties; exponents and 
radicals; equations and inequalities; elementary (except trigonometric) functions 
and their graphs; systems of equations. Does not apply on a major or minor in 
mathematics. 

7. TRIGONOMETRY I hour 

Prerequisites: Two units of high school algebra and one of geometry, or one unit 
of high school algebra, one of geometry and Mathematics 5. 

The definitions, properties, and graphs of the trigonometric functions. This course 
is designed to be taken concurrently with Mathematics 51 by those who have had 
little or no trigonometry at the secondary level. Does not apply on a major in 
mathematics. 

36. FINITE MATHEMATICS 3 hours 

Prerequisites: One unit of high school algebra and one of geometry. 
Topics to be selected from among the following; introductory concepts in set 
theory and logic, elementary combinatorial analysis, probability, vectors and 
matrices, game theory, linear programming, graph theory, mathematics of finance. 

51:52. CALCULUS I, II 8 hours 

Prerequisites: Two units of high school algebra and one of geometry, or one unit 
of high school algebra, one of geometry and Mathematics 5. Those who have not 
had Mathematics 5 must pass a placement examination covering second year high 
school algebra. 

Corequisite: Those who do not pass the placement examination covering the 
fundamentals of trigonometry must enroll in Mathematics 7 concurrently with 
Mathematics 51. 

Differential and integral calculus of the elementary functions and relations, in- 
cluding the derivative, computation of derivatives, the integral, the fundamental 
theorem of calculus, techniques of integration, applications of derivatives and in- 
tegrals, infinite series, elementary differential geometry. 

76. SET THEORY AND LOGIC 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 52, or Mathematics 5 and permission of instructor. 
An introduction to some of the basic ideas, terminology, and notation of logic and 
sets. The concept of a mathematical proof will be emphasized. 

70 



MATHEMATICS 

82. STATISTICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or Mathematics 5 or 36, 
Elementary probability, organization and analysis of data, the binomial, normal, 
Student's t, and chi-square distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing, nonpara- 
metric statistics, regression and correlation. 

91. CALCULUS III 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 52. 

Multivariate calculus, including the geometry of space, limits and continuity of 
functions of several variables, partial and directional derivatives and their appli- 
cations, multiple integrals and their applications; elementary differential equations. 

111. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 91 . 

Classification and solution of common types of ordinary differential equations. 

Applications to problems arising in the physical sciences. 

112. TOPICS OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 111. 

Partial differential equations, Fourier series, boundary value problems, Bessel 
functions, Legendre polynomials. Taught only upon sufficient demand. 

*121:122. ADVANCED CALCULUS 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 91. Mathematics 76 recommended, 

Introduction to point set topology, continuity, uniform continuity, properties of 
derivatives and integrals, convergence, uniform convergence, sequences of func- 
tions, and infinite series. This course is taught in alternate years. 

136. GEOMETRY 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 52. Mathematics 76 recommended. 
Advanced study of the basic concepts of Euclidian geometry, including the in- 
cidence and separation properties of planes and space, measurement functions, 
congruence from both the metric and synthetic approach, geometric inequalities, 
the parallel postulate, area theory, constructions with ruler and compass; intro- 
duction to Riemannian and hyperbolic geometry and their models. This course 
is taught in alternate years. 

*142. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 91 

Probability as a mathematical system, random variables and their distributions, 
topics in statistical inference including sampling, estimation of parameters, 
hypothesis-testing, regression. This course is taught in alternate years. 

146. COMPLEX VARIABLES 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 91. Mathematics 76 recommended. 

An introduction to the theory of analytic functions of a complex variable, includ- 
ing mappings by elementary functions, complex integration, the Cauchy-Goursat 
theorem, Cauchy's integral formula, power series, Laurent series, the theory of 
residues, and conformal mapping. Taught in alternate years. 

151. ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 52. Mathematics 76 recommended. 

The structure of groups, rings, integral domains and fields. This course is taught 
in alternate years. 

152. LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 52. Mathematics 76 recommended. 

Finite dimensional vector spaces over a field and the attendant concepts of 
systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants. This course is taught in 
alternate years. 

n 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

191. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval by department chairman. 

Individual reading and problem solving in a field chosen in consultation with an 
instructor. 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of intsruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 
Robert Morrison, Rudolf Aussner, Helmut Ott 

Southern Missionary College makes available to its students a 
well-rounded program in language instruction through the media of the 
classroom, the language laboratory, and extension school studies. A 
modern language laboratory provides the student with a realistic ap- 
proach to gaining skill in the language of his choice while on the cam- 
pus of Southern Missionary College. 

Major — German or Spanish: Thirty hours excluding course 1:2, but 
including course 93:94. 

Minor — German, Spanish, or French: Eighteen hours excluding 
course 1:2, but including course 93:94 and six hours of upper-biennium 
courses. 

GERMAN 
1:2. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 8 hours 

A foundation course in the basic skills. May be waived by examination. Labor- 
atory work is required. No credit will be allowed for elementary modern language 
if credit has already been received for it at the secondary level 

93:94. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Entrance by standardized examination at required level. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult prose 
and poetry; oral and written exercises. Laboratory work is required. The second 
semester, if enrollment permits, there will be two sections: a. Literary Program, 
b. Science Readings. 

117. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: German 93:94 or equivalent. 

An intensive course aiming at proficiency in understanding and speaking, at a 
practical knowledge of stylistics, and at ability in free composition. (Not open to 
German-speaking nationals.) 

120. GERMAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION 3 hours 

The literary, artistic, intellectual, social, religious, economic, and political scene 
of present-day Germany, with a study of its development from the recent past. 

123,124. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE 6 hours 

A prerequisite for all subsequent literature courses; history and development of 
German literature; reading of representative works. This course is offered in 
alternate years. 

132. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT 2 hours 

Foreign (French) and philosophical background of the period, changing altitudes 
in life and literature. Anacreontic poets. Young Goethe, Wieland, and Lessing. 
This course is offered in alternate years. 

72 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

*134. GERMAN ROMANTICISM 2 hours 

The poetry and prose of outstanding writers of this period, from Holderlin to 
Heine. This course is offered in alternate years. 

137. THE GERMAN LANGUAGE 2 hours 

Prerequisite: German 93:94. Recommended: German 117. 
Introduction to the history and development of the German language. This course 
is offered in alternate years. 

*161. CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LITERATURE 2 hours 

A course dealing with the different literary schools and periods from Nat- 
uralism to the Aftermath of World War II (Naturalism, Impressionism, and 
the related trends of Neoromanticism and Neoclassicism, Expressionism, and 
the Neo Matter-of-Factness, Literature and National Socialism (1933-1945), 
Aftermath of World War II). This course is offered in alternate years. 

*U2. GERMAN CLASSICISM 2 hours 

A course offering a comparison of Goethe and Schiller, Goethe's Classical Period 
(1787-1805), Schiller's Classical Period (1787-1805), and Goethe's Old Age (1805- 
1832). This course is offered in alternate years. 

*164. GERMAN SHORT STORIES 2 hours 

A course giving the student a survey of German short stories from Goethe's death 
(Romanticism) to the present. This course is offered in alternate years. 

197. DIRECTED READINGS IN GERMAN LITERATURE 4-6 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the 
individual student. Open only to German majors, or minors with the approval 
of the department head. 

SPANISH 
1:2. BEGINNING SPANISH 8 hours 

A foundation course in the basic skills. May be waived by examination. Lab- 
oratory work is required. No credit will be allowed for elementary modern 
language if credit has already been received for it at the secondary level. 

93:94. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Entrance by standardized examination at a required level. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 
Spanish texts; oral and written exercises. At the discretion of the department, this 
course may be closed to Spanish-speaking persons with three credits in Secondary- 
Spanish. Laboratory work is required. 

117. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93:94 or equivalent. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding, and writing idiomatic Spanish. 
(Not open to Spanish or Latin- American nationals.) 

*120. HISPANIC CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93:94 or equivalent. 

The social, religious, political, economic, artistic, and intellectual scene in the 
Spanish-speaking world. 

123,124. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93:94 or equivalent. 

History and development of Spanish literature; reading of representative works. 
This course is offered in alternate years. 

127. SPANISH LINGUISTICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93:94 or equivalent. Recommended: Spanish 117. 
Introduction to the morphological, syntactic and phonemic structure of the Spanish 

73 



MUSIC 

language. Practice in sounds, intonation, and transcription; remedial pronuncia- 
tion drills. This course is offered in alternate years. 

*133,134. SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93:94 or equivalent. 

History and development of Spanish-American literature; reading of representative 
works. This course is offered in alternate years. 

*145. THE GOLDEN AGE OF SPANISH LITERATURE 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93:94 or equivalent. 

A study of the Classical Period of Spanish literature. This course is offered in 
alternate years. 

197. DIRECTED READINGS IN SPANISH LITERATURE 4-6 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the 
individual student. Open only to Spanish majors, or minors with the approval 
of the department head. 

FRENCH 
1:2. BEGINNING FRENCH 8 hours 

A foundation course in the basic skills. May be waived by examination. Labora- 
tory work is required. No credit will be granted for elementary modern language 
if credit has already 'been received for it at the secondary level. 

93:94. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Entrance by standardized examination at required level. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult prose 
and poetry; oral and written exercises. Laboratory work is required. 

117. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: French 93:94 or equivalent. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding and writing idiomatic French, 
120. FRENCH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: French 93:94 or equivalent. 

The literary, artistic, intellectual, social, religious, economic and political scene of 

present-day France, with a study of its development from the recent past. 

123,124. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE 6 hours 

Prerequisite: French 93:94 or equivalent. 

History and development of French literature; reading of representative works. 
This course is offered in alternate years. 

127. FRENCH LINGUISTICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: French 93:94 or equivalent. 

Introduction to the morphological, syntactic and phonemic structure of the French 
language. Practice in sounds, intonation, and transcription; remedial pronuncia- 
tion drills. 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING MODERN LANGUAGES 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction; planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances; the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

MUSIC 

Marvin L. Robertson, Dorothy Ackerman, Bruce Ashton, Orlo Gilbert, 
John McClarty, James McGee, Don Runyan, Stanley Walker 



74 



MUSIC 

The Department of Music offers two degrees; the Bachelor of 
Music degree in music education and the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
music. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: 

Music majors must fulfill all the general admission requirements 
of the college. In addition a prospective music major is required to 
take written and aural entrance examinations in music theory and a 
performance examination in the applied concentration. To obtain 
Freshman standing as a music major the student must qualify for 
Music Theory 45 and Applied Music 51. 

Further information regarding the entrance examinations may be 
obtained by writing the chairman of the music department. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: 

Functional Piano: All music majors must pass an examination in 
functional piano which includes the playing of hymns, scales, triads, ar- 
peggios, several moderately easy compositions and accompaniments, and 
the harmonization of simple folk melodies. The functional piano 
examination should be passed during the first week of the first semester 
in residence or the student must register for applied piano instruction. 
Applied music courses 9 and 109 are designed to help the student 
reach the required level of proficiency. 

Applied Music Credit: One semester hour of credit will be allowed 
for 14 half-hour lessons with a minimum of five hours of practice 
per lesson. Applied music grades are assigned by a jury examination 
at the end of each semester. 

Concert and Recital Attendance: A music major must attend 12 
approved concerts per semester. Failure to meet this requirement will 
lower the student's applied music grade and possibly result in probation- 
ary status as a music major. 

Music Ensemble Participation: All music majors are required to 
participate in a music ensemble every semester in full-time residence. 

Senior Recital: The candidate for the Bachelor of Music degree 
or the Bachelor of Arts degree will present a senior recital. Upon music 
faculty approval the senior recital requirement may be partially fulfilled 
through a conducting or chamber music performance. 

A faculty audition of the complete program must be scheduled at 
least four weeks before the recital date. Unsatisfactory performance at 
this audition will result in a rescheduling of the recital date. 

JUNIOR STANDING: 

Music majors must apply for Junior standing at the end of the 
sophomore year. The requirements for Junior standing are as follows: 

a. An overall grade point average of 2.0. 

b. A grade point average of 2.5 in all music courses. 

75 



MUSIC 

c. Completion of the functional piano requirement. 

d. Completion of Music Theory 45:46, 47:48. 

e. Completion of four hours of Applied Music 51 or equivalent. 

Faculty evaluation of the application for Junior standing will 
result in the student receiving one of the following classifications: 
a. Pass, Bachelor of Music; b. Pass, Bachelor of Arts; c. Probation; d. 
Fail, Junior standing requirements must be met at least two semesters 
before graduation. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC CURRICULUM: 

The Bachelor of Music degree in music education prepares the 
student to meet basic state and denominational certification require- 
ments. Each student will be responsible to determine the additional 
courses that may be required for certification in the state of his choice. 
This information can be obtained at the Office of Admissions and 
Records or the Department of Education 

Students who desire State of Tennessee certification must take 
four additional hours of professional education. 

The following general education requirements apply only to stu- 
dents pursuing a Bachelor of Music degree: 

Humanities 4 hours 

Health & Physical Education (including 53 and 

2 hours of activities courses) 4 hours 

Language Arts: English 1:2; Speech, 

or Literature elective 8 hours 

Religion: Including two of the three following: 

10, 50, and 105 12 hours 

Science and Math: Including 6 hours of lab science 9 hours 

Social Science, including History 1, 2 & Sociology 82 .... 10 hours 

Bachelor of Music in Music Education Degree Requirements: 

Music Theory: including 45:46; 47:48; 95:96; 97:98 .... 19 hours 
(instrumental emphasis must take 141) 

Music Ensemble 8 hours 

Music History 125:126 8 hours 

Conducting: 181 4 hours 

Music Education: 136 2 hours 

Additional Requirements for the Music Education Degree: 

(Choral Emphasis) 

Applied Music Concentration (piano, organ, or voice) .. 12 hours 

Applied Music Secondary (selected in consultation 

with advisor) 4 hours 

76 



MUSIC 

Music Education: including pedagogy in the applied 
concentration and two of the following: 33, 34, 35. 
(Voice majors must include 33) 6 hours 

Education 21, 166, 167, 173, 191 and Psy. 112 18 hours 

Additional Requirements for the Music Education Degree: 
(Instrumental Emphasis) 

Applied Music concentration (brass, woodwinds, 

strings, piano or organ) 12 hours 

Applied Music Secondary selected in consultation with 
advisor. Preparation to meet deficiencies in the 
functional piano requirement may not be applied 
to the Applied Music Secondary 4 hours 

Material and Techniques 34, 35 (Piano and organ 

majors must also take the Pedagogy course in the 

Applied Music Concentration) 4-6 hours 

Education: including 21, 166, 167, 173, 191 and 

Psy. 112 18-20 hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS CURRICULUM: 

The Bachelor of Arts in music is a non-professional degree designed 
to give the student a broad understanding of the musical heritage of man. 
This degree consists of 40 hours including 14 upper biennium. Courses 
must include the following: 

Music Theory including 45: 46; 47:48; 95:96; 97:98 .... 19 hours 

Music History including 125:126 8 hours 

Applied Music Concentration 51 and 151 8 hours 

Ensembles 5 hours 

A student must complete all general education requirements of 
the college. 

The foreign language required is either French or German. Through 
careful planning a student may fulfill state certification requirements 
within four years. 

MUSIC MINOR 

Music Minor: Eighteen hours including the following: 

Music Theory 45:46 6 hours 

Music History 125:126 8 hours 

Applied Music Concentration 51 4 hours 

Applied Music grades are assigned by a jury examination at the 
end of each semester. 



77 



MUSIC 



MUSIC THEORY 



2. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY 2 hours 

A study of the rudiments and basic vocabulary of music theory. Does not apply 
toward a music major or minor. 

45:46. MATERIALS AND ORGANIZATION OF MUSIC I AND II 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 2 or examination. 

A study of the elements which render music of all periods aurally and visually 
comprehensible, within simple forms and a variety of textures from one to four 
voices. 

47:48. APPLIED KEYBOARD AND MUSIC READING SKILLS, I AND II 2 hours 

Keyboard and sight-singing applications of the materials introduced in Music 
45-46. (Music majors must take this concurrently with Music 45:46.) 

95:96. MATERIALS AND ORGANIZATION OF MUSIC III AND IV 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45:46. 

An expanded and intensified study of the structure of music as begun in Music 

45:46. In Music 96, contemporary music is emphasized. 

97:98 APPLIED KEYBOARD AND MUSIC READING SKILLS. Ill AND IV 2 hours 

Keyboard and sight-singing applications of materials studied in Music 95:96. 
Music majors must take this concurrently with Music 95:96. 

141. ORCHESTRATION AND ARRANGING 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45:46. 

The ranges, capabilities and limitations, transpositions of orchestra and band 
instruments. Idiomatic scoring of short works for vocal and instrumental chamber 
groups, small orchestra and band. Performance of exercises and analysis of scores 
is emphasized. 

177. ANALYSIS OF MUSIC FORM 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 95:96, or permission of instructor. 

An analytical study of musical structure from the smallest units of form to the 
more complex music of all historical periods. 

MUSIC HISTORY 

125:126. HISTORY OF MUSIC 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45:46 or permission of instructor. 

A study of music literature from antiquity to the present, cultural backgrounds, 
development of music form and style, analysis of representative masterworks 
from each major period of music history. Two listening periods per week are 
required. 

CHURCH MUSIC 

65. MINISTRY OF MUSIC 3 hours 

A study of the rudiments of music, methods of conducting congregational singing, 
and principles and standards of music for the church. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

33. SINGERS DICTION 2 hours 

A study of the correct pronunciation of Italian, German, French, and English. 



78 



MUSIC 

34. STRING MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES 2 hours 
A study of the stringed instruments in class and a survey of teaching materials 
for class and private instruction. 

35. WIND MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES 2 hours 

A study of tone production, embouchure, fingerings, practical pedagogic technique 
and simple repairs. A survey of the literature for the instruments and evaluation 
of teaching methods. 

130. PIANO PEDAGOGY 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Music 52r or equivalent. 

Methods, materials and procedures for private and class piano instruction; 
planning a complete program for pupils on various grade levels including 
technic, repertoire and musicianship. 

131. ORGAN PEDAGOGY 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 52r or equivalent. 

Methods, materials and procedures for instruction in organ; accompaniment of 
church services; registration of organ literature on various types of organs. 

132. VOICE PEDAGOGY 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Music 52r or equivalent. 

Methods, materials and procedures for private and class voice instruction; test- 
ing and classification of voices; physiological and psychological problems of 
voice production and diction. 

136. SUPERVISION OF SCHOOL MUSIC 2 hours 

A study of the basic philosophies, methods, and materials related to the teaching 
of music in the elementary school. Observation of and participation in the cam- 
pus school music program is required of all students. Open to music majors, 
minors, or by permission of the instructor. 

Edu.167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING MUSIC 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to Methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 



APPLIED MUSIC 

f5.6. GROUP INSTRUCTION 2 hours 

Group instruction in voice, piano, or orchestral instruments. This course is de- 
signed for the beginning student. See financial section for reduced fee information. 

9. SECONDARY 1-4 hours 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument 

109. SECONDARY 1-2 hours 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

51. CONCENTRATION 1-4 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for Freshman standing. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

79 



MUSIC 

151. CONCENTRATION 1-8 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 51 for four hours or equivalent. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

181. CONDUCTING TECHNIQUES 4 hours 

This course is designed to give the music student the requisite skills for conducting 
choral and instrumental groups. 

fCourses 5, 6; 9, and 109 are open to any student of the college as 
elective credit toward the B.A. or B.S. degree. The music major or 
minor may not apply these toward his applied music concentration. Stu- 
dents desiring to study organ must pass the Functional Piano Examina- 
tion. 

Courses 51 and 151 are courses primarily for the music major and 
minor, but they may be elected by anyone who passes the examination 
for freshman standing. Jury examinations are required with these course 
numbers. 

The following performance areas may be studied: voice, piano, 
organ, violin, viola, cello, double bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, 
bassoon, trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone, tuba, and percussion 
instruments. 

MUSIC ENSEMBLES 

Music ensembles are open to all college students through audition. 
Each music ensemble meets three periods per week and offers one hour 
credit each semester; regular attendance at rehearsals is required. Col- 
legiate Chorale rehearses two periods per week as a separate organization 
and one period per week with the College Choir. A student may not 
enroll concurrently in Concert Band and Collegiate Chorale. 

Course numbers 55 and 155 do not fulfill the music ensemble par- 
ticipation requirement for music majors except those taking a keyboard 
concentration. Music majors other than those taking a keyboard con- 
centration, who wish Instrumental Ensemble credit must be registered 
concurrently in Concert Band or Orchestra. 

Ensembles on campus are organized and sponsored by members 
of the music staff. 

11,111. CONCERT BAND 1-4 hours each 

13,113. ORCHESTRA 1-4 hours each 

15,115. COLLEGE CHOIR 1-4 hours each 

17,117. MALE CHORUS 1-4 hours each 

19,119. COLLEGIATE CHORALE 1-4 hours each 

55,155. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE 1-4 hours each 



80 



NURSING 
BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM OF NURSING 

Chairman: Carl Miller 

Faculty — Geneva Bowman, Zerita Hagerman, Kathy Hinson, Theresa 
Kennedy, Miriam Kerr, Jackie Kinsman, Christine Rummer, 
Doris Payne, Christine Perkins, Lana Roberts, Shirley Spears, 
Vivian Snyder, Joyce Thornton, Judy Winters. 

The baccalaureate nursing curriculum is designed for individuals 
who desire to obtain the basic preparation needed to pursue a professional 
career in any of the various settings where contemporary nursing is 
practiced. In a diversity of clinical situations, students are provided the 
opportunity to develop knowledge and skill in assessing patient needs, 
in planning a course of action based on scientific principles and in lead- 
ing out in the implementation of the plan designed for nursing inter- 
vention. Throughout the curriculum, focus is upon the patient as a 
member of a family and upon total family health within the community. 

The program may be completed in four academic years. Residency 
is on the Collegedale campus except for the junior year, which is spent 
on the extension campus located in Orlando, Florida. Upon completion 
of all academic requirements, the graduate will receive a bachelor of 
science degree with a major in nursing and will be eligible to write 
qualifying examinations for state licensure. 

ACCREDITATION 

The baccalaureate degree program in nursing is fully accredited 
by the Board of Review for Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs 
of the National League for Nursing; is approved by the National League 
for Nursing to admit registered nurse stuaents to the curriculum; is reg- 
istered with the Board of Regents of the Department of Education of the 
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists; and is approved by the 
Tennessee Board of Nursing. 

REGISTERED NURSE STUDENTS 

Due to the diversity in educational backgrounds of nurses, it is 
necessary to consider each student individually with regard to his needs 
and required courses. The following general policies will apply: 

Students: 

1 . must hold a current license to practice nursing. 

2. may be required to take national standardized examinations be- 
fore matriculating in nursing courses. 

3. may take comprehensive challenging examinations in nursing 
to validate credit (see page 15). The Department reserves the 

81 



NURSING 

right to limit the amount of nursing credit received by validation 
examination. 

4. must complete all validating exams and Course 115 prior to 
matriculating for any other nursing courses. 

5. must complete all or be currently enrolled in remainder of re- 
quired cognate courses before permission will be granted to 
enroll in 166:167 and 180. 

6. must repeat natural and behavioral science courses when past 
credit is no more recent than 12 years. 

CURRICULUM 

Major: Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Fifty-six hours including 
all courses listed in the bulletin except 192. 

Academy, or high school phvsics (minimum grade of "C") is re- 
quired. If a student is deficient in this area, Physics I may be taken 
concurrently with other lower division courses. 

Students are expected at specified intervals during their academic 
program to take nationally accepted standardized exams. These exams 
aid in establishing a student's level of achievement. 

Progress in the program is contingent upon: 

1. Successful completion of courses in the major following a pre- 
scribed sequence with a grade of C or higher. A course in which a stu- 
dent is unsuccessful must be repeated before taking a more advanced 
course. 

2. A grade of C or higher in the natural science courses. These 
courses must be completed prior to matriculating in upper division 
nursing. 

Required General Education courses include the following: 

Behavioral Sciences, including Psychology 1, 90; 

Sociology 20 11 hours 

History (Selected from 1, 2, 53, 54) 6 hours 

Humanities > < 4 hours 

Language Arts, including English 1, 2; Speech 1, 

Literature 1 1 hours 

*Physical Education (activity courses) 2 hours 

Religion 12 hours 

Natural Sciences, including Biology 11, 12; 22; 100; 

Chemistry 7:8 18 hours 

Nutrition 2 2 hours 

Electives (Must include a Fine Arts course) 6 hours 

*Physical Education is not required of Registered Nurse Students. 

82 



NURSING 

f27. INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING 3 hours 

An introduction to the comprehensive meaning of health and health care. The 
student is assisted in developing a beginning understanding of the role of the 
professional nurse, and the skills common to all areas of practice. This course is 
prerequisite to the nursing major. 

f57:58. PRINCIPLES OF NURSING PRACTICE 6 hours 

A course designed to teach broad concepts of patient response to illness and treat- 
ment and to assist in the development of skills needed in applying the principles 
from the physical, biological and social sciences as nursing efforts are made to 
assess needs; to plan and to provide appropriate patient care. 

fllO. PHARMACOLOGY 2 hours 

A study of drugs, their effects and nursing implications. 

1 11 5:116. CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE OF NURSING I AND II 12 hours 

The theory and practice of nursing in dealing with selected basic needs of man 
through the life span in promoting health, intervening in illness, and assisting in 
the rehabilitation continuum. 

1124:125. CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE OF NURSING III AND IV 12 hours 

Continued theory and practice of nursing with added responsibilities in becoming 
increasingly self-directive in dealing with selected basic needs of man through the 
life span in promoting health, intervening in illness and assisting in the rehabili- 
tation continuum. Stress is placed on leadership aspects of the nurse's role. 

160. PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES 3 hours 

The study of current and emerging health problems and the utilization of com- 
munity resources in meeting the health needs of the individual, the family and 
society in general. Includes basic concepts derived from the basic public health 
sciences of epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental sanitation and community 
organization. 

fU6:167. COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING 10 hours 

A course which includes concepts and practice of nursing intervention measures 
with emphasis on total family health within the community; and of nursing 
intervention for individuals and families who have experienced extreme emotional 
responses. This course combines Public Health and Psychiatric Nursing. 

|180. CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE NURSING 5 hours 

A course designed to provide the student an opportunity to further develop his 
ability to assume nursing leadership through a combination of self-directed study, 
seminars, and selected experiences. 

185. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF CONTEMPORARY NURSING 3 hours 

A course designed to assist the student recognize the impact which historical events 
and current investigations have upon trends and the future of nursing. 

192. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of departmental chairman. 
Individual study in a field chosen in consultation with the instructor. 



ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM OF NURSING 

Chairman: Del La Verne Watson 

Faculty — Lorella Crago, Lenna Lee Davidson, Doris Davis, Ellen Gilbert, 
Maxine Page, Christine Shultz, Allene Wiesner. 

83 



NURSING 

ACCREDITATION 

The associate of science degree program is accredited by the 
National League for Nursing. It is registered with the Board of Regents 
of the Department of Education of the General Conference of Seventh- 
day Adventists; and is approved by the Tennessee Board of Nursing. 
Graduates of the program meet the requirements for admission to take the 
state board test pool examinations for licensure as registered nurses. 

PROGRAM 

The entire Associate Degree Nursing Program is offered on the 
Collegedale Campus. Clinical experience in several hospitals and other 
community agencies is selected on the basis of student need and program 
objectives. There is close correlation of theory and practice. 

During the summer following the freshman year, the student enrolls 
in three hours of general education. Either preceding or following this, 
the student will have six weeks of clinical experience in one of the 
Church related hospitals as arranged. 

The graduate will be prepared to provide care which is common, 
recurring, controlled and immediate in nature. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Academy, or high school chemistry (minimum grade of "C") is 
required for admission to the program. High school chemistry is offered 
during the summer session. 

Course Requirements — Associate of Science in Nursing. Thirty-five 
hours in nursing including courses 11, 12, 65. 66, 67, 68, and 79. An 
average of C is required for co-requisite courses and students are required 
to show satisfactory performance on general tests as designated by the 
department. General education courses include the following. 

Biology 11, 12; 22 9 hours 

English 1:2 6 hours 

Home Economics 2 2 hours 

Physical Education 1 hour 

Psychology 1, 90 5 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Sociology 20 3 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

fll. NURSING A I 5 hours 

Co-requisites: Biology 12, Nutrition 2. 

Orientation to the broad concepts of nursing, its heritage and role in our changing 
society. Maintenance of personal health and well-being is emphasized. The 
student learns to meet normal health needs of patients, to identify and solve 
nursing problems, and to apply techniques in giving individualized nursing care. 
Three hours lecture; two hours clinical experience. 

84 



OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

fl2. NURSING A II 8 hours 

Co-requisites: Biology 22; Psychology 1. 

A continuation of the principles of Nursing A I with emphasis on the nursing 
needs of ill persons and the role of the nurse as a member of the health team. 
Five hours lecture; three hours clinical experience. 

*t*5, 66. NURSING A III, IV 10 hours 

Co-requisite: Psychology 90. 

Focuses on meeting basic human needs from birth through senescence, including 
the maternity cycle. Includes family centered care and emphasis in problem solving 
in a patient centered approach. Six hours lecture; four hours clinical experience. 

*f67. 68. NURSING A V, VI II hours 

A study of the nursing needs of patients in all age groups with more complex 
nursing needs. The rehabilitative aspects of care and more advanced mental 
disorders are explored. In guided health agency experiences, the student develops 
increased ability to recognize situations which demand resourceful and imagina- 
tive thinking and to identify and seek solutions to individual patient needs. In 
addition, the student is oriented to the problems and responsibilities of the reg- 
istered nurse as an individual practitioner, a member of the nursing profession 
and as a contributing member of the community. Six hours lecture; four hours 
clinical experience. 

79. NURSING A VII I hour 

Study of the influence of social, political, religious, health and scientific move- 
ments on the progress of nursing. Study of current concepts in nursing care. 
Orientation to the problems and responsibilities of the registered nurse as an 
individual practitioner, a member of the nursing profession and an active member 
of the community. 



tCourse includes correlated laboratory practice or field work. A semester hour of 
credit for laboratory practice or field work is defined as a three-hour period of 
weekly practice for one semester or approximately 18 weeks. 

*Recorded grade at mid term. 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

Richard Stanley, Eleanor Walker, Lucile White 

Major: Thirty-six hours for the Bachelor of Science degree, includ- 
ing courses 15, 55, and 72. Business Administration 31, Data Processing 
54, and Home Economics 61 are to be taken as cognate requirements. 
Business Administration 32, 71, 72, 155, 156; and Psychology 1 are 
highly recommended. 

The general education requirements, with the exception of for- 
eign language study, are the same as those listed for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. 

A student looking forward to service as a medical secretary should 
plan to take courses 73 and 119. Biology 11 and 12 should be taken as 
partial fulfillment of the general education natural science requirement. 
Office Administration 72 may be omitted in pursual of this program. 

85 



OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

Minor: Eighteen hours including six hours of upper division credit. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

Two- Year Curriculum in Office Administration: Sixty-four hours 
are required for the Associate of Science Degree in Office Administra- 
tion including Office Administration 15, 55, 61, 72, 76, and Business 
Administration 31; English 1-2; Physical Education including Health 
3 hours; six hours of Religion; six hours of Social Science; and electives 
sufficient to make a two-year total of 64 semester hours. 

A student who wishes medical emphasis in the Associate of Science 
Degree should plan to take courses 73 and 119. Biology 1 1 and 12 should 
be taken as partial fulfillment of the general education natural science 
requirement. Office Administration 72 may be omitted in pursual of 
this program. 

9. SHORTHAND I 4 hours 

Prerequisite: One year of high school typewriting. Typing speed of 35 words a 

minute. 

Fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand. Five class periods each week. 

10. SHORTHAND II 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Office Administration 9 or equivalent to one unit of high school 
shorthand. Office Administration 14 must be taken concurrently with this course 
unless the student has had the equivalent. Five class periods each week, 

13. BEGINNING TYPEWRITING 2 hours 
Five class periods each week. One hour laboratory a week is required. Basic 
keyboard fundamentals; development of manipulative techniques; development 
of speed and accuracy on straight copy material and problems; introduction to 
business letters; simple tabulation. For students with no previous training in 
typewriting. Students with one year of high school typewriting receive no credit. 
Thirty-five words a minute for 5 minutes is required. 

14. INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Office Administration 13 or equivalent. 

Three class periods each week. Two hour laboratory a week is required. Con- 
tinuation of 13; improvement of basic skills; business letter production; tabulated 
reports; manuscripts; special business forms. Fifty words a minute for 5 minutes 
is required. 

15. ADVANCED TYPEWRITING 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Office Administration 14 or equivalent. 

Three class periods each week. Two hour laboratory a week is required. Prepara- 
tion of final copy from rough drafts; and typing of financial statements, and 
simple and complex statistical and similar tables, and direct process duplicators. 
Sixty words a minute for 5 minutes is required. 

55. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND AND TRANSCRIPTION 5 hours 

Prerequisites: Office Administration 10 and 15. 

Skill building in shorthand with emphasis on rapid transcription of shorthand 
notes. Letter-writing problems are discussed with mailable transcripts as the 
ultimate goal. Ten class periods per week. 

86 



OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

61. VOICE TRANSCRIPTION 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Freshman Composition; Intermediate Typewriting or the equivalent. 
A course in the operating of voice-writing equipment emphasizing business Eng- 
lish, mailable transcription, and the IBM Executive typewriter. 

62. ADVANCED VOICE TRANSCRIPTION 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Voice Transcription 61 

An advanced course in operating voice-writing equipment in emphasizing mailable 

transcriptions. 

72. OFFICE ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

A study of filing systems, grooming, business ethics, and various procedures used 

by a secretary. 

73. MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

A study of filing systems, grooming, business and medical ethics, and procedures 

used by a medical secretary. 

76. BUSINESS MACHINES 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Business Administration 31, or equivalent. 

The theory of and practice in the application of the following office machines to 
accounting procedures; key-driven, printing and rotary calculators, full keyboard 
and ten-key adding machines, and electronic calculators. 

119. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Office Administration 55, or equivalent. 

A study of medical terms — their pronunciation, their spelling, and their meaning. 

Four class periods each week, 

141. BUSINESS AND OFFICE MANAGEMENT 3 hours 

Major emphasis is placed on application of business management principles to 
the problems of the businessman and on the organizing of business and secretarial 
offices. Attention is given to the training of office employees, selection of equip- 
ment, and flow of work through the office. 

146. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: English 1:2. 

A study and application of the modern practices in oral and written business 
communications. Accuracy in grammar, spelling, and punctuation, and the writ- 
ing of well-knit sentences and clear paragraphs are taught as a means of effective 
expression in business-letter writing. 

169. SECRETARIAL SEMINAR 3 hours 

Practice in and discussion of general office procedures, transcription of letters 
and business reports from shorthand and from transcription machines, and the 
use of specialized business vocabularies. 

170. THE LEGAL SECRETARY 3 hours 
Emphasis is given to studying the terminology and duties of a legal secretary. 
Pronunciation, spelling, and meaning of legal terms are emphasized. Transcrip- 
tion of mailable documents is stressed. 

171. THE MEDICAL SECRETARY 3 hours 
Emphasis is given to studying the terminology and duties of the medical secretary. 
Pronunciation, spelling and meaning of medical terms are emphasized. Transcrip- 
tion of mailable documents is stressed. 



87 



PHYSICS 

174. APPLIED OFFICE PRACTICE 1-2 hours 

For Office Administration majors and prospective business teachers. This course 
is based on an activity program which provides practical experience in repre- 
sentative types of office situations. Students wishing emphasis in the medical 
office area will be placed in a medical organization to receive this experience. 

181. PROBLEMS IN OFFICE ADMINISTRATION I or 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in Office Administration. 
Problems are assigned according to the experience and interests of the student. 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING BUSINESS 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

PHYSICS 

Ray Hefferlin, Henry Kuhlman 

The department attempts to communicate to non-technical people 
that Physics is a worthwhile part of the human experience. This it does 
through its courses 1 and 126, and through making its exhibits, labora- 
tories, and research work visible on the campus. 

For technically -minded students, the department offers BS and BA 
majors and a minor. 

Numerous innovations in teaching methods have been introduced 
by the department, among these being the use of the computer in SMC 
classes. Students in courses through 103 use existing software for home- 
work and laboratory assignments and will be encouraged to write their 
own software. Students in courses 151 and beyond will be expected to 
write approximately three significant software programs per semester. 

Major; Thirty hours for the Bachelor of Arts including courses 
51:52; 53:54; 61:62; 101; and 126. Credit for course 126 may be 
applied on the religion requirements or on the major in Physics. Cog- 
nate requirements: either Introduction to Programming or Electronics 
(non-departmental). This degree exists for those whose interest in Physics 
is from a non-professional standpoint, or who are preparing for a field in 
the medical arts, or who plan to teach on the secondary level. 

Major: Forty hours for the Bachelor of Science with a major in 
Physics including courses 51:52, 53:54; 61:62; 101; 126; 151; 161:162; , 
171:172; and a minimum of three hours of 183r. Credit for course 
126 may be applied on general education religion requirements or on the 
major. Introduction to Programming 44 and Basic Electronics 70 (non- 
departmental) are cognate requirements. A Mathematics minor includ- 
ing Mathematics 112 or 146 is required. 

Students planning to proceed with graduate work in Physics or 
employment in the profession should take the program leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree, which is a research type degree. The follow- 
ing general education requirements for this degree apply only to stu- 
dents pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics, 

88 



PHYSICS 

Applied and Fine Arts 6 hours 

Foreign Language 

(German or French Recommended) 6-14 hours 

Humanities 4 hours 

Language Arts, including English 1:2 8 hours 

Physical Education and Health 4 hours 

Religion, including 2 of the following: 

10, 50, 105 , 12 hours 

Social Science (including History 1, 2 or 53, 54) 9 hours 

Minor: Eighteen hours including six hours of upper biennium. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS AND SOCIETY 3 hours 

A General education course stressing the concepts of physics, and their applications 
in human society, without mathematical derivations. Space travel, atomic weapons 
and nuclear power, lasers, population growth, the mobile-affluent society, and the 
environment. The laboratory emphasizes the use of computation devices and also 
observations from readily available items. Applies on natural science requirement. 
Does not apply on major or minor in physics. Two hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory each week. 

51:52. GENERAL PHYSICS 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 51. 

A general education course stressing the algebraic and trigonometric treatment of 
mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, and "modern physics." 
Applies on the basic science requirement as a non-laboratory science if taken 
alone, and as a laboratory science if taken with Physics 61:62. 

53:54. EXTRA HOUR OF GENERAL PHYSICS 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in Physics 51:52; and Mathe- 
matics 52. 

One class period per week on advanced problems and derivations based upon 
General Physics. 

61:62. GENERAL PHYSICS LABORATORY 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in Physics 51:52. 
Laboratory experience designed to illustrate the material in lectures, to familiarize 
the student with useful measuring apparatus, and to encourage a systematic 
development of scientific curiosity, caution, and method. 

*100. ASTROPHYSICS 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 52 concurrently. 

Optics, behavior of plasmas, spectroscopic techniques used by astronomers and 
laboratory astrophysicists. This course is designed to qualify the student to 
, participate in the departmental research program. Considerable reading of the 
scientific literature in the field. The student will have opportunity to use com- 
puter software to compute blackbody functions, plasma temperatures, and plasma 
equilibrium abundances. 

101. ELEMENTARY MODERN PHYSICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 51:52; Mathematics 52. 

Continuation and conclusion of Physics 51:52. Relativity, quanta, atomic struc- 
ture, nuclear properties and radiations, nuclear power, and wave mechanical cal- 
culations in one dimension. This course is designed with the needs of chemistry, 

89 



PHYSICS 

biology, mathematics and computer science students in mind. The student will 
use computer programs for relativistic motion, for nuclear decay, and for atomic 
wave functions. Three hours lecture per week. 

*102. PHYSICAL OPTICS 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 51:52; Mathematics 91. 

Refraction, reflection, interference, and absorption of light are discussed from the 
standpoint of the ray and especially of the wave theories of light. 

103. KINETIC THEORY 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 53:54, Math. 91. 

Many properties of gases, liquids, and solids are derived from the assumption 
that matter is composed of small particles in motion. Three hours lecture each 
week. 
126. ISSUES IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND RELIGION 2 or 3 hours 

Prerequisite: One year of high school physics or chemistry or one semester of 
college physics or chemistry. 

Issues in modern physical science including "heat death of the universe," "free 
will of matter," "annihilation and creation of matter," and the difficulty in 
visualizing recent models of matter. Evolutionary naturalism as a very current 
viewpoint. Axiomatics. This course applies to the general education requirement 
for Science and Mathematics, or Religion. This course may also apply toward a 
Religion or Physics major or minor. No lab required. When taken through the 
WSMC School of the Air, this course carries two hours credit. 

151:152. ANALYTIC MECHANICS 6 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 101, Math. 111. 

The motion of a particle in gravitational and other classical fields is attacked 
using the techniques of differential equations. In the second semester, the be- 
havior of systems of particles, solids, and liquids are discussed. Special functions, 
vector theorems, transforms, and tensors are introduced as needed. Students will 
be expected to write software to display solutions to mechanical systems from a 
numerical point of view and from a special functions point of view. 

161:162. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 6 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 101, Math. 111. 

Analysis of electrical circuits. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, and the 
motion of charges therein. Maxwell's equations and the consequent prediction of 
electromagnetic waves. Applications to modern atomic and nuclear theory are 
stressed. Complex mapping, vector theorems, transforms, and special functions 
will be used after being introduced or reviewed. Computer programs will be 
written for special functions and for particle orbits. 

*1 71:1 72. ADVANCED MODERN PHYSICS 6 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 101; Mathematics 111; Concurrent enrollment in any two 
of Physics 151:152 or 161:162 or Mathematics 112 or 146. 

An advanced treatment of atomic and nuclear physics, elementary particles, wave 
mechanics, relativity, and other topics on the frontiers of physics. 

183r. ADVANCED LABORATORY, PROBLEMS, AND RESEARCH 1-2 hours 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructors; Physics 102 concurrently for 1 hour optics 
option; Physics 161:162 concurrently for 2 hour Electricity and Magnetism option; 
Physics 92 concurrently for more than 1 hour option in spectroscopy research; 
Physics 171:172 concurrently for 2 hour Modern Physics option; Physics 76 for 
1 hour option in issues in science and religion. Course may be repeated for credit 
up to six hours. 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING PHYSICS 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 

90 



RELIGION 

RELIGION 

Douglas Bennett, Robert Francis, Frank Holbrook, Herman Ray, 
Smuts van Rooyen, Ronald Springett 

The major offered by the Division of Religion serves several cat- 
egories of students at Southern Missionary College. It serves candidates 
for the ministry of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, providing the 
undergraduate academic preparation for the Theological Seminary of 
Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan. The major in religion 
also serves students who may be preparing for secondary teaching, for 
the Bible Instructor program, for the work of Chaplain's Assistant, for 
work as residence hall deans in denominational institutions, and those 
who may be preparing for various professions, such as medicine, den- 
tistry, and law. 

Major — Religion: Thirty hours in the categories designated Bible 
and Religion including Bible 10; 105; 131, 132; 151, 152; Religion 50 
and 192, and Physics 126. 

Major — Religion with Teaching Emphasis: Thirty hours in the cate- 
gories designated Bible and Religion including Bible 10; 161; 131, 132; 
151, 152; Religion 50 and 192. 

Greek 31:32; 101: 102 is required. Ministry of Music 65 and History 
of the Christian Church 155, 156 is recommended to discharge General 
Education requirements in Fine Arts and Social Sciences. A Speech 
minor including Homiletics 119:120 is recommended. 

Students desiring to prepare for secondary teaching should work 
closely with the Education Department in meeting certification require- 
ments. A sequence schedule of required and recommended courses is 
available in the Department of Religion. 

Major — Ministerial Emphasis: The candidate for the ministry will 
pursue the following major, required interdepartmental minor, and 
adapted General Education subjects in order to meet the admission 
requirements of the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary. 

Students looking toward the ministry must make application to the 
Ministerial Recommendations Committee in the middle of the second 
semester of his sophomore year. Information and application forms for 
such purposes will be supplied by the Department of Religion. The 
favorable action of the Ministerial Recommendations Committee will be 
prerequisite to acceptance and/or sponsorship to the Theological Semi- 
nary, or to appointment to field responsibility in the ministry of the 
Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

Ministerial students interested in inner city programs from a "better 
living" approach are advised to take Home Economics 2 (Nutrition) and 
Religion 85 (Health Evangelism). These courses together with the 
required Health and Physical Education 53 (Health and Life) and 

91 



RELIGION 

Sociology 82 (Marriage and the Family) will furnish basic perspectives 
and skills. 

Thirty hours in Bible and Religion including Bible 10; 131, 132; 
151, 152; 161; Religion 50 and 192. 

Minor — Applied Theology: 

Psychology 80, or 112 

(112 for secondary certification) ^ 3 hours 

Speech 113, 117, or 118 3 hours 

Applied Theology 119:120 (Homiletics) 4 hours 

Applied Theology 73 (Personal Evangelism) 2 hours 

Applied Theology 170 

(Pastoral and Evangelistic Ministry) 4 hours 

Education 142 

(School Organization and Administration) 2 hours 

General Education Subjects: (For Ministerial Students only.) 

Applied Arts (Accounting 31 or Introduction to 

Business 41) 3 hours 

Music 65 (Ministry of Music) 3 hours 

College Composition 6 hours 

Foreign Language (Greek 31:32; 101:102) 14 hours 

Introduction to Public Speaking (Speech 1) 2 hours 

Humanities 4 hours 

Literature 3 hours 

Physical Education and Health 4 hours 

Science and Mathematics (including 6 hrs. lab. courses) 12 hours 

Social Science 1 7 hours 

15 hours of history, including courses 1, 2 (Survey 
of Civilization); 155, 156 (History of the Christian 
Church); 3 hours History elective; and Sociology 82 
(Marriage and the Family). 

Bible Instructors: Women students preparing to serve as Bible 
Instructors will take the 30-hour Religion ministerial emphasis major 
and should select minors in such areas as Home Economics, Music, or 
the Behavioral Sciences. Greek may be elected as meeting the foreign 
language requirement. A schedule of recommended courses is available 
upon application to the Department of Religion. 

Minor — Religion: Eighteen hours in Bible and Religion, six of which 
must be taken in the upper biennium. 

Optional Minors: Due to the arrangement of required subjects for 
the ministerial student, two additional minors may be easily obtained if 
desired. 

92 



RELIGION 

Biblical Greek: Eighteen hours including Biblical Languages 31:32; 
101:102; and 180: 181. 

History: Eighteen hours including either (a) History 1, 2; 51; 132; 
155, 156; or (b) History 1, 2; 53, 54; 155, 156. 

Summer Field Programs: The major feature of the summer field 
programs of the Department of Religion is the evangelism field school 
conducted under the auspices of the Department and offering 4 hours of 
credit in the course, Pastoral and Evangelistic Ministry, 170. 

Additional programs for the individual student and student teams 
may be available by recommendation of the Department of Religion to 
the several conferences of the Southern Union Conference territory. 

Details concerning the field school and the associated programs and 
application forms for the same, are available through the Department of 
Religion. 

BIBLE 

10. TEACHINGS OF JESUS 3 hours 

A study of the basic teachings of Christianity which provide a point of reference 
for contemporary issues. 

20. OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES 3 hours 

A chronological study of the Old Testament with particular emphasis upon God's 
relationship to ancient and spiritual Israel. Especially recommended for those with 
limited knowledge in Biblical backgrounds. Not open to those who have taken 
Bible Survey. 

105. GREAT THEMES OF DANIEL AND REVELATION 3 hours 

A study of prophetic literature which pertains to the end of the age and the 
consummation of the Christian hope. Not open to those who have taken Escha- 
tology. 

131, 132. OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS 6 hours 

A survey of the major and minor prophets of the Old Testament including a 
background of their lives and teaching, with the application of their messages 
for modern man. 

151, 152. PAULINE EPISTLES 6 hours 

An exegetical study of the Pauline epistles in the order of their composition, in- 
cluding a background survey of the book of Acts. 

161. DANIEL AND REVELATION 5 hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, 2 or 131, 132. 

A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of the books of Daniel and Revelation 
including a survey of their backgrounds and historical settings. Open to 
ministerial and Bible Instructor candidates only, preferably following completion 
of courses in Biblical Greek. 

RELIGION 

50. FOUNDATIONS OF THE ADVENT MOVEMENT 3 hours 

A study of the world-wide advent emphasis of the early nineteenth century 
and the subsequent development of tie Seventh-day Adventist church and 
faith, and of the contributory role played by the spiritual gift of prophecy 
in its development. 

93 



RELIGION 

150. SANCTUARY AND ATONEMENT 3 hours 

The study of the underlying principles of the plan of salvation as revealed in the 
sanctuary services of the Old Testament. 

155. CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY 3 hours 

An examination and defense of the Christian philosophy in the setting of current 
philosophical trends. 

157. COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS 3 hours 

Theological study of the major Christian and non-Christian religions of the world, 
including a survey of the history and the distinctive characteristics of each. 

184. ESCHATOLOGY 3 hours 

A study of the concepts in prophetic literature that pertain to the end of the world 
and the consummation of the Christian hope. 

192. CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Bible 10. 

An introduction to theology designed to give the pre- seminary student a founda- 
tional base for advanced study in the area of systematic theology. Open to religion 
majors only. 



APPLIED THEOLOGY 

73. PERSONAL EVANGELISM 2 hours 

A study of methods, and development of the art of presenting Bible instruction 
to individuals and small groups. 

85. HEALTH EVANGELISM 3 hours 

A training course in practical nursing care, hydrotherapy, and health education 
with a survey of city agencies and resources available to the public. Recommended 
for those interested in inner-city evangelism from a health viewpoint. 

119:120. HOMILETICS 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Speech 1 and Speech 113, 117, or 118. 

Training in the preparation and presentation of the various types of talks and 
addresses the Christian worker or preacher is called upon to give. One hour 
lecture and two hours laboratory each week. 

170. PASTORAL AND EVANGELISTIC MINISTRY 4 hours 

A study of the methods and principles of pastoral and evangelistic ministry. 
This course is available both during the regular academic year and also in 
connection with the summer Field Schools of Evangelism. 



BIBLICAL LANGUAGE 

31:32. ELEMENTS OP NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 8 hours 

A study of the grammar and syntax of the vernacular koine Greek of New 
Testament times, with readings in the Epistles of John. 

101:102. INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 6 hours 

A course in advanced studies, grammar and syntax of koine Greek with 
translation of readings from the Gospel of John, the Synoptics and the Pauline 
Epistles. 



94 



RELIGION 

180:181. GREEK EXEGESIS 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Greek 101:102. 

A course in exegesis of selected passages from the Synoptic Gospels, Pauline and 
General Epistles, based on a grammatical and syntactical analysis of the original 
text with an introduction to textual criticism. 



SPECIAL RELIGION COURSES OFFERED ON EXTENSION CAMPUS 

54. PRINCIPLES OF SPIRITUAL THERAPY AND WORLD RELIGION 2 hours 

An understanding and use of the basic principles of Christianity as taught and 
applied in the medical ministry of Christ. A survey of the non-Christian religions 
with a more detailed study of the major Christian religions emphasizing how a 
knowledge of these beliefs may assist in professional relationships. 

95. PERSONAL EVANGELISM 2 hours 

Basic Bible truths and methods of sharing these truths effectively with others are 
studied with special consideration given to recognizing and developing opportuni- 
ties for spiritual ministry in Christian nursing service. 

Edu. 167. SPECIAL METHODS OF TEACHING BIBLE 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and 
evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of textbooks. 



95 



NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

AVIATION 
75. AVIATION FUNDAMENTALS 2 hours 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

53. INTRODUCTORY REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY 3 hours 
The basic reference books and the techniques for finding information and research 
materials. Useful not only as an introduction to librarianship but also for the 
general student who desires to know how better to use the library. 

54. ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS 3 hours 

The cataloging, classification, and preparation for the shelves of books; and the 
care and organization within the library of other kinds of library materials. 

105. LIBRARY MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE 3 hours 

The composition of the school library collection; and the selection, appre- 
ciation, and presentation of books and other library materials that are particularly 
suited to the needs of children and also of materials that are particularly suited 
to the needs of young people. 

156. SCHOOL LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Library Science 53, 54; or the permission of the instructor. 
Designed to impart a practical knowledge of how to organize and administer 
a school library and how to relate the library to the needs of the pupils. 

ELECTRONICS 

70. BASIC ELECTRONICS 4 hours 

Prerequisite: High school algebra and physics or equivalent. 

A study of the basic principles of DC and AC circuits, filters, transducers solid 
state devices, power supplies, oscillators, amplifiers. Designed to be useful to those 
concerned with measurements as in the physical sciences and to the area of com- 
munications; assumes no previous study of electricity or electronics. Two hours 
lecture and five hours laboratory per week. 

HUMANITIES 

50. HUMANITIES 4 hours 

An integrated study of Art, Literature, and Music as related to man's concern 
and aspirations. 

READING 

56. RAPID READING 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Reading Techniques or permission of instructor. 
A course designed to teach students how to comprehend material at rapid reading 
rates. The goal is to triple reading rate and improve comprehension. 

COORDINATED EVANGELISM 

50. COORDINATED EVANGELISM 2 hours 

All students participating in the Coordinated Evangelism plan must fulfill the 
following conditions in order to receive two hours of lower division credit on a 
one time non-departmental basis: 

96 



NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

1. Attend all the meetings of the one week training program which will precede 
eight weeks of literature evangelism. 

2. Canvass at least 300 hours, not including the evangelistic effort. 

3. Participate on a continuous basis in a two-week evangelistic effort under the 
supervision of the district pastor and conference ministerial secretary. 

Students will receive a grade of CR or NC for the two hours of college credit but 
will pay regular tuition. There are to be no incompletes. The work is to be com- 
pleted during the summer and prior to the student's enrollment at Southern 
Missionary College subsequent to the summer's work. 

DEGREE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Students interested in a career in medical technology should com- 
plete three years of college in residence and twelve months of clinical 
training at the Florida Sanitarium and Hospital, Orlando, Florida; the 
Baroness Erlanger Hospital, Chattanooga, Tennessee; Hinsdale Sani- 
tarium and Hospital, Hinsdale, Illinois; Kettering Medical Center Ket- 
tering, Ohio; or Madison Hospital, Madison, Tennessee. Upon completion 
of the clinical program, the degree Bachelor of Science with a major in 
Medical Technology is conferred. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree from SMC with 
a major in Medical Technology must complete the following re- 
quirements: 

Biology (Including 22, 47, 48) 16 hours 

Chemistry (Including 11:12; 

117, 122 highly recommended 16 hours 

Physics 51:52 and 61:62 8 hours 

Mathematics 51 4 hours 

History 6 hours 

English (Including 1:2 and 3 hours Literature) 9 hours 

Physical Education (activity) 2 hours 

Religion (Including 3 hours upper division) 9 hours 

Behavioral Science (upper division) 3 hours 

Humanities 4 hours 

The overall grade point average in the sciences required must be a 
minimum of 2,25. The total overall grade point average must be a mini- 
mum of 2.00. No more than four hours of "D" in a math or science area 
will be accepted. There must be a total of 96 semester hours with 27 
upper division prior to the fourth year. 

Students who wish to transfer to the Loma Linda University school 
of Medical Technology for their clinical training should consult the 
Loma Linda bulletin and follow its prescribed requirements. In such 
a case the B.S. degree will be conferred by Loma Linda University 
following completion of their clinical year. 

97 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Pre-professional and pre-technical curricula are offered in a wide 
variety of fields. Below are listed the curricula most frequently chosen. 
If other pre-professional programs are desired, faculty advisers are 
prepared to assist the student in working out a satisfactory sequence 
of courses needed to meet the admission requirements of the chosen 
professional school. 

DENTISTRY 

Although preference will be given to students with a broad academic 
experience, a minimum of two years of college work is required for 
admission to schools of dentistry. Students seeking admission to the 
Loma Linda School of Dentistry would do well to consider the ad- 
vantages of a four year degree program. A minimum grade point 
average of 2.5 (C=2.00) should be maintained in both science and 
non-science courses. The following courses must be included to meet 
the minimum requirements for admission to the Loma Linda Uni- 
versity School of Dentistry: 

Beginning Language 8 hours 

Biology 47, 48 and 145 11 hours 

Chemistry 11: 12; 1 13: 1 14 16 hours 

English 1:2 6 hours 

Industrial Education 15 4 hours 

Mathematics 51 4 hours 

Physics 51:52 or 93:94; 61:62 8 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Religion 8 hours 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

A career as a dental hygienist is of special significance to young 
women desiring employment as dental assistants. Students planning 
to take the Dental Hygiene program at Loma Linda University should 
take two years of college work (64 semester hours) including the fol- 
lowing courses: 

Biology 47, 48 and 22 1 1 hours 

Chemistry 7:8 or 11:12 6 hours 

English 1:2 6 hours 

History 53, 54 6 hours 

*Humanities (including 2 areas: Fine Arts, English, 

foreign language, philosophy, speech) 12 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Physical Education 22 2 hours 

Behavioral Science 6 hours 



*Humanities may be selected from Art 143, 144; Music 45, 4$; 65; 125:126; 
English 41; 63; 64; 85; 97; Language 1-2; 93:94. 

98 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

LAW 

The student interested in the study of law as a profession should 
become acquainted with the entrance requirements of various law 
schools. A free copy of the brochure entitled "Law School Admission 
Test" may be secured by writing to the Educational Testing Service, 
Box 944, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. This will make possible the 
planning of a pre-professional program which will qualify the student 
for admission to several schools. Although admission is granted by 
some schools to gifted students after three years of college, it is wise 
to plan a degree program with a major and minor preference in busi- 
ness administration (including accounting), economics, social science, 
mathematics or English. Certain courses recommended by all institutions 
include: American history, freshman composition, principles of econom- 
ics, American government, creative writing, principles of accounting, 
English history, business law, speech, and mathematics. 

The student is advised to obtain the booklet "Law Schools and 
Bar Admission Requirements" published by the Section of Legal Edu- 
cation and Admissions to the Bar, American Bar Association, 1155 
East 60th Street, Chicago, Illinois, which provides information concern- 
ing the desired pre-professional backgrounds. 

MEDICAL RECORDS LIBRARIANSHIP 

Students who desire to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in Medi- 
cal Records Librarianship should complete two years of general education 
course work at Southern Missionary College and then proceed to Loma 
Linda University to concentrate on Medical Records Administration 
subjects during the junior and senior years. The pre-professional curricu- 
lum should include the following courses: 

Freshman English 6 hours 

Humanities (Select from at least two fields: Fine 
Arts, foreign language, literature, philoso- 
phy, and speech) 12 hours 

Biology 11, 12 6 hours 

Social Science: General Psychology, history, (per- 
sonnel management and business adminis- 
tration strongly recommended) . Select from: 
sociology, economics and geography 12 hours 

Religion 6-8 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a total of 64 hours. 

MEDICINE 

Medical colleges, as a rule, require the completion of academic 
requirements for a baccalaureate degree. Along with the completion 
of stated admission requirements, a oroad college program of liberal 

99 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

education is preferred to give balance to professional studies and later 
service. 

Applicants for admission to the Loma Linda University School 
of Medicine are expected to maintain a grade point average of at 
least 2.5 (C = 2.00) in both science and non-science courses. The fol- 
lowing courses must be included in the applicant's academic pro- 
gram. 

Biology 47, 48 - 8 hours 

Chemistry 11:12; 113:114 16 hours 

English 1:2 6 hours 

Mathematics 51, 52 8 hours 

Physics 51:52; 61:62 8 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

Two years of college work are required for admission to the 
Loma Linaa University School of Occupational Therapy. The Bach- 
elor of Science degree is conferred by Loma Linda University upon 
completion of two additional years of professional training. The 
pre-professional curriculum should include the following courses: 

Behavioral Sciences (including Psychology 1) 6 hours 

Biology 47, 48 8 hours 

Chemistry 7:8 or Physics 51:52 (with lab.) and 

Math 6-9 hours 

English 1-2 r 6 hours 

^Humanities (including Speech and one or more 
of the following: Fine Arts, English, foreign 

language, philosophy) 8 hours 

Social Science: (including psychology and sociology 8 hours 

Literature < 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Religion 6-8 hours 

Information concerning occupational therapy opportunities, etc., 
may be obtained by writing the American Occupational Therapy As- 
sociation, 250 West 57th Street, New York City 19, New York. 

OPTOMETRY 

The optometry program of study usually consists of a five-year 
curriculum, the first two years of which should be taken in an ac- 
credited college. The following courses which should be included in 



♦Humanities may be selected from Art 143, 144; Music 45, 46; 65; 125:126; 
English 41; 63; 64; 85; 97; Language 1-2; 93:94. 

100 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

the two years' work will fulfill the entrance requirements for most 
colleges of optometry. The student, however, should check with the 
requirements of the school of his choice. A list of approved colleges 
may be secured by writing to The American Optometry Associa- 
tion, 4030 Chouteau Avenue, St. Louis 10, Missouri. 

Biology 47, 48 and 22 1 1 hours 

Chemistry 11:12 8 hours 

English 1:2 6 hours 

Mathematics 5, 51 4 hours 

Physics 51:52; 61:62 8 hours 

Psychology 1 3 hours 

Religion 8 hours 

Electives (should include courses in social science, 
literature, speech, fine arts, and additional 

hours in mathematics and biology) 14 hours 

OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE 

Over the past several years numerous graduates of Seventh-day 
Adventist undergraduate colleges have attended the Kansas City Col- 
lege of Osteopathy and Surgery in full religious harmony, and now 
serve as physicians in local conference and foreign missions. The 
requirements for admission are: 

Baccalaureate degree 

Minimum of 2.4 (B-C) average 

M.C.A.T. and M.M.P.L test results 

Chemistry (General, Qualitative, Organic) 13-18 hours 

Biology (Zoology, Embryology) 8 hours 

Physics, 8 hours 

English, 8 hours 

Electives as needed to complete the degree. Genetics, Statistics 

and Physical Chemistry will prove helpful if your program 

permits. 

For detailed requirements and a college catalog write to 2105 
Independence Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri 64124. For denomina- 
tional information write to the Secretary-Treasurer of the National 
Association of Seventh-day Adventist Osteopathic Physicians (NAS- 
DAO), 8410 Willow Way, Raytown, Missouri 64138 or your Local, 
Union, or General Conference Medical Secretary. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Two years of college work is required for admission to the 
Loma Linda University School of Physical Therapy. After the com- 

101 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

pletion of two additional years of professional training, the Bachelor 
of Science degree is conferred by Loma Linda University. The fol- 
lowing courses should be included in the pre-physical therapy cur- 
riculum to qualify for admission to L.L.U. Students not having had 
high school physics must enroll in college physical science. 

Behavioral Sciences 1 and 20 6 hours 

Biology 47, 48 8 hours 

Chemistry 7:8, or 11:12 6 hours 

English 1:2 6 hours 

History 3 hours 

* Humanities (including 2 areas: Fine Arts, English, 

foreign language, philosophy, speech) 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Religion 6-8 hours 

Speech 2 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a total of 64 hours. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Since admission requirements vary, the student should obtain a 
list of the accredited veterinary colleges by writing to American 
Veterinary Medical Association, 600 South Michigan Avenue, Chi- 
cago 5, Illinois. 

As a rule, most schools of veterinary medicine require two years 
of college work. Upon completion of four additional years of pro- 
fessional study, the student should be eligible for the Doctor of Veter- 
inary Medicine. The student is advised to acquaint himself with the 
entrance requirements of the professional school of his choice. 

X-RAY TECHNOLOGY 

The Loma Linda University School of X-ray Technology re- 
quires the following hours of college work for admission: 

Biology 11, 12 6 hours 

Chemistry 7:8 6 hours 

Mathematics 5, 51 4 hours 

Physics 51:52; 61:62 8 hours 

Religion 4 hours 

A list of approved schools of X-ray technicians may be obtained 
by writing to die American Society of X-ray Technicians, 16 Four- 
teenth Street, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. 



^Humanities may be selected from Art 143, 144; Music 45, 46; 65; 125:126; 
English 41; 63; 64; 85; 97; Language 1-2; 93:94, Speech and Humanities. 



102 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 
Student Financial Information 

1972-73 

Planning for college requires careful consideration of a number of 
new responsibilities. Financial planning is not the least of these. A 
college education in a Christian school is a valuable experience. Educa- 
tion costs in general are increasing each year and Southern Missionary 
College has not been exempt from these rising costs although costs are still 
below the national average for private colleges. 

SMC has made a large investment in vocational and auxiliary enter- 
prises making it possible for those students who have limited financial 
assistance to work and defray a substantial portion of their school 
expenses. 

STUDENT FINANCIAL BUDGET AND CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT 

Each applicant must submit before registration time a financial 
budget on the form provided with his application to Southern Missionary 
College. 

When a student is accepted under an approved budget which 
requires on-campus labor, the Director of Student Finance will make 
a reasonable effort to assist that student in finding work to the extent 
called for in the student's budget. The student is not to regard this 
acceptance as a guarantee that he shall be provided with work. It is 
the student's responsibility to make a personal effort to secure employ- 
ment, to prove that he can render valuable service on the job, and to 
arrange a class schedule that is compatible with a reasonable work 
program. 

Community students are considered on a cash basis, and it shall 
be understood that students living in residence halls will be given 
employment preference in the assignment of work opportunities in the 
auxiliary and vocational enterprises operated by the College. 

ADVANCE PAYMENT 

All students are required to make an advance payment at or 
before registration. The advance payment for all students registering 
for five or more semester hours is $300. Those students who register 
for less than five semester hours may pay the total tuition charge in 
advance in lieu of the advance payment. 

The advance payment less any housing charge (see Housing 
Deposit) is credited to the student's account at the close of the school 
year or under certain conditions upon his withdrawal from school. 

Married Couples as Students — When a married couple enrolls for 
a combined total of seventeen hours or less of school work, they shall 
be charged tuition as one person and only one advance payment. 

103 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

HOUSING DEPOSIT 

Before a housing or room reservation may be made, $50 of the 
advance payment must be paid as a housing deposit. Tentative reserva- 
tions may be made without a deposit before July 15; however, the deposit 
must be made by that date in order to hold the reservation. After July 15 
requests for reservations must be accompanied by the $50 payment. 

If notice of nonattendance is given to the College by August 1, 
one-half of the housing deposit is refundable. After August 1 no refund of 
the payment will be made, except as provided for in the following 
paragraph. 

Students who register at the college and remain in residence a mini- 
mum of thirty days are eligible for deposit refunds which will be credited 
to their final statements. Costs of repairing damages to dormitory rooms 
and college apartments and of cleaning apartments and rooms that are 
not left in good condition will be charged to the students and deducted 
from the housing deposits. 

TUITION 

The schedule of tuition and general fee charges are as follows: 



Semester 


Semester 


Both Sem. 


Hours 


Tuition* 


Total** 


1-7 


$ 65 per hour 




8-11 


728 


$1456 


12-16 


848 


1696 


Over 16 


848 plus $55 per 
add. sem. hr. 





Summer School (1972) $50.00 per semester hour. 

* No separate general fee is charged. The tuition charge includes all items formerly 
covered by a general fee, including Student Association membership fee of $25.00 
for the year for all those taking 8 or more semester hours of classwork, a student 
insurance premium cost of $35.00, and Club dues of $2.50. 

* Audit: Tuition for audited courses will be charged at the same rate as courses 
taken for credit. 

* See Tuition Refunds 

** It is assumed that the students will pursue course loads equal to their financial and 
scholastic ability. Those residing in the residence halls or as married students 
living in other housing are required to take a course load of at least eight semester 
hours, which is one half of a full-course program. The student should observe that 
the most economical tuition rates are applied to full-course loads. 

Tuition for the first semester is divided equally (V4 each) between 
the months of September, October, November, and December. Tuition 
for the second semester is divided equally {% each) between the months 
of January, February, March and April. 

104 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

MUSIC TUITION 

The charge for private music instruction is $60.00 per semester for 
a minimum of 14 one-half hour lessons. In addition to private instruction 
in voice, classes of three or more students may be arranged at a cost per 
student of $45 per semester. All persons who wish to take music must 
enroll for it at the Admissions Office even if they are not taking it for 
credit or if music is all they are taking. There is a $2 registration fee for 
those who are taking music only. 

Students are expected to enroll for private lessons or class instruc- 
tion in an instrument or voice by the semester. Refunds will be allowed 
only when the instructor is not available for lessons. Music majors will 
not be charged for private music instruction in their applied major 
during their last two years in residence but will be charged tuition at 
the regular rate. 

TUITION REFUNDS 

A student may drop all classes within one week after registration 
with a $25 tuition charge. Subsequent to that time students who drop 
all classes will be charged tuition on a prorated basis based on an 18- 
week period. 

During the first week following registration, students may make 
necessary changes in their class programs without charge. After this a 
fee of $5 will be assessed for each change in the course program. After 
three weeks following registration there will be no reduction in tuition 
charges for classes dropped for the remainder of the semester. 

STATEMENTS AND METHOD OF BILLING 

Statements will be issued about the 5th day of each calendar month 
covering transactions through the end of the preceding month. The bal- 
ance due the college is to be paid by the 25th of the month for discount 
privileges. Should a student's account be unpaid by the 15th of the 
succeeding month his registration may be cancelled until such time 
as the balance is paid or satisfactory arrangements are made. 

EXAMPLE OF CREDIT POLICY 

Period covered by statement October 1-31 

Approximate date of billing November 5 

Discount period ends November 25 

Class attendance severed if still unpaid December 15 

The above schedule of payment must be maintained since the 
College budget is based upon the 100 percent collection of student 
charges within the thirty-day period following date of billing. A 
student may not take semester examinations, register for a new se- 
mester, or participate as a senior in commencement exercises unless 
his account is current according to the preceding regulations (see 
example of credit policy). No transcript will be issued for a student 
whose account is not paid in full. 

105 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Discounts — A cash and/or family discount on tuition is allowed 
when payment is made on or before the 25th of the month for the pre- 
vious month's charge. The amount of the discount varies with the num- 
ber of unmarried children enrolled from the same family in Southern 
Missionary College. The following rates apply. 

Number of Dependents Amount of Discount 

1 2 per cent 

2 5 per cent 

3 10 per cent 

A college student, to qualify for family discount, must be enrolled for 
a minimum of 8 semester hours. Accounts of all students who are 
counted for a family discount and for which the same parent is respon- 
sible, must be paid before discounts above 2% are allowed on any of the 
family accounts. The 2% discount is allowed on any student account 
paid in full by the 25th of the following month. 

SPECIAL FEES AND MISCELLANEOUS CHARGES 

The following special fees and charges are assessed separately 
inasmuch as they may not apply to all students nor do they occur 
regularly; 

Application for admission (not refundable) $ 5.00 

Automobile parking fee (per semester) 10.00 

Change of program 5.00 

Late registration 5.00 

Re-registration Fee 10.00 

Credit by examination 25.00 

Special examination for course waiver 5.00 

Transcript 1.00 

Graduation in absentia 10.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit $15.00 

(Refunded at the close of the course provided no 

breakage of equipment has resulted and locker 

and equipment is cleaned as prescribed.) 

Late return of organizational uniform 1.00 

(The full cost will be charged if irreparably 

damaged or not returned.) 

In addition to charges for rent, board and tuition the following 
expense items may be charged to the student's account upon his request: 

a. Books. 

b. Approved uniforms for physical education classes and recrea- 
tion. 

c. Subscriptions to professional journals as required by depart- 
ments of instruction. 



106 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

d. Nursing uniforms. 

e. Membership dues for professional clubs of nursing (T.A.S.N.) 
and education (S.N.E.A.) departments. 

f. Campus Kitchen Ticket Books (also valid at Village Market) — 
Two books per month. 

HOUSING 

Fifty dollars ($50) of the Advance Payment must be paid before a 
room or housing reservation may be made. (See Housing Deposit) 

Residence halls — Single students not living with parents are re- 
quired to reside in one of the college residence halls. These accommoda- 
tions are rented for the school year and charged to the student in eight 
equal payments September through April. The yearly room charges are 
as follows: 

Thatcher Hall $398 

TalgeHall 398 

Jones Hall 364 

Orlando Nursing Dormitory 382 

Rates include flat laundry service at the College laundry. Laundry in 
excess of flat work will be charged at regular published laundry prices. 

The room charges listed above include infirmary care and basic 
services provided by the Director of Health Service at the Health 
Service Center. 

The room charge is based on two students occupying a room. A 
student may, upon application to the residence hall dean, be granted the 
privilege or rooming alone when sufficient rooms are available. The 
surcharge for this arrangement is $15 monthly. 

No refund is made for absence from the campus either for regular 
vacation periods or for other reasons. If a student moves out of the 
residence hall during the school year, adjustment of room rent is made 
based on the number of days the room was occupied by the student or 
his belongings. 

Housing for Married Students — The College provides a number of 
apartments and mobile homes for married students. The apartments 
range in size from two to four rooms and most are unfurnished. Rents 
range from $52.50 to $105 per month. 

The mobile homes are two and three bedrooms in size and are 
furnished. Rents range from $85 to $105 per month. 

There are fifty or more privately owned apartments in the Col- 
legedale community. These also are available to students. Informa- 
tion may be obtained from the Director of Student Finance upon re- 
quest. 

FOOD SERVICE 

The cafeteria plan of boarding is used which allows the student 
the privilege of choosing his food and paying only for what he selects. 

107 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Board charges for students vary greatly. The average monthly charge 
in the cafeteria is approximately $55.00 for men and $40.00 for women. 
Individual charges have exceeded these averages substantially. The Col- 
lege applies no minimum charge but all students are urged to eat health- 
fully by avoiding between-meal snacks and by eating at the cafeteria 
where balanced meals are available. A student getting a nutritionally 
adequate diet by eating all meals at the cafeteria should expect to pay 
approximately $2.75 per day. 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

Dormitory room rates on the Collegedale campus include laundry 
flat work. Dry cleaning and laundry in excess of flat work will be 
charged at regular published laundry prices. 

ORLANDO CAMPUS EXPENSES— DIVISION OF NURSING 

The Division of Nursing offers part of its program on the College- 
dale Campus and part on the Orlando, Florida, Campus. Charges for 
tuition and other expenses follow the same schedule as for college work 
on the Collegedale campus. 

NURSING STUDENTS UNIFORMS 

Approximately $60.00 will be needed for uniforms and $30.00 for 
cape if cape is desired. The uniforms will be purchased the first se- 
mester of the sophomore year by those enrolled in the Baccalaureate 
program and in the first semester of the freshman year by those in the 
Associate in Sciences program. The cost of the uniforms only may be 
charged to the student's account if desired. 

STUDENT TITHING 

SMC encourages the payment of tithe and church expense by its 
student workers. In order to facilitate this practice, arrangements 
may be made by the student (except for those employed at the McKee 
Baking Co. and in the Federal Work-Study Program) to have ten percent 
of his school earnings charged to his account as tithe and two percent for 
church expense. These funds are then transferred by the College to the 
treasurer of the Collegedale Seventh-day Adventist Church. Tithe on 
earnings at the McKee Baking Company and from the Federal Work- 
Study Program must be withdrawn by the student at the College Student 
Finance Office and paid in cash. 

BANKING AND CASH WITHDRAWALS 

The accounting office operates a deposit banking service for the 
convenience of the student. Financial sponsors should provide students 
with sufficient funds through the banking service to cover the cost of 
personal items of an incidental nature and travel expenses off campus 
including vacation periods. Withdrawals may be made by the student 
in person only as long as there is a credit balance. These deposit ac- 
counts are entirely separate from the student's school expense account. 
Withdrawals from regular expense accounts are discouraged and per- 

108 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

mitted only under special arrangement with the Director of Student 
Finance and with the permission of the financial sponsor. 

Each student should bring approximately $75 for books and supplies 
at the beginning of each semester, if he desires to pay cash for these items. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Students applying for work, loans or scholarships should contact the 
Director of Student Finance, P. O. Box 370, Collegedale, Tennessee 
37315. 

STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 

Believing in the inspired words that "systematic labor should con- 
stitute a part of the education of youth," (E. G. White) SMC has 
made provision that every student enrolled may have the privilege of 
organizing his educational program on the "work-study" plan. "Jesus 
the carpenter, and Paul the tent-maker, . . . with the toil of the crafts- 
man linked the highest ministry, human and divine" (E. G. White). 
The College not only provides a work-study program, but strongly 
recommends it to each student enrolled. 

In order to provide work opportunities to students, industries are 
operated by the College. The industries must serve their customers daily, 
necessitating a uniform working force. To continue these industries in 
operation, students assigned thereto must continue their work schedules 
to the end of the term. (Preparation for tests should be a day-by-day 
matter.) Any student who drops his work schedule without making 
proper arrangements may be suspended from class attendance until 
proper arrangements are made with the Director of Student Finance. 
It should be understood that once a student is assigned to work in a given 
department, he is expected to remain there for the entire school year 
except in cases where changes are recommended by the school nurse or 
are made by the College. 

Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he 
must make prior arrangements with his work superintendent. In 
case of illness, he will inform the Health Service. 

The Office of Student Finance for the college strives to place 
students on jobs to the best of its ability. For various reasons the 
college cannot guarantee work to a student even though his application 
may have been accepted on a plan calling for an approximate number 
of hours of work per week. Some students choose class schedules with 
classes so scattered that a reasonable work program is impossible. 
Some are physically or emotionally unable to work, others are erratic 
at meeting work assignments. It is the responsibility of the student 
to render acceptable service to his employer in order to maintain a 
job. The department superintendent reserves the right to dismiss the 
student if his service is unsatisfactory. The student pay rate is $1.60 per 
hour. It may be higher if a student possesses special skills or training, 
or lower if an apprentice. 

109 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Birth Certificates and Work Permits — All students who expect 
to work and are under twenty years of age must present a Birth Certifi- 
cate upon registration. This certificate must be left on file in the office 
of the Director of Student Finance. No student will be permitted to 
work until the Birth Certificate is on file at the College. This is 
imperative under the laws of the State of Tennessee. 

Whenever a student seventeen years of age or under is registered, 
the College issues a Tennessee Employment Certificate. This must be 
signed and on file at the College before a student may start work. 

LABOR FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Foreign students on non-immigrant visas are required by law to 
secure permission before accepting any employment. Forms requesting 
this permission are obtained from the Office of Student Affairs, and if 
ininiigration authorities grant permission, foreign students can be em- 
ployed either on or off campus depending upon the type of permission 
granted. Foreign students with student visas are not allowed to work 
more than 20 hours a week. Wives may work only if they have student 
visas of their own or have immigrant visas. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Southern Missionary College provides financial aid for students 
through loans, scholarships and employment. A single application for 
financial aid, filed with the College will be used for most of the aid 
programs. 

The financial aid program is administered in conjunction with the 
nationally-established policy and philosophy which is that the parents 
are the primary and responsible source for helping a student to meet his 
educational costs. Financial aid is available to help fill the gap between 
the student's own resources (parental contribution, summer earnings, 
savings, etc.) and the total cost of attending Southern Missionary College. 
The amount of parental contribution will be based on the family's finan- 
cial strength: net income, number of dependents, allowable expenses and 
indebtedness, and assets. The Family Financial Need Analysis from the 
American College Testing Program is used in determining a student's 
eligibility for financial aid. 

VETERANS 

Southern Missionary College is approved by the Veterans Adminis- 
tration as an accredited training institution. Those who qualify for 
educational benefits should contact the nearest Veterans Administration 
office. A certificate of eligibility must be presented before registration is 
completed. The Veterans Administration counseling centers will pro- 
vide complete information concerning policies and procedures. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

Southern Missionary College participates in all of the Federal 
Government sponsored student aid programs that are applicable to under- 

110 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

graduate students. These programs are described below with other 
scholarship and loan funds available. For complete information and 
applications write to the Director of Student Finance. 

Educational Opportunity Grants — The Federal Government has 
made available limited funds to accredited colleges from which they 
may provide grants to full-time students of academic or creative promise 
who have exceptional financial need. These grants are available in 
amounts of $200-$1000. 

National Defense Student Loan Fund — The Federal Government 
has made loan funds available under the National Defense Student 
Loan Program for the purpose of providing financial assistance to 
qualified students seeking a college education. A maximum of $1,000 per 
year may be granted under this program. 

Nursing Student Loan Fund — The Federal Government has made 
loan funds available under the Nursing Student Loan Program for the 
purpose of providing financial assistance to qualified nursing students 
seeking a college education. A maximum of $2500 per year may be 
available under this program. 

Nursing Scholarship Program — The Federal Government has made 
scholarship funds available for nursing students of academic or creative 
promise who have exceptional financial need. These scholarships are 
available in amounts up to $2000 per year. 

Professional Nurse Traineeship Program for Registered Nurses — 
The Federal Government has made funds available for registered nurse 
students. During the last twelve months of the student's academic 
program, she/he may apply to receive a $200 monthly stipend in addition 
to all tuition and fees being paid. Forty-five dollars ($45) per month 
may be received for each dependent who receives over one-half his 
support from the enrollee. For further details contact the Director of 
Student Finance. 

Psychiatric-Mental Health Trainee Stipends for Nurses — For 
nursing students who want preparation for responsible positions in the 
psychiatric-mental health field, the National Institute of Mental Health 
has traineeships available. Only junior and senior nursing students are 
eligible. The support includes a yearly stipend of $1800 plus tuition, 
registration, ana laboratory fees. For information and application forms, 
contact the Chairman of the Baccalaureate Nursing Department. . 

Government Guaranteed Loans Program — The Federal Govern- 
ment has made available a program through which loans from private 
banks to students will be guaranteed by the Federal Government. Inter- 
est on these loans will be paid by the government until the student has 
completed his course of study. A maximum of $1500 per year may be 
available under this program. For complete information and applica- 
tion forms, write to the Director of Student Finance. 

Ill 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

College Work-Study Scholarships — Funds have been provided by 
the Federal Government to provide jobs to full-time students of academic 
promise at a wage scale above the normal student rates. Benefits to 
students are extended particularly to students from low-income families. 
Net earnings of approximately $25 per week may be earned under this 
program. For information and application forms, write to the Director 
of Student Finance. 

Secondary School Scholarships-^-Freshman students whose academic 
rank in secondary school is within the upper 5 percent of their graduating 
class and who have the recommendation of their faculty may receive a 
scholarship of $200 from Southern Missionary College. Contact the Direc- 
tor of Admissions for information. 

Teacher Education Scholarships — As an aid to young people who 
possess talents and interest in the field of elementary school teaching, 
scholarships amounting to $300 for the junior year and $600 for the 
senior year each may be made available by the Southern Union and 
local conferences of Seventh-day Adventists. SMC will provide oppor- 
tunity for students on these scholarships to work a part of their re- 
maining school expenses. For further details write to the Educational 
Secretary of the local conference in which you reside in the Southern 
Union. If you reside outside the Southern Union, write to the Superin- 
tendent of Education, Southern Union Conference, Box 849, Decatur, 
Georgia. 

Doctor Ambrose L. Suhrie Scholarship for Elementary Teachers — 
An amount of at least $250 is available each year to worthy students 
in training in Elementary Education. 

A. E. Deyo Memorial Scholarships — Each year the faculty of the 
Division of Nursing selects a graduating senior student to receive this 
award of $50. The student who is selected must have given evidence 
of good scholastic standing and Christian character and show promise 
of making a contribution to the Seventh-day Adventist medical work. 

W. B. Calkins Student of the Year Awards — Each year an award of 
$150 is made to an outstanding graduating senior student of nursing and 
a $50 award is made to an outstanding junior student of nursing. The 
selection of the recipients is made by the faculty in cooperation with the 
student body of the Division of Nursing. The selection is based on quality 
of nursing care rendered, leadership and citizenship. 

Kate Lindsay Award — The Loma Linda University Medical and 
Dental Alumni Auxiliary, Kentucky-Tennessee Chapter, presents an 
annual award consisting of a framed citation and a gift of cash to a 
sophomore associate of science degree nursing student. The recipient is 
selected by the nursing faculty on the basis of scholastic achievement 
(B average), potential for nursing, demonstration of good citizenship 
and Christian standards and participation in student functions and pro- 
fessional organizations. 

112 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Grants-in-Aid to Nursing Students — Seventh-day Adventist hos- 
pitals in the Southern Union Conference have funds available for Grants- 
in-Aid to students of Nursing in both the Associate degree and the Bac- 
calaureate degree programs. Students who receive this aid will agree 
to enter nursing service for a definite period of time at the hospital from 
which the funds are received. Nursing students who are interested 
should contact the Director of Student Finance at Southern Missionary 
College. 

O. D. and Anna Ruth McKee Scholarship Fund — One thousand 
dollars is available each year to Sophomore, Junior, and Senior students 
who have a grade point average of at least 2.25, who are of good char- 
acter and who show financial need. 

Alvin Christensen Memorial Loan Fund — This fund of $300 has 
been made available by Doctor and Mrs. L. N. Christensen for loan 
purposes to a college junior or senior majoring in biology or related 
fields who gives evidence of Christian sincerity, industry, satisfactory 
scholarship, and financial need. The interest rate of three per cent 
becomes effective one year after the borrower is no longer a student at 
the College, and the principal with interest is due and payable within 
three years. 

The Denmark Fund — This fund has been made available for loans 
to needy students by physicians interested in assisting young people in 
gaining a college education. Three percent interest oecomes effective 
when the borrower is no longer a student at the college. 

Alumni Loan Fund — A revolving fund is maintained by the 
alumni of the College. Allocations are made to working students in 
the junior or senior year on the basis of proved need, character, leader- 
ship potential, and good scholarship. Loans are usually limited to $100 
per student. 

1969 Alumni Loan Fund — A revolving fund is maintained by the 
alumni of 1969. Allocations are made to students in the junior or senior 
year on the basis of proved need, character, leadership potential, and 
good scholarship. Loans of up to $300 for a semester are available. The 
interest rate of three percent becomes effective when the borrower severs 
students relationship with the College, and the principal with interest is 
due and payable within one year thereafter. 

Educational Fund — Many young people are deprived of the privi- 
lege of attending college because of a lack of necessary means. To aid 
these, an earnest effort has been made to obtain donations for the es- 
tablishment of an educational fund, from which students worthy of help 
may borrow money for a reasonable length of time. Faithfulness in 
refunding these loans will make it possible for the same money to assist 
other students in school. There have been some gifts, and these have 
been used to help several young men and women complete their work 
in this College. But the needs of worthy students have been greater 

113 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

than the funds on hand; consequently, it has been impossible in many 
instances to render the needed assistance. It has therefore been de- 
cided to direct the attention of patrons and friends of the school to 
these facts and to invite them to give such means as they may desire 
to devote to this purpose. The College will be glad to correspond with 
any who think favorably of this plan, and will continue to use the gifts 
so that the best results may be obtained. 

United Student Aid Funds — Through this program loans are made 
at student's "hometown" bank and are guaranteed by United Student 
Aid Funds, Inc. Interest begins to accrue when the loan is made but no 
payment is made until course is completed. These loans are available 
with interest benefits from the Federal Government similar to the 
Guaranteed Loan Programs. In order that students may borrow through 
this program, Southern Missionary College is required to deposit $1,000 
for each $12,500 in loans made available. Applications are obtained at 
the college. For more information, write to Director of Student Finance. 

Deferred Payment of Education Costs — For students and parents 
desiring to pay education expenses in 12 or 15 monthly installments, 
instead of nine months, a deferred payment program is available through 
College Aid Plan, Inc., and also through Tuition Plan, Inc. Repayment of 
funds for four years of college may be made over a period of 48 to 72 
months. A typical loan of $1,000 for a school year would require 12 
monthly payments of approximately $89.00. 

The deferred payment plans may include insurance on the life of 
the student parent, disability insurance on the parent, plus trust adminis- 
tration in the event of the parents' death or disability. Agreements may 
be written to cover all costs payable to the College over a four-year period 
in amounts up to $20,000. Agreements may be cancelled at any time 
without penalty charge. 

Parents desiring further information concerning these deferred 
payment plans should contact the Director of Student Finance. 

Anton Julius Swenson Loan Fund — $1,000 a year of a $15,000 fund 
plus interest on the remaining balance of the fund is made available each 
year for financial assistance to worthy students of promise. Please 
write to Director of Student Finance for further information. 

Miscellaneous Funds — A limited amount of money in various 
scholarship and loan funds is available to students of promise who are 
in financial need. For information write to the Director of Student 
Finance. 

Reile-Mc Alexander Memorial Loan Fund — Loans may be granted 
from this fund on the basis of financial need, character, and academic 
promise. Preference will be given students majoring in nursing. Three 
percent interest rate becomes effective on the date the borrower termi- 
nates studies at the College, and the principal and interest is due and 
payable one year thereafter. 

114 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

E. T. Watrous Memorial Loan Fund — Small loans may be granted 
from this fund to assist students experiencing financial difficulty. The 
principal loan, plus 3% interest will be due and repayable one year after 
the borrower terminates student status at the College. 

William lies Scholarship Fund — This fund of $250 is applied in 
behalf of needy students of promise. 



115 



SMC TRUSTEES 



SMC TRUSTEES 

H. H. Schmidt, Chairman 
H. F. Roll, Vice Chairman 
J. H. Whitehead, Secretary 

E. A. Anderson 0. R. Johnson 

W. S. Banfield Harold Moody 

Vernon W. Becker Robert Morris 

Helen Crawford Burks 0. D. McKee 

T. K. Campbell C. L. Paddock, Jr. 

W. 0. Coe E. S. Reile 

Desmond Cummings L. C. Waller 

C. E. Dudley W. D. Wampler 

Don Holland Don W. Welch 

William lies Ben Wygal 

K. D. Johnson Tom Zwemer 
President, Oakwood College 
President, South Atlantic Conference 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

H. H. Schmidt, Chairman 
W. S. Banfield 0. D. McKee 

Vernon W. Becker H. F. Roll 

Desmond Cummings J. H. Whitehead 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Charles Fleming Frank Knittel 

Cyril Futcher Kenneth Spears 



116 



COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Knittel, Ph.D. (1967) President 

ACADEMIC 

Cyril F. W. Futcher, Ed.D. (1962) Academic Dean 

Arno Kutzner, Ph.D. (1971) Director of Admissions and Records 

Mary Elam, M.A. (1965) .. Assistant Director of Admissions and Records 

BUSINESS 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A. (1941-42) General Manager 

of Finance and Development 

Glenn Holtkamp (1972) Assistant General Manager 

R. C. Mills (1970) College Manager 

Robert Merchant, M.B.A., C.P.A. (1961) Treasurer 

LouesaR. Peters, B.A. (1964) Assistant Treasurer 

Laurel Wells (1964) Director of Student Finance 

STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Kenneth Spears, B.S. (1963) Dean of Student Affairs 

Lyle Botimer, M.A. (1969) Dean of Men 

Ted Winn, M.A. (1970) Associate Dean of Men 

i Assistant Dean of Men 

Florence Stuckey, B.A. (1972) Dean of Women 

Fae Rees, B.A. (1964) Associate Dean of Women 

Joyce Cotham, A.D. (1971) .... Assistant Dean of Women 

Haziel Henderson, B.A. (1970) Assistant Dean of Women 

Assistant Dean of Women 

(Orlando Campus) 

Kenneth Davis, M.A. (1970) Director of Counseling and Testing 

Norman Peek, Ph.D. (1963) Director of Audio- Visual 

Marian Kuhlman, B.S. (1949) Director of Health Service 

Virginia Nelson, R.N. (1969) Assistant Director of Health Service 

T. C. Swinyar, M.D. (1960) College Physician 

Gary Patterson, M.A. (1971) College Pastor 

Rolland Ruf, B.A. (1969) Associate College Pastor 

Desmond Cummings, B.A. (1971) College Chaplain 

117 



COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

COLLEGE RELATIONS 

William H. Taylor, M.A. (1958) Director of College Relations 

Mabel Wood, M.A. (1949) Assistant Director of Alumni Relations 

LIBRARY 

Charles Davis, M.A. (1968) Librarian 

Peggy Bennett, M.S. (1971) Assistant Librarian 

Lorann Grace, M.S. in L.S. (1970) - Assistant Librarian 

Marion Linderman, M.S. in L.S. (1962) Associate Librarian 

Marianne Wooley, M.S. in L.S. (1966) Assistant Librarian 

(Orlando Campus) 



SUPERINTENDENTS OF 
AUXILIARY AND VOCATIONAL SERVICES 

Harley Wells (1964) Custodian 

Francis Costerisan (1962) Plant Maintenance and Construction 

Robert Adams (1970) Collegedale Laundry 

Wayne Barto, B.S. (1967) Collegedale Bindery 

Don Spears (1970) College Broom Factory 

John Goodbrad (1953) f Collegedale Distributors 

Noble Vining, B.A. (1966) College Press 

Charles R. Lacey (1970) Grounds 

College Cafeteria 

Bruce Ringer, B.S. (1953) Southern Mercantile 

William Burkett (1970) Village Market 



118 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

FACULTY DIRECTORY 

EMERITI 

Theresa Rose Brickman, M.Ed., Associate Professor Emeritus of Sec- 
retarial Science 

B.A., Union College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma. 

Stanley D. Brown, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Library Science 
B.A., Columbia Union College, B.A. in L.S., University of North 
Carolina; M.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Ohio State 
University. 

Ruby E. Lea Carr, B.A., Registrar Emeritus 
B.A., Union College. 

Olivia Brickman Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor Emeritus of Education 
B.A., Union College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma. 

Olive Westphal, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Modern Lan- 
guages 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

J. Mabel Wood, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Music 
B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska. 



INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY / 

Dorothy Evans Ackerman, M.Music, Associate Professor of Music » 
B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.Music, University of Chattanooga. 
(1957) 

Bruce Ashton, D.M.A., Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Capital University; M.Mus., American Conservatory 
of Music, D.M.A., University of Cincinnati. (1968) 

Rudolf Aussner, M.A., Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

B.Th., Canadian Union College; M.Ed., Andrews University; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame. (1964) 

Sue Baker, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A, Columbia Union College; M.A., Pacific Union College. (1971) 

Douglas Bennett, B.D., Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Andrews University; 
B.D., Andrews University. (1961) J 

119 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Stuart P. Berkeley, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.A., Pacific Union College; Ed.D., 
University of the Pacific. (1971) 

Geneva Bowman, M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Madison College; M.S., Loma Linda University. (1964) 

Kenneth Burke, M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Food Science 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.Ed., Clemson College. (1972) 

M. D. Campbell, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Union College; Ph.D. Purdue University. (1968) 

Curtis Carlson, M.A., Instructor in Communications 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Memphis State Univer- 
sity. (1970) 

Jacqueline Casebeer, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Loma Linda University. (1972) / 

John Christensen, Ph.,D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State University. (1955) 

Ann Clark, M.A.T., Instructor in English 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A.T., University of Chatta- 
nooga. (1965) 

Jerome Clark, Ph.D., Professor of History 

B.Th., Atlantic Union College; M.Ed., University of Maryland; 
M.A., S.D.A., Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California. (1959) 

Lorella Crago, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1970) 

Thelma Cushman, M.A., Associate Professor of Home Economics -J 
B.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., 
Michigan State University. (1957) 

Lenna Lee Davidson, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Union College. (1968) 

C. E. Davis, M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Walla Walla College; B.S., University of Washington; M.S., 
Andrews University. (1963) 

Charles Davis, MSLS., Associate Professor of Library Science J 
B.A., Union College; M.A., Kansas State University; 
MSLS, University of Southern California. (1968) 

Doris Davis, M.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Loma Linda University; M.N., Emory University. (1966) 

120 



FACULTY /DIRECTORY 



y 



Donald Dick, Ph.D., Professor of Speech 

B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska; 
PhX>., Michigan State University. (1968) 

John Durichek, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., George Peabody College 
for Teachers. (1969) 

Linda Fenderson, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Loma Linda University. (1971) 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A. Associate Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.B.A., Northwestern Uni- 
versity. (1946) 

R. E. Francis, B.D., Associate Professor of Religion * 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., Andrews University; B.D., 
Andrews University. (1960). 

Cyril F. W. Futcher, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Andrews University; Diploma in Theology, Newbold College; 
Diploma of Education, University of Western Australia; M.Ed., 
Maryland University; Ed.D., Maryland University. (1962) 

William Garber, M.A., Instructor in Journalism 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Michigan State University. (1970) 

Robert Garren, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., Atlantic Union College; M.F.A., Rochester Institute 
of Technology. (1968) 

Bruce Gerhart, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., University of Tennessee. 
(1965) 

Ellen Gilbert, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Loma Linda University. (1967) 

Orlo Gilbert, M.Mus.Ed., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., La Siera College; M.Mus.Ed., Madison College at Harrison- 
burg, Virginia. (1967) 

Lois Graham, Ph.D., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Walla Walla College; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan. (1972) 

Floyd Greenleaf, M.A., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., George Peabody 
College for Teachers. (1966) 

121 



FACULTY DIRECTORY j 

Edgar 0. Grundset, M.A., Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., Walla Walla College. 

(1957) 

Zerita Hagerman, D.N.Sc, Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Union College; M.S., University of Colorado; D.N.Sc, Boston 
University. (1961) 

Minon Hamm, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers. (1966) 

James Hannum, M.A., Assistant Professor of Communications 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., University of Wisconsin. 
(1965) / 

Lawrence E. Hanson, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics *V 

B.A., Los Angeles State College; M.A., University of California; 
Ph.D., Florida State University. (1966) / 

Ray Hefferlin, Ph.Dr, Professor of Physics # 

B.A., Pacific Union College; Ph.D., California Institute of Tech- 
nology. (1955) 

Kathy Hinson, M.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Loma Linda University; M.N., Emory University. (1963) 

Frank Holbrook, M.Th., Associate Professor of Religion 

B. A., Columbia Union College; M.A., B.D., and M.Th., 
Andrews University. (1964) 

Shirley Howard, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Walla Walla College. (1971) / 

Eleanor Jackson, M.A., Associate Professor of Art , 4txc - s 

B.A., Walla Walla College; M.A., University of Oregon. (1967) 

Wayne Janzen, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Industrial Arts 

B.S., Andrews University; M.A., Western Michigan University; 
Ed.D., Texas AandM. (1967) , 

K. M. Kennedy, Ed.D., Professor of Education * 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee. (1951) 

Theresa C. Kennedy, M.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing , 4rtMX 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.N., University of Florida. (1966) 

Miriam Kerr, M.A., Assistant Professor of Nursing , 4M «s 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.A., Peabody College. (1970) 

Jackie Kinsman, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1971) 

122 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Frank A. Knittel, Ph.D., Professor of English 

B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado. (1967) 

Henry Kuhlman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A., Andrews University; M.S., Western Michigan University; 
Ph.D., Purdue University. (1968) , 

Huldrich H. Kuhlman, Ph.D., Professor of Biology * 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. (1946) 

Christine Kummer, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S., University of Alabama. (1969) 

Arno Kutzner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education \/ 

B.A., Walla Walla College; M.A., Loma Linda University; Ph.D., 
Arizona State University. (1971) 

Edward L. Lamb, M.S.S.W., A.C.S.W., Assistant Professor of Behavioral 
Science 
B.S., Union College; M.S.S.W., University of Tennessee. (1972) 

Marion Linderman, M.S. in L.S., Associate Professor of Library Science 
B.A., Southeastern Louisiana College; M.S. in L.S., Louisiana State 
University. (1962) y 

Delmar Lovejoy, M.A., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. (1965) 

John McClarty, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., University of Montana; M.A., Andrews University; Ed.D., 
University of Montana. (1972) 

Wilma McClarty, Ed.D., Associate Professor of English v 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Andrews University; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Montana. (1972) 

Genevieve McCormick, M.A., Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., Walla Walla College; M.A., University of Washington. (1966) 

Robert McCurdy, M.A., Assistant Professor of Computer Science >J 
B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.A., University of Georgia. 

(1967) 

James McGee, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Indiana University. (1965) 

Robert W. Merchant, M.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Business 
Administration V 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; C.P.A., American Institute 
of Certified Public Accountants; M.B.A., University of Arkansas. 
(1961) 



123 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Carl Miller, D.N.Sc, Professor of Nursing ■ 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S., University of Maryland; 
D.N.Sc, Boston University. (1964) 

Donald Moon, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Andrews University; M.S., (1972) 

Robert R. Morrison, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages ^ 

B.A., George Washington University; M.A., Middlebury College; 
Ph.D., University of Florida. (1967) 

Floyd Murdoch, M.A., Assistant Professor of History 
B.A. and M.A., Andrews University. (1968) 

Helmutt Ott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A., River Plate College; B.A., La Sierra College; M.A., Inter- 
American University. (1971) 

Maxine Page, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Madison College; M.S., Loma Linda University. (1965) 

Doris Payne, M.S., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Loma Linda University; M.S., Loma Linda University. (1968) 

LaVeta Payne, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Nebraska. (1966) 

Norman Peek, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
(1963) 

Christine Perkins, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., Emory University. (1970) 

Arthur Richert, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A. and Ph.D., The University 
of Texas at Austin. (1970) j 

Marvin L. Robertson, Ph.D., Professor of Music v 

B.Mus., Walla Walla College; M.A., University of Northern Colo- 
rado; Ph.D., Florida State University. (1966) 

Cecil Rolfe, Ph.D., Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.B.A., University of Maryland; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland. (1964) 

Barbara Ruf, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.A., Boston University. (1969) 

Don Runyan, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Indiana. (1968) 

124 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Jan Rushing, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.B. A., Northeastern University. 

(1971) 

Christine Shultz, M.A., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Walla Walla College; M.A., Walla Walla College. (1966) 

Vivian Snyder, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1972) 

Mildred Spears, M.A.T., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Stephen F. Austin State College; M.A.T., University of Chat- 
tanooga. (1964) 

Shirley Spears, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1971) 

Ronald Springett, B.D., Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A. and B.D., Andrews Univer- , 
sity. (1969) / 

Richard C. Stanley, M.A., Assistant Professor of Office Administration 
B.A., Union College; M.A., Michigan State University. (1964) 

William H. Taylor, M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism 
B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska. (1958) 

Mitchel Thiel, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Union College; M.S., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland (1966) 

Nelson Thomas, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Andrews University; M,A., Michigan State University. 
(1967) 

Joyce Thornton, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Union College; M.S., Boston University. (1969) 

Drew Turlington, M.S., Associate Professor of Industrial Arts v 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., University of Tennessee, 
(1960) 

Smuts van Rooyen, M.A., B.D., Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., B.D., Andrews Uni- 
versity. (1966) 

Wayne E. VandeVere, Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Business Administra- 
tion V 
B.A., Andrews University; M.B.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. (1956) 

Eleanor Walker, B.A., Instructor in Office Administration 
B.A., Walla Walla College. (1969) 

125 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Stanley E. Walker, M.Mus., F.A.G.O., Professor of Music 
B.Mus. and M.Mus., Northwestern University. (1969) 

Robert Warner, M.Mus., Associate Professor of Industrial Arts 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers College; M.Mus., Northwestern Univer- 
sity. (1969) J 

Del La Verne Watson, M.Ed., Professor of Nursing * 

B.S., Union College; M.S., University of Colorado; M.S. and M.Ed., 
Columbia University. (1964) 

Elbert Wescott, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Walla Walla College; M.A., Walla Walla College; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. (1962) 

Allene Wiesner, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1970) 

Lucile White, M.A., Assistant Professor of Office Administration 

B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. (1962) 

Judy Winters, M.S., Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., Emory University. (1972) 

Marianne Wooley, MSLS., Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.S., Andrews University; MSLS, University of Southern Cali- 
fornia. (1966) 

James Zeigler, M.A., Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Madison College; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
(1965) 

Ellen Zollinger, M.S., Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

(1971) 

LECTURERS 

Herman C. Ray, M.A., Lecturer in Religion 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Stetson University. 
(1964) 

Rhea Rolfe, M.A., Lecturer in Behavioral Science 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., Western Michigan University. 
(1970) 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Ronald Barrow, M.A., Principal V 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., Loma Linda University. 
(1968) 



126 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Roy Battle, M.A., Guidance and Counseling and Industrial Arts 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Andrews University. 
(1964) 

Glenda Clark, B.A., Home Economics 

B.A., Southern Missionary College. (1970) 

Don Crook, M.S., Religion, Music 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 
(1958) 

Sylvia Crook, B.A., Languages 

B.A., Southern Missionary College. (1968) 

Robert Davidson, M.A., Mathematics and Science 

B.A., Tulsa University; M.A., Kansas State University. (1968) 

Joyce Dick, B.A., English and Journalism 
B.A., Union College. (1970) 

Helen Durichek, B.A., Treasurer 

B.A., Southern Missionary College. (1971) 

David Knecht, M.A., English and Speech 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Loma Linda University. (1972) 

Peggy Knecht, Registrar 

Harold Kuebler, M.A., Religion 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Andrews University. (1967) 

Roger Miller, M.A., Health and Physical Education 

B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska. (1971) 

Patricia Morrison, B.A., Librarian 

B.A., East Carolina College. (1970) 

Charles Read, M.S., Business Education 

B.S., Union College; M.S., Indiana University. (1969) 

Charles Robertson, M.A., Mathematics and Biology 

B.S., Andrews University; M.A., University of New Mexico. (1969) 

Charles Swinson, M.A., History 

B.S., University of Tampa; M.A., John Hopkins University. (1970) 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Howard Kennedy, M.A., Principal ^ 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers. (1969) 



127 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Weston Babbitt, M.A. 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.A., Andrews University. (1972) 

Richard Christoph, M.Ed. 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.Ed., University of Chatta- 
nooga. (1961) 

Patricia Geach, B.S. 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1971) 

June Gorman, M.A. 

B.S., La Sierra College; M.A., La Sierra College. (1970) 

Margaret Halverson, B.S. 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1971) 

Peggy King, B.S. 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1971) 

Joan Linebaugh, M.A. 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.A., University of Tennessee 
at Chattanooga. (1970) 

Geraldine Miller, B.S. 

B.S., Atlantic Union College. (1971) 

Rhea Rolfe, M.A. 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., Western Michigan University. 

Thyra Sloan, M.A. 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., George Peabody 
College for Teachers. (1966) 

Barbara Stanaway, B.S. 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1972) 

Gordon Swanson, B.S. 

B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1970) 

Dianne Tennant, M.Ed. 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.Ed., Western Kentucky State 
Teachers College. (1969) 






128 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

The president serves as ex officio member of all faculty committees. The person listed 
first serves as the chairman and the second person as the vice chairman. Students serv- 
ing on committees are appointed by the president. 

ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL: Frank Knittel, Charles Fleming, Jr., Cyril 
Futcher, Arno Kutzner, Robert Merchant, R. C. Mills, Kenneth Spears, 
W. H. Taylor. 

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL: Frank Knittel, R. R. Aussner, Douglas Ben- 
nett, Des Cummings, Charles Davis, K. R. Davis, Cyril Futcher, Lawrence 
Hanson, Zerita Hagerman, Delmar Lovejoy, R. C. Mills, Gary Patterson, 
Kenneth Spears, Stanley Walker, plus three students. 

ADMISSIONS: Arno Kutzner, Mary Elam, Cyril Futcher, Kenneth 
Spears, W. H. Taylor, Laurel Wells. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES: Cyril Futcher, Mary Elam, Arno Kutzner, 
Charles Davis, Chairmen of Departments, plus three students. 

COLLEGE RELATIONS: W. H. Taylor, Frank Knittel, Arno Kutzner, 
Genevieve McCormick, R. C. Mills, Marvin Robertson. 

LOANS AND SCHOLARSHIPS: Laurel Wells, Zerita Hagerman, Arno 
Kutzner, Delmar Lovejoy, Mildred Spears, plus two students. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS: 

Administrative: Kenneth Spears, Lyle Botimer, Melvin Campbell, 
Charles Davis, Cyril Futcher, Floyd Greenleaf, Henry Kuhlman, Flor- 
ence Stuckey, Jan Rushing, plus three students. 

Government: Kenneth Spears, Lyle Botimer, Melvin Campbell, Rob- 
ert Francis, Lawrence Hanson, Millie Runyan, Florence Stuckey. 

Programs Committee: Floyd Greenleaf, Don Dick, Edgar Grundset, 
Delmar Lovejoy, Robert Merchant, Marvin Robertson, W, H. Taylor, 
Ellen Zollinger, S. A. president, S. A. program's committee chairman, 
S. A. social committee chairman, S. A. recreational committee chairman. 

Artist- Ad venture Series: Marvin Robertson, Don Dick, H. H. Kuhl- 
man, Arthur Richert, Cecil Rolfe, Jan Rushing, Richard Stanley, Mitchel 
Thiel, Ellen Zollinger, plus two students. 

Film: Robert Merchant, Ronald Barrow, Lyle Botimer, K. R. Davis, 
Genevieve McCormick, Doris Payne, Norman Peek, plus two students. 

Student Personnel: Kenneth Spears, Lyle Botimer, Des Cummings, Jr., 
Joyce Cotham, K. R. Davis, Haziel Henderson, Marian Kuhlman, Clif- 
ford Myers, W. G. Nelson, Fae Rees, Florence Stuckey, Ted Winn. 

Campus Ministry: Kenneth Spears, Bruce Ashton, Douglas Bennett, 
Lyle Botimer, Des Cummings, Jr., William Garber, Don Holland, Delmar 
Lovejoy, Gary Patterson, plus two male students. 

TEACHER EDUCATION COUNCIL: Stuart Berkeley, Vernon Becker, 
Cyril Futcher, K. M. Kennedy, Arno Kutzner, LaVeta Payne, Kenneth 
Spears, and academic departmental representation involved in teaching 
materials and methods and supervising student teaching. 

The following ad hoc committees function under the supervision of the Dean of Stu- 
dents: Ministerial Recommendations; Medical Student Recommendations. 

129 



Qene/td! Qmdw 



Absences 26 

Academic Information 23 

Academic Probation 25 

Academy Building 7 

Accounting, Courses in 38 

Accounts, Payment of 103 

Accreditation 4 

Administration Building 5 

Administrative Staff 117 

Admission to SMC 13 

Aims of the School 1 

Alternating Courses 31 

Application Procedure 13 

Art, Courses in 31 

Arthur W. Spalding School 6 

Attendance Regulations 26 

Audited Courses . 23 

Auxiliary and Vocational Buildings .. 6 

Baccalaureate Degree 

Requirements 1 8 

Bachelor of Arts 21 

Art 31 

Biology 35 

Chemistry 41 

Communications 44 

English 55 

German 72 

History 60 

Mathematics 69 

Music 77 

Physics 88 

Religion 91 

Spanish 73 

Bachelor of Music 76 

Education 76 

Bachelor of Science 21 

Accounting 38 

Behavioral Sciences 33 

Business Administration 38 

Chemistry 41 

Elementary Teacher Education 52 

Foods and Nutrition 62 

Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation ... 57 

Home Economics 62 

Industrial Education 66 

Medical Office Administration 86 

Medical Technology 97 

Nursing 81 

Office Administration 85 

Physics 88 

Banking and Cash Withdrawals 108 

Behavioral, Courses in 33 

Bible, Courses in 93 

Bible Instructor, Four- Year 92 

Biblical Languages 94 

Biology, Courses in 35 

Board of Trustees 116 

Executive Committee 116 



Buildings and Equipment 5 

Business, Courses in 38 

Campus Organizations 10 

Certification, Teacher 53 

Changes in Registration 23 

Chapel Attendance ... 12,26 

Chemistry, Courses in 42 

Class Attendance „... 26 

Class Load 24 

Class Standing 29 

Classifications of Students 29 

College Auditorium 6 

College Plaza 7 

Collegedale Church 7 

Communication, Courses in 46 

Computer Science, Courses in 49 

Concert Lecture Series 11 

Conduct 1 1 

Correspondence Work ... 28 

Counseling ... 9 

Course Load 24 

Course Numbers 31 

Dean's List 29 

Degree Requirements, Basic 18 

Degrees Offered 21 

See Bachelor of Arts 21 

Bachelor of Music 21 

Bachelor of Science 21 

General Education 

Requirements 1 8 

Major and Minor 

Requirements 21 

Departments and Courses of 

Instruction 31 

Departments of 

Art „ 31 

Behavioral Sciences 33 

Biology 35 

Business Administration 38 

Chemistry 41 

Communications 44 

Computer Science 49 

Education 51 

English, Language and Literature .. 55 
Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation 57 

History and Political Science 60 

Home Economics 62 

Industrial Education 66 

Mathematics 69 

Modern Language and Literature .. 72 

Music 74 

Nursing 82 

Office Administration 85 

Physics 88 

Religion 91 

Dining Services 8 



130 



Earl F. Hackman Hall 6 

Economics, Courses in 39 

Education, Courses in 53 

Elementary Education 52 

Employment Service 9 

English, Courses in 56 

Examinations 

Admission by 15 

Credit by 27 

Special 27 

Expenses, See Financial 

Information 103 

Extracurricular Activities 10 



Faculty 

Committees 



5 

129 



Directory „ 119 

Financial Information 1 103 

Expenses 

Advance Payment 103 

Board 107 

Housing „.._ 104, 107 

Late Registration 23 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning 108 

Music Tuition 105 

Payment of Accounts 103 

Tithe and Church Expense 108 

Tuition and Fees 104 

Loans 110 

Alumni Loans 113 

Educational Fund * 113 

National Defense 

Student Loans Ill 

Nurses' Loans 113 

Scholarships 110 

Nurses' Scholarships 113 

Teacher Scholarships 112 

Financial Plans 104 

Fine Arts Series 11 

Food and Nutrition, Courses in 63 

French, Courses in 74 

Freshman Standing 29 

General Education Requirements 18 

German, Courses in 72 

Grading System 25 

Graduation in Absentia 29 

Graduate Requirements 18 

Graduation with Honors ,.. 29 

Greek, Courses in 94 

Guidance and Counseling 9 

Harold A. Miller Hall 

Fine Arts Building 6 

Health, Courses in 58 

Health Service 8 

History of the College 3 

History, Courses in 60 

Home Arts Center 6 

Home Economics, Courses in 63 

Home Economics, Curriculums 62 

Honors, Graduation with 29 



Housing, Married Students 107 

Humanities, Courses in 96 

Incompletes 25 

Industrial Education, Courses in 67 

Industrial Buildings 118 

Industrial Superintendents 118 

Interior Design, Courses in 65 

John H. Talge Residence Hall 6 

Journalism, Courses in 47 

Junior Standing 29 

Labor Regulations 109 

Birth Certificate 110 

Work Permit 110 

Labor-Class Load 24 

Late Registration 23 

Ledford Hall 6 

Library Science, Courses in 96 

Loans 110 

Location of the College 3 

Lyceums 1 1 

Lynn Wood Hall 6 

Major Requirements — 

See Bachelors Degrees 21 

Marriage 12 

Mathematics, Courses in 70 

Medical Service - 8 

Minors „ 21 

Applied Theology _ 91 

Art - ., 31 

Behavioral Sciences (Psychology) .. 33 

Biology 35 

Broadcasting 44 

Business Administration 38 

Chemistry 41 

Communications 44 

Computer Science 49 

Economics 38 

English 55 

Foods and Nutrition 62 

French 72 

German 72 

Health, Physical Education, and 

Recreation 57 

History 60 

Home Economics 62 

Industrial Education 67 

Journalism 44 

Mathematics 70 

Music 77 

Office Administration 86 

Physics 89 

Religion 92 

Spanish 72 

Speech 45 

Modern Languages, Courses in 72 

Moral Conduct 11 

Music 

Courses in 78 



131 



Curriculums 76 

Organizations ~ 80 

Tuition 105 

Non-Departmental Courses 96 

Nursing 

Courses in 83 

Curriculum 82 

Scholarships - 1 10 

Objectives of the College 2 

Office Administration, Courses in 86 

Orientation Program 9 

Philosophy and Objectives 1 

Physical Education, Courses in 58 

Physical Plant Facilities 5 

Physics, Courses in 89 

Placement 10 

Political Science, Courses in 62 

Pre-Professional and 

Technical Curriculums 98 

Dental . 98 

Dental Hygiene 98 

Law 99 

Medical 99 

Occupational Therapy 100 

Optometry 100 

Osteopathy 101 

Physical Therapy 101 

Veterinary Medicine 102 

X-Ray Technician 102 

Publications 10 

Radio Station, WSMC-FM 45 

Registration 23 

Religion and Applied Theology 91 

Religion, Courses in 93 

Religious Organizations 11 

Residence Halls 8 



Scholarships HO 

Scholastic Probation 25 

Secondary Education 53 

Senior Placement Service 10 

Senior Standing ~ 29 

Setting of College 4 

SMC Students 5 

Sociology, Courses in .- - 35 

Sophomore Standing 29 

Spanish, Courses in 73 

Special Student - 15 

Special Fees and 

Miscellaneous Charges 106 

Speech, Courses in 48 

Standards of Conduct ~ 11 

Student Employment Service 9 

Student Apartments 7 

Student Life and Services 8 

Study and Work Load 24 

Subject Requirements 

for Admission 13 

Tardiness ~ 26 

Teacher Certification 52 

Teacher Education 52 

Theology, Courses in 93 

Applied ---. 94 

Tithe and Church Expense 108 

Transcripts 30 

Transfer of Credit 14 

Transfer Students -. 14 

Trustees, Board of 116 

Tuition and Fees 104 

Two- Year Curriculums ~ 22 

Medical Office Administration 86 

Nursing 83 

Office Administration 86 

Withdrawals 23 

Women's Residence Hall 6 

Work-Study Schedule 24, 109 



132 



1972 



JULY 

S M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 I I 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



AUGUST 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
I 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 





OCTOBER 






NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 




s 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 


7 




1 2 3 


4 




1 


2 


8 


9 10 II 12 13 


14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


II 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


10 


II 12 13 14 (5 


16 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


29 


30 31 




26 


27 28 29 30 




24 
31 


25 26 27 28 29 


30 



1973 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 II 12 13 

14 15 16 (7 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 

APRIL 



ICH 



s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 II 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


JULY 






S 


M 


T W T 


F 


c 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 




8 


9 


10 II 12 


13 




15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 




22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 




29 


30 


31 
OCTOBER 






S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 II 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 31 







For Reference 

Not to be taken 
from this library 



N 



T F S 

I 2 3 

8 9 10 

15 16 17 

22 23 24 

!8 29 30 31 

INE 

W T F S 

I 2 

6 7 8 9 

13 14 15 16 

20 21 22 23 

27 28 29 30 



fci 



AUGUST 

T W T 



itnEMEER 

M T W T 



SOUTHERN COLLEGE MCKEE LIBRARY 

lllllllliiiiiiiiii 

TMS084659 



s 
i 

6 7 8 
3 14 15 
21 22 

7 28 29 



NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 II 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31